Mendocino Coast Bonsai

Brian Underwood

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I love these guys, and their collected Redwood stock is amazing! They have everything from shohin size trees, all the way up to huge twin trunk stock. http://www.mcbonsai.com/
Feel free to post your experiences with them as well.
 

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cbobgo

Mame
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Very nice trees and very nice people. I have 2 redwoods from them and couldn't be happier.

- bob
 

Bill S

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Brian, no fair posting candy store pix, I have to work. Not to mention the 3000 mile drive.:D
 

rockm

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I've been jonesing for a Redwood from these guys for years. I have grave doubts, however, about winter hardiness of this species here in Va... I don't think I could overwinter one without special (And increasingly expensive) cold greenhouse winter storage...
 

Attila Soos

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I've been jonesing for a Redwood from these guys for years. I have grave doubts, however, about winter hardiness of this species here in Va... I don't think I could overwinter one without special (And increasingly expensive) cold greenhouse winter storage...
Don't bother.
Redwood can only made into bonsai when in optimal health. Even a slight decline in the condition of the tree will ruin the project.They only respond to bonsai techniques when they possess all their vigor.

If you are craving to own a redwood bonsai, there is one thing that I would recommend you try: buy a redwood bonsai that is small-ish in size (one-to-two feet tall, not too small, easy to change its location on your property), and it is already trained into bonsai. Get one that already has well-formed, compact foliage pads. The trunk is not a problem, they all have beautiful trunks. So, you don't have to put it through all the shocks of bonsai training, and the tree doesn't need to recover from those shocks.
All you need to do is maintain it. This way, the tree may be able to survive for a long time, in a low-energy state, without needing the extra engergy to recover from any drastic technique.
You see, the reason why these trees die is because they cannot handle too much shock. They like to be left alone. But they may be able to handle the pinching that is required to maintain them.

I know that for some people, it is above their pride to accept a tree already shaped by others, but this would be a small price to pay for the joy of having such a beautiful tree in their collection. Plus, the challenge to keeping them healthy would be enough to make one proud.
As to overwintering, all you have to do is to keep the temperature above freezing. A small, low-output electric heater in a garage can easily do that. They love humid summers, so that's not a problem for you.

The whole investment shouldn't cost you more than $370 plus shipping($120 for the small-sized material, plus another $250 for the training done in California, to develop pads).
 
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grouper52

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I have nothing but good things to say about Mendicino. Their trees are top notch and priced well, and they seem decent folks to deal with. I've got four of their redwoods, which grow extremely well here - well, I should say my wife has four of their redwoods that I care for - and I have an adorable Mendicino cypress as well that I have great plans for, and which also seems to love the climate here.

I might add that redwoods and sequoia grow very well as landscape trees here, and we've got a pair of each adorning our yard that we planted six years ago. The local Doug firs and Western Red cedars are great trees, but the redwoods and especially the sequoia are just magnificent here, even though not native, and not very old yet.
 

misfit11

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These trees look great! I need to go check them out. I really feel fortunate living where I do as far as bonsai is concerned. A lot of the nurseries that are mentioned in these forums are within a drive from my house: Evergreen garden works, Lone pine gardens, Mendocino Coast Bonsai, Miniature Plant Kingdom etc.

Brian, you know what I'm talkin' about being from Santa Rosa.:)
 

rockm

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"As to overwintering, all you have to do is to keep the temperature above freezing. A small, low-output electric heater in a garage can easily do that. They love humid summers, so that's not a problem for you."

Well, see there's the problem :D. I don't have a garage. I overwinter all but one of my trees in the backyard under mulch. We get temps in this area well below 20 F from the end of Dec. to the end of Feb. We've gotten as low as -13 F.

I have been overwintering a live oak in a cold greenhouse at a nursery 60 miles south of my house. That is expensive to do and isn't going to get any cheaper with gas prices for heating and transportation rising.
 

davetree

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Can you dig a hole in the ground (cold frame) ? Or would it have to be a massive hole ? (which is why I don't do it)
 

october

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They look likr they have very impressive stock....

Also, for those who are in the colder part of the country, perhaps a dawn redwood might be something to look into.. I believe thay can take pretty cold temperatures. However, I do not think they possess the rugged, old majestic look of their costal relatives...

Rob
 
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