Modern stand design

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#1
I don’t know if this is “Art Deco” or “Arts and crafts” or just Boy Scout camp. Cherry with walnut legs and an oil finish. 5-1/2x8. What do you think?
80C90872-3455-416F-B033-7DD35CFF2728.jpeg
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I notched the legs to inset the top by hand with a chisel but since thought of at least 3 other easier and more precise ways of doing it.
 
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Brian Van Fleet

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#3
I really like the stand and the very modern look. However, the design and the light wood will make it challenging to pair with a tree for the right feel. It’s hard to imagine a pot with age and patina sitting on it, but a bright orange Sharaku under a whimsical tree could be cool.
 
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#5
The cherry will darken considerably in a short time to be almost the same shade as the walnut. Like most of my tables so far this one is pretty small so I imagine them used for accents, if not small trees, and either way the pots tend to be brighter and more whimsical and so more compatible. Regadless those are beautiful pots!

I like the picnic table reference! I was really thinking of the simplicity tho, with all straight lines, and I admit the stringers remind me a little of popsicle sticks in their dimensions lol.

Thanks for the compliments.
 
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#6
It looks nice. The cherry will definitely darken significantly with exposure to light. I feel like a chamfer on the top edges of the legs would lighten the appearance a bit. Nice work. I still haven’t gotten around to making any stands. It’s on my long list of things to try eventually.
 

sorce

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#9
You know what she said?
They all say it, they say it to me too.
Too Small, these won't sell!

This is almost TOO Strong of a design for something so small, even the most mountainous suiseki will not give the impression of "heavy enough to need such a strong stand" at that size. IMO.

But I can see this, under a number of collected big American Conifers....
Read that....TREE specifically.

The Pot Color, as stated, is limited due to the light color of stand. I'm working on a yella unglazed body that would suit that link between tree and stand.

So why not go huge?

Sorce
 
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#10
I don’t know if this is “Art Deco” or “Arts and crafts” or just Boy Scout camp. Cherry with walnut legs and an oil finish. 5-1/2x8. What do you think?
View attachment 226497
View attachment 226496
I notched the legs to inset the top by hand with a chisel but since thought of at least 3 other easier and more precise ways of doing it.
I like it a lot! It isn't traditional but it is still pleasing to look at it. My first reaction was that it looks American Craftsman Style.
 
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#11
I really think any future disentrenchment from the predominant culture established bonzo etiquette, and a movement toward one that is more authentic and able to evolve, will first take place in the aesthetics of the display format: The whole gamut of the Japanese tradition of display (containers, tables, placement etc.), which is, I think, in most ways ineffective and hollow and ultimately kind of ridiculous, when drug cross-culturally into our scene. The sad thing is how it controls us through competition, the judges always deferring to the Japanese rule-sets, this being said, innovation will come slow and still, of course, be bound by universal conventions. I am not a big table guy, more of a smashed garbage can lid guy, I do like the feel of your table, when I look at your table my eye quickly becomes fixed on the proportions of the rail, leg, and table-top; the various margins; the symmetry of horizontal placements, and also the overall linearness of it. It is an interesting study--I like the contrasting legs. I might have gone with subtler margins or more asymmetry but these things have to be viewed in person to get the whole gist. Nice work!
 
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#12
I really think any future disentrenchment from the predominant culture established bonzo etiquette, and a movement toward one that is more authentic and able to evolve, will first take place in the aesthetics of the display format: The whole gamut of the Japanese tradition of display (containers, tables, placement etc.), which is, I think, in most ways ineffective and hollow and ultimately kind of ridiculous, when drug cross-culturally into our scene. The sad thing is how it controls us through competition, the judges always deferring to the Japanese rule-sets, this being said, innovation will come slow and still, of course, be bound by universal conventions. I am not a big table guy, more of a smashed garbage can lid guy, I do like the feel of your table, when I look at your table my eye quickly becomes fixed on the proportions of the rail, leg, and table-top; the various margins; the symmetry of horizontal placements, and also the overall linearness of it. It is an interesting study--I like the contrasting legs. I might have gone with subtler margins or more asymmetry but these things have to be viewed in person to get the whole gist. Nice work!

I'm seeing more and more appreciation for non-traditional displays, as long as they "work". To me that means the pieces tie together to evoke a mood or theme.
 
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#13
The first pieces that really spoke to me and made me stare at them before I knew anything about bonsai were Penjing and ROR trees. Then some books and reading and I appreciated the more formal Japanese styles. My present tastes run towards literati and naturalistic styles (and stuff with rocks, I still like rocks) .
 

Adair M

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#14
I really think any future disentrenchment from the predominant culture established bonzo etiquette, and a movement toward one that is more authentic and able to evolve, will first take place in the aesthetics of the display format: The whole gamut of the Japanese tradition of display (containers, tables, placement etc.), which is, I think, in most ways ineffective and hollow and ultimately kind of ridiculous, when drug cross-culturally into our scene. The sad thing is how it controls us through competition, the judges always deferring to the Japanese rule-sets, this being said, innovation will come slow and still, of course, be bound by universal conventions. I am not a big table guy, more of a smashed garbage can lid guy, I do like the feel of your table, when I look at your table my eye quickly becomes fixed on the proportions of the rail, leg, and table-top; the various margins; the symmetry of horizontal placements, and also the overall linearness of it. It is an interesting study--I like the contrasting legs. I might have gone with subtler margins or more asymmetry but these things have to be viewed in person to get the whole gist. Nice work!
I can agree... to a point. If the display elements become so dominant that it becomes a “display” rather than “a bonsai on display”, it’s no longer “bonsai” and another art form entirely.

Traditional “Shohin Display” is at the edge of being more about the Display than the trees.

I don’t use scrolls when I display my bonsai, they’re not a part of my culture, and while I have learned a tiny bit about their use, I don’t understand enough about all the nuances of all the symbolism they confer to feel competent in using them.

And, while I can respect the “art” in using elements like vacuum cleaners, broken baby doll heads, junk cars, etc in showing how Mother Earth will reclaim the detritus we humans have strewn about, I find that theme depressing.

I try to convey the beauty of the tree, and the pot, stand (table) and accent element should harmonize to complement the tree. If you have a rustic tree, rustic pots and stands harmonize. For a highly refined tree, more formal pots and stands are appropriate. Complement, but not distract.

At least, that’s my opinion.
 
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#15
But I can see this, under a number of collected big American Conifers....
Read that....TREE specifically.

So why not go huge?
Given that the style reminds me of an early 20th century Adirondack lodge among other things I can see the conifer as well.

The two tables I have in the works now are full-sized, although not huge. One is a variant on a traditional design while the other is another new design. Big will require some new skills and bigger wood! But I do have some plans ...

my eye quickly becomes fixed on the proportions of the rail, leg, and table-top; the various margins; the symmetry of horizontal placements, and also the overall linearness of it.
Yes, this. I may not always get it right but I am always acutely aware of proportion and paid a lot of attention to all those things you mention. Thank you for noticing!

And, while I can respect the “art” in using elements like vacuum cleaners, broken baby doll heads, junk cars, etc in showing how Mother Earth will reclaim the detritus we humans have strewn about, I find that theme depressing. Complement, but not distract.
Especially the last sentence. In pots as well as the rest of the display. Which is again why I see my more whimsical stands as supporting accent pieces rather than main display trees.

Case illustrating your point - I remember many details about the display at the national arboretum in the PBA show last summer featuring a skateboard as a stand, but the tree itself isn’t one of them.

Thanks for the comments and suggestions!
 
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#20
I see where you got the Boy Scout camp reference. It reminds me of a picnic table. Despite that, or because of it, I like it alot. Great design.
It’s no longer the Boy Scouts because girls have infiltrated the organization. I’m and Eagle Scout and haven’t been involved with for a very long time as women started to become scout masters. Utter BS. If girls don’t like where the Girl Scouts are headed and you like what the Boy Scouts are all about? The change the GS.

Sorry for getting off topic.
 

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