Layering above graft - Senkaki

Jake1510

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20170923_115421.jpg 20170923_115429.jpg 20170923_115500.jpg Hi there!

I just bought this awesome Japanese maple senkaki (or so the tag reads).
It has an awesome shape with good growth on the lower part of the tree.

I want to layer the trunk above the graft to produce nebari.
And at the same time, removing the not so good looking graft.

I've looked at different methods, such ring-bark, and tourniquet / ground+air layering.

It is currently early Spring in Australia, and the leaves haven't grown yet.

My approach as it stands is:

- Wait until leaves harden.
- Apply tourniquet above graft section as a ground layer.
- (How long typically does it take for roots to grow for a tree this size? = 6ft)

- Then possibly air layer one of the branches to create another tree.. Because I do want to prune the higher growth off to bonsai the base.


I am leaving all the growth as it stands to really boost trunk growth for tourniquet.

Does anyone have any suggestions? :)

I have posted pictures, and am happy to post more from different angles :)

Thank you so much in advance!
 

KiwiPlantGuy

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View attachment 161591 View attachment 161592 View attachment 161593 Hi there!

I just bought this awesome Japanese maple senkaki (or so the tag reads).
It has an awesome shape with good growth on the lower part of the tree.

I want to layer the trunk above the graft to produce nebari.
And at the same time, removing the not so good looking graft.

I've looked at different methods, such ring-bark, and tourniquet / ground+air layering.

It is currently early Spring in Australia, and the leaves haven't grown yet.

My approach as it stands is:

- Wait until leaves harden.
- Apply tourniquet above graft section as a ground layer.
- (How long typically does it take for roots to grow for a tree this size? = 6ft)

- Then possibly air layer one of the branches to create another tree.. Because I do want to prune the higher growth off to bonsai the base.


I am leaving all the growth as it stands to really boost trunk growth for tourniquet.

Does anyone have any suggestions? :)

I have posted pictures, and am happy to post more from different angles :)

Thank you so much in advance!

Hi Jake,
Great news about your purchase and Senaki is a lovely variety.
Air-layering via "ring bark" method would be my preference. Also using a 2-3 litre pot, instead of spaghnum moss, filled with Bonsai soil or perlite/bark mix. Only problem with the pot method is you have to be on site to water pot regularly as it will dry out faster.
There are a number of threads already available here on forum about layering.
Tourniquet method has trouble with cambium growing over wire used and doesn't callus ( no roots).
Look under the Propagation section.

If you wanted a slower method Senaki grows ok from cuttings either hardwood or semi hardwood in Summer.
I am over in NZ, so great to have another grower down here to compare notes with :).
Charles
 

Jake1510

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Hey Charles, thanks so much for the quick response :)

Ah okay, that sounds like the new plan then!
Air layering does sound like the way to go, especially to avoid the cambium growing over the wire.

Seeing as it's grafted, would there be much chance of success air layering above the graft on the trunk?

And as for timing, when should I begin the process?

Ah thank you for letting me know about that, I'll take a more diligent look for those sections :p

I definitely agree! And will be happy to post my progress on this too :)

Thank you for the much needed advice

- Jake
 

KiwiPlantGuy

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Hey Charles, thanks so much for the quick response :)

Ah okay, that sounds like the new plan then!
Air layering does sound like the way to go, especially to avoid the cambium growing over the wire.

Seeing as it's grafted, would there be much chance of success air layering above the graft on the trunk?

And as for timing, when should I begin the process?

Ah thank you for letting me know about that, I'll take a more diligent look for those sections :p

I definitely agree! And will be happy to post my progress on this too :)

Thank you for the much needed advice

- Jake

Hi Jake,
As for timing, um there seems to be differing opinions. The normal "tried and true" timing is after growth hardens by December ( our seasons lol) and should produce roots between 1-2 months I think.
I have also read you can start air-layers in the Spring ( as leaves unfold) and as leaves photosynthesis the roots are produced. Unsure how many late Spring frosts you will get as you are having a heat wave really early, as frost burns leaves etc.
There is a school of thought on this forum that one only does air-layers if you have a good trunk section to layer etc. My opinion is that as us beginner bonsai enthusiasts are concerned we do as many air layers as possible for practice. Then we get to practice on trunk chops, nebaris to perfect and other development stuff to enjoy etc.
Then if you do get your hands on something special then you have a 100% chance of securing preformed bonsai.
Good luck on the air-layer project. Also for you to try is that so long as you have leaves formed on all parts of the trunk you can do MULTIPLE air-layers on the same trunk.
Lastly make sure you scrape all cambium layer off or the "ring bark " will grow back over (heal over and no roots formed etc).
Charles
 

sorce

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I don't know enough about maple bark matching to know if this would make sense....
Cuz you wouldn't want Nasty at the base, though being low could make it easier to hide..(moss,wet color differential,canopy shade)
Ask @MACH5 @William N. Valavanis @Brian Van Fleet

But there is a reason they grow em on different roots, so if you can utilize that stock to a pleasant future outcome, I'd try to layer as to get roots from the bottom stock.

Proposed...20170923_050251.jpg

Of course this is way down the road.

I would...

Leave it until that wound is completely healed.

Graft a branch if necessary (green) or take it to a workshop to get it grafted....to keep that side viable.
The hole healing health will help that take.

When that hole is healed and the trunk graft swells a bit more, find your red line to make a layer where the lower rootstock will root.

Keeping that 2-7 year future yellow chop in mind, work that smaller branch into a good future leader.
The upward pointing ones have internodes that are already too long.
The short one is your "to be nurtured " branch there.

Faster Further Future Vision.

Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce
 

MACH5

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Senkaki is another name for coral bark Japanese maple. Beautiful cultivar and should air layer without much difficulty. I am not a big fan of the ring method. You should be fine air layering by ring-barking it. I have had success with both early spring as buds swell and after leaves harden. Typically it will take about 6 to 8 weeks for you to see a good amount of roots. For larger air layers the longer you wait the better. I would probably air layer this tree after leaves harden and then separate it the following spring. If this was my tree I may be tempted to air layer it right where the trunk splits into two to create a twin trunk bonsai.
 

Dav4

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Senkaki is another name for coral bark Japanese maple. Beautiful cultivar and should air layer without much difficulty. I am not a big fan of the ring method. You should be fine air layering by ring-barking it. I have had success with both early spring as buds swell and after leaves harden. Typically it will take about 6 to 8 weeks for you to see a good amount of roots. For larger air layers the longer you wait the better. I would probably air layer this tree after leaves harden and then separate it the following spring. If this was my tree I may be tempted to air layer it right where the trunk splits into two to create a twin trunk bonsai.
I agree with everything above. I've never air layered coral bark acers but I've layered many other cultivars, including several semi dwarf, and with trunks 4"+ in diameter. All layered easily within 2 months using the ring-bark method (never bothered with the tourniquet method), and I've used both sphagnum moss and bonsai soil as rooting medium with equal success.IMG_2638.JPG IMG_2640.JPG
 

MACH5

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Sorry a slight edit on my previous post. I should have said I am not a fan of the tourniquet method. I mistakenly said ring method.
 

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