Lob Lolly Collected

ml_work

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Not sure what the name is, think someone referred to them as lob lolly. They are what we have around here, do not back bud that I know of. But I have access to many on some land and these came from a sand pit. In the past I have placed the trees in bags and by the time I pot them at home all the soil/red dirt is gone. This time I took pots with me and dug the amount of dirt to fit the pot. I dug them week after Christmas and we had a freeze coming so I covered the pots with pine straw. They are getting sun most of the day but it is through the pine trees. I have about 10, most have yellow tint to the needles so I know where that is going. But a couple still have nice green color and they are 2 of the best pick.
So I am asking should I leave them were they are for another month, or would they be better to move out into the open field full sun all day?

Thanks,
Michael
 

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rockm

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Loblolly pine is Pinus Taeda. It's also called Bull Pine. Needles tend to be in excess of 6", mostly longer than a Ponderosa's, which can be a challenge. Nice trunk on this one though...
 

jk_lewis

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Loblolly have their needles in clumps of 3. That's the easiest way to be certain what you have. They can be turned into bonsai, but it won't be easy. Needles will reduce a bit, but will always be larger that purists would say is necessary. I've seen some nice "weeping style" bunjin loblolly.

I like the last two trees. At least I think those are three different trees.
 

bwaynef

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Loblolly needles reduce fine. I treat them a little more aggressively than JBP. I lost my nicest one due to an over-aggressive root pruning. It reacted fine but met its demise in the heat of summer.
 

ml_work

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Thanks for the replies to all and the name Rock. I like the trunk too.
I have read the needles do not reduce much but I thought these looked a bit like a Ponderosa. Thought I would work in that direction with them. All 3 pictures are different trees. The last 2 are my picks, others are too tall. This beautiful weather we are having is causing me to rush I am sure. But would it be too soon to remove the pine straw from the pots and move to full sun.
Have a Nice Night
Michael
 

bwaynef

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I have about 10, most have yellow tint to the needles so I know where that is going.
Just so you know, P. taeda often have a yellowish tint ...particularly thru the winter. I've found some do and some don't.


Thanks for the replies to all and the name Rock. I like the trunk too.
I have read the needles do not reduce much but I thought these looked a bit like a Ponderosa.
Have you ever seen examples of loblollies w/ needles that haven't reduced ...or were those people just stating what they've heard? Same idea expressed differently: Have you ever seen how long the needles get on an untrained JBP?
 
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Brian Van Fleet

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Honestly, those look more like P. virginiana than loblolly. I've tried both and settled on virginiana, because it has shorter needle-length and better response to bonsai training. They're more like red pines, but not as brittle. Those are the ones that I see getting yellow in the winter, while the loblolly maintains the deep green color.
 

jk_lewis

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It is easy to tell. Virginia pine has needles in pairs. Loblolly has them in threes.
 

ml_work

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Well this sounds hopeful that the trees have a chance. I too have seen many pines around here with yellow needles and many with dark green right beside them. Figure it was just the process of losing needles. But when I saw mine yellow I figured they were dying, but when I see the full grown trees with yellow it was a wish at best.
Today I looked at the trees, the yellow needles are 3 and the dark green are 2. So it seems I have 2 different species collected from the same place.

"Have you ever seen examples of loblollies w/ needles that haven't reduced ...or were those people just stating what they've heard? Same idea expressed differently: Have you ever seen how long the needles get on an untrained JBP?"
bwaynef

hummm...I see what you are saying. I have seen JBP in training and seen the long needles. But have read or maybe been told that the JBP is most used because it will backbud and needles will reduce with training. So maybe "I" just figured the other pines (like I have) would not do well because they were not the popular choice. But I did see a couple on display in the mall a few years ago. The vendor said they were 25 year old, all the limbs were long as well as the needles. Not much to look at.

But if these live I will find out.
I had one last year in the same soil/ red sand. It was with some other trees in potting soil that did not need water as often, so did not check on it enough. The summer heat dried the dirt to a hard brick!

Thanks for the Help!
Michael
 

jk_lewis

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It is not impossible to get backbudding on a loblolly.
 

ml_work

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JKL
Would there be anyway to promote or help it to?

??
Michael
 

jk_lewis

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Same as any other plant -- keep it tightly pruned while you are developing it. Fertilizer. Keeping the soil at proper moisture (dryer than most) level and keeping the pot cool.

It's as much luck as anyting else, but unlike other pines, these will occasionally backbud -- though maybe not where you want it.
 

ml_work

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Pine Update

Of the 3 pines in the pictures lolly1 and lolly3 are still alive. lolly2, the most interesting one died. lolly1 has some green and some dead needles but I think it may make it.
lolly3 was my second pick of interest and it is doing good. It has needles in pairs so I guess it is Virginia. After moving it from the mulch and shade to full sun I have not touched it other that water. This past week I removed some grass that was in the sandy soil when I collected it. The pictures may not show it but there are a few small candles, which have doubled in size since the picture. I do not want it to get any taller and will not re-pot until next year...or longer? How should I address this years candles?

Thanks,
Michael
 

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