Larch Progression, 5 years

james

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Nursery Larch, 3" trunk, 6" nebari, 14" drum mica pot

As received, Winter 2006



Initial styling, Spring 2007. Repot to 16" drum mica pot


Later Spring 2007


Late Summer 2007, setting branches, building crown, growing lower branches. Workshop with Suthin, deadwood treatment


Fall 2008


Summer 2011, filling in crown and growing lower branches, greater angulation to upper trunk turn to right.



Suggestions? Need to repot into finished pot, again thinking of drum. Refine lower branches. Left sided nebari partially buried. Intend to raise tree with repot, show more left roots, reduce higher right roots. More/elongate deadwood?
 

bonsaiTOM

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I'd say you are doing great work with your trees. Glad you got to work with Suthin. Your plans for future root work sound good. Should give a more stable appearance.

I'm a larch guy. Your deadwood areas please my eye. Lower branches need to be bolder, lengthened some more.

I would consider a pot with some texture but dark, like some of Dale Cochoy's.

Keep up the good work!
 

james

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Thanks for the encouragement, Tom.

Since this picture was taken, lower branches have been let to grow freely. I should have more to style, wire and refine this winter. I too, really like larch. Easy to style and wire. Strong, rapid growth leads to prompt development. Short foliage, and fall color (for a conifer), hard to beat.

As you describe yourself as a "larch guy" I thought I may ask a couple general questions:

1. Source for Japanese Larch stock, with trunks >1-2 inches? Not stick in a pot. I have found with my smaller larches that gaining trunk girth ain't gonna happen any time soon. I bought this at Bonsai Northwest, outside Seattle. Shipped just fine.

2. Some folks (Colin Lewis) say larch "need" to freeze every year. I started with larch when I lived in Seattle, a winter freeze occured occationally, not regularly. Since I have moved to the midwest, all my trees are wintered in a greenhouse, with temps in 40s. I don't see any problem so far, any concern from you. I could leave them out longer in early winter, and get a good freeze in, if needed.

3. By late summer, with temps in 90s, I get a bit of burn, yellow and brown. Nothing too severe, more a cosmetic issue. I have always read full sun is ok. I keep in partial sun, afternoon shade. Your thoughts?

4. Any pictures of your trees, always enjoy seeing other's work.
 

rockm

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Larch do very poorly south of the Mason Dixon line. It is not so much because of the milder winters (although that probably plays a rolte) It's primarily because of the long hot summer nighttime temps. This is a truly Northern species that is used to cooler nighttime temps at the root zone, like below 75, to thrive. Nights here in dixie tend to remain far above that (if you're in Texas, they remain above 1,000 Kelvin until late October:D) The higher temps at the root zone interferes with their ability to function.

They slowly decline and die. It's happened to me with American and Japanese larch. A shame since they thrive in bonsai gardens and backyards only an hour's drive north of me:rolleyes:

Bottom line, keep them as cool as possible in the summer...
 

james

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Rockm,

Interesting observation. I planted a larch several years ago in a shallow ceramic pot. I believe it was too hot, as you mention, and it grew poorly, until given a deeper (and likely cooler) pot. I midwest, night temps can still stay high.

I do see some who place foil over their pots, I imagine this is to decrease the pot from heating up?

Thanks, James
 

Bill S

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I think you will find the American version likes more cold than the Japanese ones, I am fortunate to be where they grow well and only 45 min. from Mr Larch hisself.

Consider putting a thread graft thru that first outside curve, and grow a new first branch.
 

tmmason10

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Another very nice tree. Must be nice to see your collection of trees years of progression through your photos like this.
 

bonsaiTOM

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Thanks for the encouragement, Tom.

Since this picture was taken, lower branches have been let to grow freely. I should have more to style, wire and refine this winter. I too, really like larch. Easy to style and wire. Strong, rapid growth leads to prompt development. Short foliage, and fall color (for a conifer), hard to beat.

As you describe yourself as a "larch guy" I thought I may ask a couple general questions:

1. Source for Japanese Larch stock, with trunks >1-2 inches? Not stick in a pot. I have found with my smaller larches that gaining trunk girth ain't gonna happen any time soon. I bought this at Bonsai Northwest, outside Seattle. Shipped just fine.

2. Some folks (Colin Lewis) say larch "need" to freeze every year. I started with larch when I lived in Seattle, a winter freeze occured occationally, not regularly. Since I have moved to the midwest, all my trees are wintered in a greenhouse, with temps in 40s. I don't see any problem so far, any concern from you. I could leave them out longer in early winter, and get a good freeze in, if needed.

3. By late summer, with temps in 90s, I get a bit of burn, yellow and brown. Nothing too severe, more a cosmetic issue. I have always read full sun is ok. I keep in partial sun, afternoon shade. Your thoughts?

4. Any pictures of your trees, always enjoy seeing other's work.

James,
I call myself a larch guy. It is the tree that got me involved in bonsai about 9 years ago. I'm a student of our club president, known here as HotAction, (do a members search) and he knows larch far more than I.
About your questions I'm sure that larches love the cold. Any reason you need to bring yours into the greenhouse at all? I'd say 40 degrees is too warm for larch. I'm in Zone 4 and they seem to like it here.
MISTER LARCH - Nick Lenz (Massachusetts) has written IMO the larch lovers bible and you really should read and absorb it all. Larch is but one chapter in his book but you can tell it is his favorite tree. I believe it is titled COLLECTED TREES, BONSAI FROM THE WILD or something close to that. My copy is loaned out right now or I would be more sure.
I go with full sun. Keep moist. They like both.
Anyway - sorry, I have no pictures. Don't even own a camera (or cell phone). Check out HotActions photos.
 

Mark59

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James,
I call myself a larch guy. It is the tree that got me involved in bonsai about 9 years ago. I'm a student of our club president, known here as HotAction, (do a members search) and he knows larch far more than I.
About your questions I'm sure that larches love the cold. Any reason you need to bring yours into the greenhouse at all? I'd say 40 degrees is too warm for larch. I'm in Zone 4 and they seem to like it here.
MISTER LARCH - Nick Lenz (Massachusetts) has written IMO the larch lovers bible and you really should read and absorb it all. Larch is but one chapter in his book but you can tell it is his favorite tree. I believe it is titled COLLECTED TREES, BONSAI FROM THE WILD or something close to that. My copy is loaned out right now or I would be more sure.
I go with full sun. Keep moist. They like both.
Anyway - sorry, I have no pictures. Don't even own a camera (or cell phone). Check out HotActions photos.

Hey bonsaiTOM, the book is available from Stone Lantern titled Bonsai from the Wild... Collecting, Styling & Caring for Bonsai. I just got this book and as you said it's a terrific book. Nick Lenz is outstanding. He makes pretty damn good pots too!
 
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M. Frary

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Very nice tree. So this is Japanese larch?
 

BunjaeKorea

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Stunning, larch are gorgeous trees.
 

Cadillactaste

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I absolutely LOVE progression threads! Thanks for sharing the stages of this tree...looks stunning!
 

barrosinc

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the first two images are the perfect example of how a straight trunk when inclined seems to add movement. I looked at the first pic and said, that looks straight... second image WOW.
 

james

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I would estimate this larch to be 24" tall from soil, pot 14" round.

Thanks for all the kind words, and for the discovery of the movement in the trunk by Boon. Still have to fill out lower branches, particularly two lowest. I might consider reduction of the apex, or a sharper apex. Boon felt the rounder apex gives a more mature feel, a taste issue. For now, let it grow and get strong, shape up further in winter.
 

M. Frary

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Have you ever tried defoliating it? There is a member here who has a thread on defloliating American Larches. Fourteener or Crust. I can't remember.
 

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