Mountain pine

Hans Vleugels

Yamadori
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This is a Pinus mugo I bought end 2006 from Mr. Polmans' Studio Momiji. It's coming from the French Alps, and I bought it for it's beautiful bark colour, and the fantastic shari.. It's doing well for the moment, but it is a bit to soon to start working on it. Yesterday I removed all of the dead branches, and took some pictures to discuss the posibilities of this tree..
 

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Hans Vleugels

Yamadori
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Here are some possibilities.. i will probably style it in september or october this year..

So let me know your thoughts about this tree, and how you would handle it.. ;)

Best regards from Belgium,
Hans
 

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buddhamonk

Chumono
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We recently had a conversion about mugos and we all agreed that collected mugos from Europe are awesome - this one is no exception.

I like the possibilities with this one and I'd be insterested to see if you end up styling it as a casdade, semi-cascade, or upright.

I don't think I can contribute much at this point but the tree is beautiful

Manny
 

darrellw

Mame
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We recently had a conversion about mugos and we all agreed that collected mugos from Europe are awesome - this one is no exception.
Maybe we need a "Johnny Mugoseed" to plant the mountains here in the US for future generations!

(Yes, I know introducing non-native species can have devastating effect, it is just a joke. If you don't get the reference, check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_appleseed.).

-Darrell
 

cbobgo

Mame
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You know Darrell, I've often thought about doing something like that - cultivated yamadori - planting good bonsai species in a harsh environment, like on a mountain, and leaving them there for 20 years or more. Seems like it would be a fun experiment, but the odds are that the fatality rate would be high, and those that survived probably wouldn't be that much better than just growing them out in the regular ground. Unless you left them there for 50 years or more.

Wonder if anyone has done that? I'm sure given the 100s of years they've been doing bonsai in Japan, someone must have had that thought.

- bob
 

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