Learning to carve

Tona

Shohin
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Santa Clarita, California
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9
#1
I don't post much but I have been watching Graham Potter carving videos and searching Harry Harrington's posts on carving deciduous trees. I know not everyone likes deadwood or carving on anything but conifers, but I do. I realized that if I was going to learn anything I would just have to dive in and go for it. I picked an old privet that I didn't much care about as the victim and decided to go a bit extreme to learn how to get depth, grain etc. The first picture shows the before (with some old carving from a year or so ago) in the middle of the bench. The second shows WP_20151017_002.jpg 112.jpg where I am so far today. It's raining so I had to stop. It's not going to win any contests but I got some new bits for Christmas and figured what the H***. Anyway, I'm pretty happy with some of the results I got using different techniques and bits. Feel free to chime in. Like I said it's a practice tree/stump.
Tona
 
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London, England
#2
Its a decent start, the more you do, the better you'll get at it. I like the channels youve created and some of the detail you've got into the edges, I would try and get some shadows into the deeper crevices....maybe by using a burner then brushing with a wire brush, or play around with little dabs of wood stain on a small brush, you could even try black coffee or ink.
 

Tona

Shohin
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Location
Santa Clarita, California
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9
#3
Thanks, I have some more carving and detail work to do and will use some type of shadowing. I got stopped by the rain. Lots of fun though. I will likely try using ink in lime sulfur or a brown water based paint. Hopefully I stop carving before it's just a toothpick. lol
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
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Berwyn, Il
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#5
Lol @coh I unliked that post on accidemt and had to like it again!
That's how much I like it!

Hell with people that don't like carving the D's!
Just have a look over the pond!

@Tona I kind of get the feeling like the picture is what it will look like in person after it "naturalizes".

And the picture, from where I'm sitting, which happens to be Dav4's chair...

Looks real Damn good!

Sorce
 

Giga

Masterpiece
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Virginia beach, VA
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#9
Looks like a great start-I've been working on my carving skillz too and will be posted a thread about it when I'm done. It's very ez to get carried away then your not left with much :rolleyes: but practice make perfect as they say.
 

Tona

Shohin
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Santa Clarita, California
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#10
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Location
Durham, NC USDA Zone 7a
USDA Zone
7a
#14
I love the look of skillfully carved deadwood on D trees. My fear is that I'll spend all that time and then the wood rots and falls apart. I have a privet with deadwood features (that I haven't carved yet) and I've treated them repeatedly with Minwax wood hardener and lime sulphur. The wood above ground is ok after about 5 years, but the wood in contact with soil continues to rot and disappear.
 

just.wing.it

Imperial Masterpiece
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Blips and Chitz (Northern MD, 6b...ish)
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#15
I love the look of skillfully carved deadwood on D trees. My fear is that I'll spend all that time and then the wood rots and falls apart. I have a privet with deadwood features (that I haven't carved yet) and I've treated them repeatedly with Minwax wood hardener and lime sulphur. The wood above ground is ok after about 5 years, but the wood in contact with soil continues to rot and disappear.
Yeah, I think that's common...unfortunately.
I almost went down that road with a tree that is known to rot easy....but it ended up dying...
 
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Location
durham uk
#16
Privet is pretty hard wood I would say mate, could you maybe consider a less humus rich medium for something much freer draining to reduce the contact with moisture as much as poss ...or I'm a talking s##t? I think time doing anything bonsai related is time well spent regardless of the outcome ....a beer in the hamd is worth two in the fridge mate!
 
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Durham, NC USDA Zone 7a
USDA Zone
7a
#17
Privet is pretty hard wood I would say mate, could you maybe consider a less humus rich medium for something much freer draining to reduce the contact with moisture as much as poss ...or I'm a talking s##t? I think time doing anything bonsai related is time well spent regardless of the outcome ....a beer in the hamd is worth two in the fridge mate!
You could be right about the growing medium. I use a much less organic medium now than I did when I started the privet.
 
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durham uk
#18
What do you use if you don't mind me asking? Ive just posted a question about biochar in the other forum, makes yi wonder how willow and alder would fair given that they both don't mind their feet in water.... peace from Durham uk mate
 
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Philly PA zone 6b?
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#19
less humus rich medium for something much freer draining
I will agree with that. I planted a pencil thin Privet in 100% 1/4" lava in a colander earlier this year. It tripled in diameter and grew like a weed.

That's some cool carving there Tona! Like a beaver chopped the tree down and then got ravaged by wood eating bugs. I like!
 
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Location
Durham, NC USDA Zone 7a
USDA Zone
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#20
What do you use if you don't mind me asking? Ive just posted a question about biochar in the other forum, makes yi wonder how willow and alder would fair given that they both don't mind their feet in water.... peace from Durham uk mate
I use 1:1:1 pumice, growstones and coco coir in deciduous, and I'm thinking I'll replace the coco coir with sifted pine bark for coniferous. BTW, growstone is a manufactured glass particle very similar to pumice that I buy locally at a hydroponic supplier. You could probably use lava instead. I've never sprung for akadama yet, but maybe once I start getting trees out of large training pots and into smaller bonsai pots I'll be able to afford the smaller amounts.
 

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