Large Chaenomeles japonica/ japanese quince dig up, roots, trunk urban yamadori

Driftwood

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Today I dug a urban yamadori Chaenomeles japonica which was about to get chipped. To my shock I found (what it seems to be) a 3'' to 4'' trunk instead of roots and what I thought was basal shoots are branches! Unfortunately, There trunk (or tap root :rolleyes: ) was quiet deep and anchored by big stones, so I ended up cutting it... back home I quickly planted in the ground but forgot to take pictures 😞 Anyone with similar experience? Does Chaenomeles grow such a trunk? does it have any chance to survive? Any comments? Now I understand why yamadori trees are expensive.
 

roberthu

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Never seen one with that thick trunk. Would love to see some photos for sure.
 

Driftwood

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This one is before collection, approx 3.2 feet / 1mt height. I'll try to take a better picture but it won't show that 'trunk' cause it's in the ground... By the way it was full of fruit, I removed at least 20!

chaenomeles .jpg
 

Jzack605

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Sounds like it may have been planted too deep, which is typical, and put out some adventitious roots closer to surface?
 

Driftwood

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Yea and/or they made the rise bed full of stones around it. Any way i remember just two adventitious roots but again thick (about 1''), deep, anchored and cutted.
 

Driftwood

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I'm afraid this picture is not very helpful and don't want to mess it around again.. I guess the only way is to wait and see what happens but I'm not holding my breath!

IMG_20200829_153044.jpg
 

Driftwood

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Well! Last weekend I covert the plant with a plastic bag in the hope to create some humidity and heat (temperatures are dropping to 18C/64F) during this cloudy rainy weather. I wonder how often should be water? Any comments or suggestions?
 

Driftwood

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I'm really hoping this one roots, have started to use Rizhotonic as well but although a heat wave is coming, at the moment the plant is mostly in semi shade so I'm considering to lift the plant again from the ground and put it in a pot with pumice in a more sunny location. Any comments?
 

BobbyLane

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you can experiment. if it dies you learnt a lesson, if it lives after you placed it in a suitable container you gained experience.

bit different but i just did rootwork on 4 hornbeams and a field elm in the last 4 weeks and they are all in full sun. just watered and fed from above with sea weed, fish emulsion miracle gro...slo release on the surface, everything as usual tbh. i only really mist roots when trees are being repotted. dont use rhizo anymore, stopped buying it a few years ago when i ran out and have seen no disadvantages to not using in aiding recently transplanted trees.

i plan on repotting an acer in the next few days and i want to dig up a field maple and possibly a copper beech from my alottment bed. i dont plan any special treatment for any of them. ive done it all before and not noted any loss of vigour come spring.

btw next month is when barerooting season begins in the UK and the hedging nurseries will be filling up with material thats been freshly dug up and just wrapped in hessian bag. these trees are sold to gardeneners and lanscapers to grow on...this has been going on for years and is a profitable time for the nursery industry.
 
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Leo in N E Illinois

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I would just leave the Chaenomeles where it is, in part shade. You can move it in 2 years after it has recovered.

Chaenomeles are deciduous, broadleaf trees, they like moisture, they hate mostly mineral bonsai soils that are used for pines. If you want to kill a quince, pot it in pure red lava. They do a little better in pumice. But best is a mix that is at least 50% Akadama or a 50 % organic mix, like a bark - pumice mix. Too much pumice or lava is a bad thing for Chaenomeles.
 

leatherback

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fwiw i rarely bareroot anything and i find my trees recover quicker this way at any stage of the season i choose to do my repotting. just sayin
How do you deal with getting the plant in a bonsai container? Do you not at some point have to reduce the roots to the point that you need to get rid of the fieldsoil?
Note: I bareroot pretty much all my trees, and most upon collection.
 

BobbyLane

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one example
 
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