Mayhaw or Hackberry for a forest?

I am trying to decide between developing a Mayhaw or a Hackberry forest. Which one should I go for?

  • Mayhaw

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  • Hackberry

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Cajunrider

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I am thinking about developing a native bonsai forest. These two came to mind.
 
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Hackberry make nice bonsai . Forest could be very nice with multiple smooth bark trees . 👍👍 but I have no idea what a Maybaw is 🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️ If it’s a form of hawthorn that could be nice also so depends what quility of material you have access to but I have a soft spot for non normally used trees and or styles not normally used for certain trees so both would be cool
 

rockm

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Hackberry make nice bonsai . Forest could be very nice with multiple smooth bark trees . 👍👍 but I have no idea what a Maybaw is 🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️ If it’s a form of hawthorn that could be nice also so depends what quility of material you have access to but I have a soft spot for non normally used trees and or styles not normally used for certain trees so both would be cool
 

Cajunrider

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All this would depend on the stock you're starting with. Both hawthorn and hackberry can make pretty decent bonsai.
I have access to find them so the stock quality simply depends on the amount of time I spent to look. I suppose the quality level would be about the same.
For single specimen I can find bigger hackberry but we are talking forest here.
 
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Still depends on you or what your after for a composition. Hawthorn in flower could duplicate a orchard . One or 2 larger hackberry with some smaller ones could be very striking . If it was me I would Go for something that makes a statement . So many forests are fairly mundane . Using materiel that is underdeveloped . Or sub par to stand on there own
 

Cajunrider

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I am stoked. I just collected enough Mayhaw to make a forest. I will be working on it tonight! These trees ranges from 1/2" to 2" base. Some are bearing fruits already. It will be a tough job to keep it shallow since the collected trees all have deep roots. It will take a few years to shorten the height for sure. Doing it all at once seems risky. What do y'all think?
 
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I am stoked. I just collected enough Mayhaw to make a forest. I will be working on it tonight! These trees ranges from 1/2" to 2" base. Some are bearing fruits already. It will be a tough job to keep it shallow since the collected trees all have deep roots. It will take a few years to shorten the height for sure. Doing it all at once seems risky. What do y'all think?
It would be prudent to recover the trees in separate pots . Therefore you can move them around as needed for different rates if recovery . It takes longer but you will end up with better material with smaller root balls to build a better forest . Of course you can work on the trees individually as they recover that way you ultimately put together a puzzle that has pieces prepared to fit together . Pretty risky to put newly collected material together in a forest and I don’t think you will be happy with the results but I have. No experience with any hackberry species
 

Cajunrider

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It would be prudent to recover the trees in separate pots . Therefore you can move them around as needed for different rates if recovery . It takes longer but you will end up with better material with smaller root balls to build a better forest . Of course you can work on the trees individually as they recover that way you ultimately put together a puzzle that has pieces prepared to fit together . Pretty risky to put newly collected material together in a forest and I don’t think you will be happy with the results but I have. No experience with any hackberry species
All great points yet I have an abundance of material and I am itchy to try. I will attempt a more methodical one later when I have more experience with Mayhaw.
 

Cofga

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You need to get them into deep enough pots for the to receover since you are collecting them a bit late if they are in fruit alread. I would have started back in the spring. I have a white haw “forest” that depending on how you count them are from 3-5 trees. I dug them thinking they were a single tree but then when I started separating the the stems I found several individuals. So I just separated them a bit and planted them up as a small forest. That was in Feb 2018 and they didn’t skip a beat. Mine were vary shallow rooted as they came form a mountain top located at about 4000’, not much soil to sink a taproot into.
 
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You need to get them into deep enough pots for the to receover since you are collecting them a bit late if they are in fruit alread. I would have started back in the spring. I have a white haw “forest” that depending on how you count them are from 3-5 trees. I dug them thinking they were a single tree but then when I started separating the the stems I found several individuals. So I just separated them a bit and planted them up as a small forest. That was in Feb 2018 and they didn’t skip a beat. Mine were vary shallow rooted as they came form a mountain top located at about 4000’, not much soil to sink a taproot into.
I’m always envious. If you guys with access to mountains. Ontario is a large province but the highest point is about 2300 feet above sea level . A lot of the province is about the same as where I live 1000 feet a lot of the province is what’s called the Canadian Shield essential large chunks of rock sticking out of the ground but no elevation . Can’t complain to much rock and extreme weather make lots of sources to collect just wear out lots of hiking boots looking
 

Cajunrider

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The fact that these are practically under brush of bigger trees make their root ball skewed and trunks angled away. That made it fairly easy to form a forest. They fit like a jig saw puzzle.
 

penumbra

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I like your placement.
Glad they responded quickly.
 

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