Late summer repotting

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Time is the great equalizer as you all well know. Over time these self appreciated masters will fall by the wayside certainly blaming others for their failure to be recognized for these geniuses they are ( in their own mind ). I prefer to watch, learn and observe persons who demonstrate their knowledge of the craft and eagerly share it with others. Maybe guys like Walter, and Vance aren't as warm and fuzzy as you would like, but hey you are not here to be his best pal ( if so, you really suck at it ). You are here to listen and learn and show some appreciation for the experience. IMHO
Have you watched any of Vance's videos? That guy has warm and fuzzy written all over him. IMHO

From my professional standpoint: repotting when the temperatures are not too high or too low is possible. Everything else can easily be directed externally: carbohydrate provision, auxin supply and so on. If we limit ourselves to the calendar, that's fine too.

In a super controlled environment, we even did repotting straight out of the cooler before plants were placed in the summer-condition shelf. It always worked. 150.000 times a year. The other way around took longer, but it still worked. The plants did their restoration and then went dormant. Good way of controlling and equalizing growth in a production facility.

I have bad experiences repotting in (late) summer, because I don't have enough time to provide the right care. That's my first reason not to do it. And because it always turns sweaty, I don't like working in the heat.
 

LeonardB

Shohin
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Again, you are demonstrating what I believe "Nut" is worth. Your experience with repoting is anothert example of what is, not what someone wished was.
I believe Vance was saying that before the tree comes out of the summer dormancy that repotting was in the same condition as late winter/early spring ( when the root damage caused by repoting can be repaired by the tree when it wakes up and there is still plenty of time for the repair and recovery before winter dormancy sets in ). I have seen his technique and have been blown away over the years at how swiftly and gently he rakes the roots and sets them up in the pot to finish. I learn something new each time I observe his handy work.
 

sorce

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believe Vance was saying that before the tree comes out of the summer dormancy that repotting was in the same condition as late winter/early spring ( when the root damage caused by repoting can be repaired by the tree when it wakes up
Yes.

I have a feeling the MOST optimal time is during summer dormancy, but folks fear the heat.

I still have a feeling, and of course, there is enough data here to cipher it, that successful repots will be found to have taken place near a full moon, over every other measurable statistic.

Call out 100 repots, where the owner still has a question to why it died after repot, and I'll bet 70 or more were repotted closer to a new moon.

Call out 100 repots, where the owner thought the tree should have died, but it lived, 70 or more will have been repotted near a full moon.

Call out 100 trees where they were reported and "didn't skip a beat", they were all repotted near a full moon!😉

I can't bring myself to do this research, but if a naysayer cared to prove themselves wrong.....lololol! But for real.

Sorce
 

Forsoothe!

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I, for one and maybe the only one, do not like the use of the words, "summer dormency" which does not exist in reality. The period in summer where nothing NEW is going on: no new leaves or flowers emerging and seeds quietly rippening, thence next years buds being matured, that is a period of renewal that will carry trees through the quiescent period of winter or dry season to follow. Just because they're not dancing in the streets don't mean they're asleep.
 
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LeonardB

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It is as good a reason as any other. Having said that my I add it is therefore possible that a tree survives because you believe it will. NOW THER'S SOMETHING TO CHEW ON.
Now we are talking about Bonsai zen?
 

LeonardB

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I, for one and maybe the only one, do not like the use of the words, "summer dormency" which does not exist in reality. The period in summer where nothing NEW is going on: no new leaves or flowers emerging and seeds quietly rippening, thence next years buds being matured, that is a period of renewal that will carry trees through the quiescent period of winter or dry season to follow. Just because they're not dancing in the streets don't mean they're asleep.
I believe that it is more likely that the tree is spending all its energy to transport water to the foliage where it is tanspired to cool the tree ( roots ) continuously during the summer heat. Once the weather starts to cool the tree can spend more of its resourses on new growth and repair of any damage that needs attention. And as I mentioned, there is still time before the first freeze for recovery before the need to start transfering sugars to the branches slowly preparing for winter. IMHO.
 

Maloghurst

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Yes.

I have a feeling the MOST optimal time is during summer dormancy, but folks fear the heat.

I still have a feeling, and of course, there is enough data here to cipher it, that successful repots will be found to have taken place near a full moon, over every other measurable statistic.

Call out 100 repots, where the owner still has a question to why it died after repot, and I'll bet 70 or more were repotted closer to a new moon.

Call out 100 repots, where the owner thought the tree should have died, but it lived, 70 or more will have been repotted near a full moon.

Call out 100 trees where they were reported and "didn't skip a beat", they were all repotted near a full moon!😉

I can't bring myself to do this research, but if a naysayer cared to prove themselves wrong.....lololol! But for real.

Sorce
Well this sucks for me because I have to conserve all my strength near full moons for the feedings.
259779
 
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For those that were curious about what I said I would be doing and how it turned out with respect late summer repots there's a new video. Late summer repots of deciduous trees in full leaf from pot bound and nursery stock as well as conifers: How are the trees doing three weeks after? They are doing just fine. Three weeks is not enough to show? Perhaps for a conifer but a deciduous evergreen for sure would show and we had pretty warm temps in between.
 

eb84327

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i dont claim to know alot, that way nobody expects anything out me, it either is and you ya know or its not and it doesnt work. might sound like a "no shit" kind of claim but i hate being caught with my dick in my hand. only thing any of us can actual bank on is that nothing stays the same and we are in constant change so at some point every thing i understand will be wrong and ill be forced to adapt.
 

Carol 83

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i dont claim to know alot, that way nobody expects anything out me, it either is and you ya know or its not and it doesnt work. might sound like a "no shit" kind of claim but i hate being caught with my dick in my hand. only thing any of us can actual bank on is that nothing stays the same and we are in constant change so at some point every thing i understand will be wrong and ill be forced to adapt.
Start drinking early?;)🤫🍻
 

eb84327

Mame
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Steal the face right off your head....nothing left to do but smile smile smile.
 
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Anyone else in the last three or four weeks that passed since this thread started did any repot of a deciduous broadleaf tree? Even more so, did any of the vocal nay-sayers here if they are based in locations that allow for a late summer repot tried to expand their mind based on facts and their own experimentation? I hope so but I doubt.
 

Underdog

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I've done quite a few over the last 4-6 weeks. I have in past years as well. Spring is so busy for my business. (Motorcycles) So far all look good.
On the other hand, I had several fatalities this year potting too early in late winter/early spring. Trying to beat the rush when the weather becomes nice. Learned something there...
My summer repots included K Hornbeam, Azalea and Trident Maple among others. All looking well but we'll see come spring who all wakes up.
 

BobbyLane

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ive repotted so many trees over the summer i wont even begin to bore you with all the pics. many of the trees have since been moved on, some had roots cut, some were already in bonsai pots and slipped into different bonsai pots, some were in large nursery air baskets and had roots reduced by sawing off large chunks to fit them into smaller training pots. i post a lot of images and a lot of what ive been posting over the summer are trees that were either repotted or slip potted. all were deciduous, only one was a taxus. ive received no complaints and had no casualties.
 

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