Large Trunk Chops

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The two stumps below are Honey Locust, a tree that grows quickly, back buds extremly well on to old wood, even if no foliage is remaining. Compound leaves, but very fine, which turn a beautiful gold in the fall. This is the same species I have used to represent palm trees before.

Although the trunks on these trees are quite large, I chopped them this year down to about 14 - 16 inches, yeasterday I went back and noticed that they are sprouting out all over the place and I need to remove them. I will update this thread with new photos within the next week.

More of an experiment, but who knows?



Will
 

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Ashbarns

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Looking at the rings they grow exceptionally fast too. Would love to see the foliage when it is out.

Ash :D
 
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They do indeed Ash. They are used as street trees because they are very tolerant of pollution, they grow very quickly, the leaves are so fine that they don't require cleanup in the fall, and they are resistant to many diseases and pests....now if they can be made into bonsai....
 

Tachigi

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Quite a challenge Will. I tried containerizing some Black Locus years a go along with a couple of other people in our group. With Locus having compound leaves, thorns and a propensity to drop branches it can be quite maddening. I wish you all the luck in the world with this experiment. While having some draw backs it does have some great attributes, good natural movement and quick development of old gnarly bark. Hope you can pull it off.
 

irene_b

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Looks pretty dang straight.....
But it should be a nice learning tree as far as experiments go.
Post some pics of the leaves.
Mom
 
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Quite a challenge Will. I tried containerizing some Black Locus years a go along with a couple of other people in our group. With Locus having compound leaves, thorns and a propensity to drop branches it can be quite maddening. I wish you all the luck in the world with this experiment. While having some draw backs it does have some great attributes, good natural movement and quick development of old gnarly bark. Hope you can pull it off.
I have good luck with smaller ones in pots and have had some pot bound for two years so far, these stumps will no doubt be much different. This is a thornless cultivar, so I won't have to worry about that, the branch die back hasn't happened with this species yet, the smaller ones, we'll see on the bigger ones.

It should be fun, even if it fails, besides, the trees are doomed anyhow, the worst I can do is prolong it. ;)



WIll
 
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Looks pretty dang straight.....
But it should be a nice learning tree as far as experiments go.
Post some pics of the leaves.
Mom
They are pretty dang straight...any suggestions on wiring?

Seriously, they leave one option, which I considered when chopping them, broom style. The natural form here for this species is broom, so I'll give it a go.


I'll post pics of these when I dig them and also of some leaves.....



Will
 
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Honey locust and black locust both have signifcant thorns (which can be cut off). I have tried cultivating honey locust in the ground and found that pruning scars swell so fast and so large that I gave up trying to mess with them. I am certain the process would be slowed in a pot, however.
 
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Chris,

As I stated above, this cultivar is a thornless one, as attested to by the truck load of branches I hauled away after chopping. This is the same cultivar I used to make the palm tree forest and the single palm tree I showed on this forum, none of those trees swelled at the pruning areas, although this could happen with an older tree, if so...well then the swelling will have to be incorporated into the design I guess.

I also have about a dozen smaller trees in the ground for future palm look-a-likes, no swelling noticed yet and I chop these fast growers back yearly. Maybe we are dealing with different cultivars after all? Or maybe we prune differently?

Anyone here ever dealt with older Honey Locust?




Will
 
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I doubt we prune differently, it may very well be another cultivar of Honey Locust.
 
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After some research, it seems I have Gleditsia triacanthos inermis, a seedless as well as a thornless variety. For those who haven't seen these trees, the foliage is small, light, almost fernlike. I have included some pics below.

A bit about this species can be seen here



hot-linked from kchayka.c-net.us



hot-linked from kchayka.c-net.us



hot-linked from http://www.eskimo.com
 
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Ashbarns

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This seems to be the 'tree with the lot' according to the write up. Pity yours don't have the beans but then you don't get the bonus thorns either. The flowers look spectacular but I am not too thrilled with the leaf system. However it may take on a different appearance as a broom or even weeping style. I read on another googly thing that the timber can be used for woodworking, lathe turning. Personally I would utilise them as ornamentals for the garden or in large tubs. But this is just an experiment and so a learning experience which will be interesting for us all here.

Ash
 

Tachigi

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I have tried cultivating honey locust in the ground and found that pruning scars swell so fast and so large that I gave up trying to mess with them.
Chris, if you ever do decide to mess with locust or anything else that swells significantly after pruning, such as birch. Here is a technique that I have used with great success to minimize that problem. Prune those branches in late fall or winter. It will significantly reduce swelling on those cuts. Obviously you'll want to use cut paste during those dormant times while the tree is basically defenseless.
 
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Making sure the cut is concaved helps also by giving the new tissue room to expand in instead of out. After using concave cutters or knob cutters in some cases, I use a dremel to hollow out the wound a bit more, assuring decent healing.


Will
 
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Irene,

Here is the others I talked about, to give you a better idea of the foliage size.

The first is a little palm forest I am in the process of working on. Made from young trees and only 6" tall from soil to highest tree, you can see the fine structure of the foliage.

The second is of a second tree, again attempting to bring to mind a palm tree, the height of this on is a mere five inches.

One can see that on these anyhow, there is no swelling from pruning and due to the fast growth of this species, these need constant pruning. I imagine that such fine foliage, even compound, may very well work on a broom styling bonsai.


Will
 

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robert1955

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Will,
Living out here in "LaLa land", land of Palm Trees, you did very well on your little palm forest. I would love to see it in person.

Peace
Bob
 
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Thanks Bob,

It is still in development, but it has been fun. It is refreshing to go outside of the box and do things just because you have an idea.

I have replaced the chicken grit (sand) with finer while sand given to me by Nick Keren when he seen this little forest. The trees are all under 5 inches in height and require monthly pruning. Fortunately, this species back buds extremely well, even if taken off below the foliage.

I think next spring this will finally present the image I had in mind for it.


Will
 

irene_b

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Irene,

Here is the others I talked about, to give you a better idea of the foliage size.

The first is a little palm forest I am in the process of working on. Made from young trees and only 6" tall from soil to highest tree, you can see the fine structure of the foliage.

The second is of a second tree, again attempting to bring to mind a palm tree, the height of this on is a mere five inches.

One can see that on these anyhow, there is no swelling from pruning and due to the fast growth of this species, these need constant pruning. I imagine that such fine foliage, even compound, may very well work on a broom styling bonsai.


Will









I do think they represent the image you went for....
And I love to see people experimenting...
Staying in the confines of the "Box" IMHO just limits themself in exploring all the creative possibilites.
Mom
 

TheSteve

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I know this thread is ancient but i am wondering how the stumps are coming along. I had a honey locust once but it expired at the same time as my cat ownership and haven't gotten around to getting another. The weeping style works well with them and I know what you mean about the fast growth.
 
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