Kurume Azalea repot dilemma

Clicio

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I have this little kurume that refuses to stop blooming. It's continuous.
There's no such thing as fifth month of the yea,r or winter, or summer, it is always in flower.
As it needs a prune and a possible repot should I forget about all advice on azaleas and simply do it in spring even it being full of flowers?
Any tips very welcome!
 

penumbra

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I have this little kurume that refuses to stop blooming. It's continuous.
There's no such thing as fifth month of the yea,r or winter, or summer, it is always in flower.
As it needs a prune and a possible repot should I forget about all advice on azaleas and simply do it in spring even it being full of flowers?
Any tips very welcome!
What is the variety? There are some out now that are nearly ever blooming.
Funny, I have a satsuki that has been blooming one or two flowers at a time for months.
I really would not let it concern you. Do what is necessary to develop your plant.
Just noticed you name and location so you are full out tropical. I have no experience with azaleas in the tropics, sorry.
 

Harunobu

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You live in a (sub)tropical climate. There is no winter, as far as the azalea is concerned. They are genetically programmed to open all flowers at the same time in spring. But it cannot figure out what time of the year it is. Therefore, they open continously as the plant produces flower buds on apical tips and the buds age.
 

Harunobu

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Oh to add a bit more. I have heard of someone growing satsuki azalea in Hawaii. Maybe it was even on here. And it also flowered flower by flower continuously. I have heard from other people that in subtropical climates, azaleas don't do so well. Many plants don't do well long term in a subtropical climate, because they never go dormant. And then they stop growing, because they falsely fear winter is about to start. And they never get a sign that winter is over because winter never happens. Winter cannot be over if it hasn't been cold yet.

But I hear mixed things about evergreen azaleas doing well in climates where there are no winters. Evergreen azaleas do occur as native species in subtropical climates; China, Vietnam, Thailand. Then Ryukyu and Okinawa Islands are pretty tropical as well. But I think they are only found there at altitude. Of course, altitude doesn't introduce seasons. But those are not the kurume type.

So azalea may actually be one of those species that normally goes dormant in winter, but actually can adapt to tropical climates and not go dormant. As long as it doesn't get too hot and too dry. Heursel claims the ideal temperature for evergreen azaleas is 25 C. They can take much hotter weather. But I guess if you can control the temperatures inside a greenhouse where you grow your azalea, you put the thermostat at 25 C, and not any higher.
 

Clicio

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But I hear mixed things about evergreen azaleas doing well in climates where there are no winters.

Azaleas are the oficial flowers of São Paulo, where I live.
There are many, many azaleas in the parks and avenues here, so much so that it is one of the things I most miss when I am away.
Some of them are around more than 50 years old as they were planted in the 70's.
It is now midwinter here and they are all open; in fact from may to september they thrive.
But they don't like the high summer heat, and most don't flower in the summer.
So I can assure you they do very well around here.
If you go up north, from Rio to the Amazon, you get less and less azaleas, so I guess they don't like very hot weather.
Thanks for your response!
 

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When the bees are buzzing.

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Leo in N E Illinois

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@Clicio
You have caused me a little bit of "climate zone envy".

Right now sounds an idea time to prune back and repot your azalea. I would do both operations on the same day. As long as the azalea is showing signs of active growth, and flowering. It is probably a good time to repot. A bad time to repot is during the high heat of summer, when the landscape azaleas go dormant. Use the azaleas in the landscape as your guide. Avoid pruning and repotting while the landscape azaleas are dormant.
 

Clicio

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River's Edge

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Azaleas are the oficial flowers of São Paulo, where I live.
There are many, many azaleas in the parks and avenues here, so much so that it is one of the things I most miss when I am away.
Some of them are around more than 50 years old as they were planted in the 70's.
It is now midwinter here and they are all open; in fact from may to september they thrive.
But they don't like the high summer heat, and most don't flower in the summer.
So I can assure you they do very well around here.
If you go up north, from Rio to the Amazon, you get less and less azaleas, so I guess they don't like very hot weather.
Thanks for your response!
I would simply follow a process of removing all buds and flowers in one step! Allow the tree to recover for two or three weeks and then do the repot. I would prune only after the repot recovery period. Just a safer process in my opinion. Azalea are very strong but if it has been blooming continuously perhaps some caution is in order.
 

Clicio

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I would simply follow a process of removing all buds and flowers in one step! Allow the tree to recover for two or three weeks and then do the repot. I would prune only after the repot recovery period. Just a safer process in my opinion. Azalea are very strong but if it has been blooming continuously perhaps some caution is in order.

Sounds like a good plan. Makes sense.
So..
1-get rid of buds and flowers now, 2-repot in two weeks, 3-prune in the Spring.
Got it. Thanks a lot, Frank!
 

River's Edge

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I would simply follow a process of removing all buds and flowers in one step! Allow the tree to recover for two or three weeks and then do the repot. I would prune only after the repot recovery period. Just a safer process in my opinion. Azalea are very strong but if it has been blooming continuously perhaps some caution is in order.
Your welcome, if you think recovery is weak at any point than just remove buds prior to flowering for one period of time and allow the leaves to focus on rebuilding the roots, or recovering after pruning. Just a simple way to allow the plant some rest from the drain of blooming! Sure you are already aware of that step, but I left it out of my original post! Must be old age!
 

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