Most interesting option?

brentwood

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I keep looking at this tree, and in trying to talk myself out of doing a slanted. Looking at the junipers forum, I saw a suggestion to bring the top back over the roots.
I wrapped it, tried a little bending, think I could bring the upright limb back across the trunk - that feels like the more interesting tree. No?
Brent
 

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I keep looking at this tree, and in trying to talk myself out of doing a slanted. Looking at the junipers forum, I saw a suggestion to bring the top back over the roots.
I wrapped it, tried a little bending, think I could bring the upright limb back across the trunk - that feels like the more interesting tree. No?
Brent
No! If the tree were mine, i would begin to " Chase Back" the foliage and create new options in the interior closer to the trunk and lower down for new branching.
My concern now is the long bare sections on the trunk and branches in relation to the overall thickness and height of the tree! Previous development has left it with clumps of foliage on the end of bare branches and long distances between the branches.
Junipers bud back easily with proper preparation and good health.
Styling would begin four or five years from now but the outcome would be a better result i believe. Just what i would do, not the only way!
 

brentwood

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No! If the tree were mine, i would begin to " Chase Back" the foliage and create new options in the interior closer to the trunk and lower down for new branching.
My concern now is the long bare sections on the trunk and branches in relation to the overall thickness and height of the tree! Previous development has left it with clumps of foliage on the end of bare branches and long distances between the branches.
Junipers bud back easily with proper preparation and good health.
Styling would begin four or five years from now but the outcome would be a better result i believe. Just what i would do, not the only way!
I agree with that assessment, almost considered going toward literati with it because of that lack of foliage.
How can I chase it back, besides growth and feeding?
I don't think it was ever trimmed, just ignored for years...
Brent
 

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I would think you could do both at the same time.
Bend the top to a more pleasing angle, feed and prune hard at the right times.
 

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I agree with that assessment, almost considered going toward literati with it because of that lack of foliage.
How can I chase it back, besides growth and feeding?
I don't think it was ever trimmed, just ignored for years...
Brent
Exactly, a common occurrence in our hobby! I am currently working on one that was let go for seven years. The foliage on the outside looked fantastic, the branches inside were bare for long stretches.
The process requires growing out, fertiliser and then major cutback to induce budback and interior branching or lower branching in some cases.
Any other work that you do at the same time is likely to weaken the tree and delay the process. You may have to do this more than once to get the desired outcome. The alternative would be grafting branches in desired locations. This is faster initially but the overall outcome is not as satisfactory! Due to weakness of grafted branches, and time it takes to conceal grafting. ( unless scions)
When i know that a long process is in order, the first thing i recommend is repotting to the best available substrate! This sets the tree up for success and speeds up the process! Continuing to work the tree when in nursery soil just slows the process and the development of a suitable rootball for Bonsai purposes.
 

brentwood

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Exactly, a common occurrence in our hobby! I am currently working on one that was let go for seven years. The foliage on the outside looked fantastic, the branches inside were bare for long stretches.
The process requires growing out, fertiliser and then major cutback to induce budback and interior branching or lower branching in some cases.
Any other work that you do at the same time is likely to weaken the tree and delay the process. You may have to do this more than once to get the desired outcome. The alternative would be grafting branches in desired locations. This is faster initially but the overall outcome is not as satisfactory! Due to weakness of grafted branches, and time it takes to conceal grafting. ( unless scions)
When i know that a long process is in order, the first thing i recommend is repotting to the best available substrate! This sets the tree up for success and speeds up the process! Continuing to work the tree when in nursery soil just slows the process and the development of a suitable rootball for Bonsai purposes.
I planned on repotting end of winter, feel like that ship has sailed for the year. I still may do that bend, no pruning, and work the overall health of the tree from there. If I do go slanted, it won't be nearly this tall. That gibes with moving the foliage down and in, I think.
Thanks!
Brent
 

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I planned on repotting end of winter, feel like that ship has sailed for the year. I still may do that bend, no pruning, and work the overall health of the tree from there. If I do go slanted, it won't be nearly this tall. That gibes with moving the foliage down and in, I think.
Thanks!
Brent
Enjoy the process, more important than the speed of results. You will be surprised one day at the progress when least expecting it.
 

brentwood

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One last thought, as I pondering this tree I wonder if maybe I should air layer it here and start with a tree that's better proportioned? Lower half even looks more believable..

B
 

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One last thought, as I pondering this tree I wonder if maybe I should air layer it here and start with a tree that's better proportioned? Lower half even looks more believable..

B
Why not air layer the branches you are going to remove that are not connected to the portion you wish to keep. That would keep a stronger healthier portion left for cut back to induce back budding in the area you wish to develop long term.
 

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