May it be dead?

Fidur

Shohin
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Canary Islands , Spain. Europe
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This is a pseudolarix amabilis. My first winter with it. I know it's a decidous tree and I can expect to lose all the foliage.
But, I bought it as a mallsai, and struggled for 5 months. I finally decided to repot it 3 months ago.
The last weeks it's been losing foliage after browning. I thought it would be the normal behaviour, but I have doubts....
What do you think?.... I guess I'll have to wait till spring to know what happened.....

IMG_20211205_141828.jpg
 

Wires_Guy_wires

Masterpiece
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Most larches go pretty wrinkly in the twigs when they have passed.
If the bark looks smooth and wrinkleless, it's alive.
 
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Your climate seems very warm for a mountain species like golden larch, they are listed as zone 4-7.

Here in the US, our native larches struggle much south of their native range.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

The Professor
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on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
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Pseudolarix amabilis is not related to larches. It is most closely related to Cedrus (true cedars) and Abies (firs) - according to Wikipedia. They are from low and middle elevations in southern China. In cultivation they do well with summer heat and mild winters. They grow well along the Mediterranean. They should be fine in the "nearly Mediterranean" climate of the Canary Islands. So, given that info, my guess would be is that you are seeing normal dormancy. I would just keep it moist all winter, see if it wakes up in spring.

Here's hoping! 👍
 

Fidur

Shohin
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So, as I'm a bit worried for this tree, today I dugged the soil and found that about 2cm deep and all over the soil, there is some kind of white web I had never seen.

IMG_20220130_122604.jpg

So if it's not too late, the question is, is it mold, microryza, some kind of fungi, .....? If it's not good for the tree, how to remove it?
 

Firstflush

Chumono
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coastal sage scrub and chaparral
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Tough one, either beneficial mic or root aphids. In the thicker clusters of the white stuff investigate for small pests.
Have your looked into if the species uses beneficial mic like oaks and pines. Some of the pines on here can have most of the interstitial pore space filled with the mic.
 

Fidur

Shohin
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Location
Canary Islands , Spain. Europe
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Tough one, either beneficial mic or root aphids. In the thicker clusters of the white stuff investigate for small pests.
Have your looked into if the species uses beneficial mic like oaks and pines. Some of the pines on here can have most of the interstitial pore space filled with the mic.
No pests observed. I think it's mycelium.
Yes, it seems they are usually found in pseudolarix. What I don't know is if they are feeding over death roots or healthy roots...

PD: Tree is still green under the bark.....
 
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Looks similar to the mycorrhizae in my pine soil. Should be a good thing. Indicates proper moisture and environment for the tree growth.

Tree looks fine. Dont over-love it. Its going to be fine in spring.

20211231_114440.jpg
 
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