Mushroom growing in indoor pot?

Warpbud

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Hello, I'm rather new to this site (and bonsai growing in general).

Today I found a mushroom growing alongside my 2 year old Jacaranda Mimosifolia trio. It's been a humid few days, but this is an indoor bonsai and its been at temperatures varying between 68 and 80 degrees.

Should I be concerned/is the mushroom bad for the plant? I've seen differing opinions on some threads and wanted to make sure this was a safe mushroom.
1655323052777226433106870088939.jpg
 

TN_Jim

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Would not be concerned in the slightest, this is not near the kind of fungi to worry about.
 

Warpbud

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Would not be concerned in the slightest, this is not near the kind of fungi to worry about.
Thank you! I was worried bc this is my first time growing bonsai and I've never seen this in any of my succulent pots!

Do you know what might be causing it?
 

HorseloverFat

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Do you know what might be causing it?

Many pathogens and fungal spores simply exist in our air.

When they find "apt" conditions.. they will grow.

As @TN_Jim pointed out.. this isn't menacing fungi..

But I WOULD be concerned about the conditions which ALLOWED the fungi to grow..

I believe this to be a mix of the highly organic soil, and (most likely) inadequate airflow around containers. This will EVENTUALLY be detrimental to your roots.

If there is no fan blowing on them, plants AND containers, I'd recommend it.

Proper lighting schedule can cut down on excess moisture/fungal/pathogen issues.

Your supplemental lighting, indoors, should (in my opinion) be at LEAST 16 hours light . (I personally operate in between 18-19)

And lastly... soil/substrate..

Highly organic soil INDOORS fosters MANY "negative situations".. and for indoor plants, I find phasing out organic soil to be beneficial.

Tell us about your area where yoy grow...

Do you have access to outside?
 

Warpbud

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Many pathogens and fungal spores simply exist in our air.

When they find "apt" conditions.. they will grow.

As @TN_Jim pointed out.. this isn't menacing fungi..

But I WOULD be concerned about the conditions which ALLOWED the fungi to grow..

I believe this to be a mix of the highly organic soil, and (most likely) inadequate airflow around containers. This will EVENTUALLY be detrimental to your roots.

If there is no fan blowing on them, plants AND containers, I'd recommend it.

Proper lighting schedule can cut down on excess moisture/fungal/pathogen issues.

Your supplemental lighting, indoors, should (in my opinion) be at LEAST 16 hours light . (I personally operate in between 18-19)

And lastly... soil/substrate..

Highly organic soil INDOORS fosters MANY "negative situations".. and for indoor plants, I find phasing out organic soil to be beneficial.

Tell us about your area where yoy grow...

Do you have access to outside?
The soil I used is the fast drain potting mix that's meant for cacti and succulents. I actually recently moved it into the path of a fan, about 4 days ago! In terms of area to grow, I live in a second floor apartment but I do have a balcony that I can use.

My biggest concern about putting it outdoors currently is that we're experiencing a massive heat wave right now (90 to 100+ F with 60% humidity minimum) so I'm not sure if I want to put it outside right now. I also live in a place where there is tons of wind year round, and snow in the winter, and i really dont want to bring bugs indoors when i bring the plant in for winter.

It gets about 14 to 16 hours of sun a day! My roommate and I are medical students, so we're up early and make sure to open up the blinds so it gets sun almost from sunrise to sunset, and is under a lamp for the remaining few hours.

It's been about a year and a half since i replaced the soil, do you think if I repot with fresh soil it'll help? Does fast draining soil lose that ability after a while? I've been watering it almost every other day since its summer, should I maybe cut back on that?

Thank you for all your help!
 

TN_Jim

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The soil I used is the fast drain potting mix that's meant for cacti and succulents. I actually recently moved it into the path of a fan, about 4 days ago! In terms of area to grow, I live in a second floor apartment but I do have a balcony that I can use.

My biggest concern about putting it outdoors currently is that we're experiencing a massive heat wave right now (90 to 100+ F with 60% humidity minimum) so I'm not sure if I want to put it outside right now. I also live in a place where there is tons of wind year round, and snow in the winter, and i really dont want to bring bugs indoors when i bring the plant in for winter.

It gets about 14 to 16 hours of sun a day! My roommate and I are medical students, so we're up early and make sure to open up the blinds so it gets sun almost from sunrise to sunset, and is under a lamp for the remaining few hours.

It's been about a year and a half since i replaced the soil, do you think if I repot with fresh soil it'll help? Does fast draining soil lose that ability after a while? I've been watering it almost every other day since its summer, should I maybe cut back on that?

Thank you for all your help!
duplicate the native habitat conditions of ALL plants is the best approach -of course, bonsai gets complicated and I don’t live in a jungle or a desert (have plants from); although, your plants will typically have the highest fitness if beginning and honing from this starting approach with each species to the best of ability…sun, light, and water in the wild

 

TN_Jim

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can definitely handle those temps and sun…would ease it into full to not shock leaves
BEB939A6-AA32-4AF5-A88E-4646C8CAA671.jpeg
 

sorce

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Loyola?

Welcome to Crazy!

IMO, a soil capable of shrooming should be encouraged.
The conditions for them to fruit may be the enemy, especially indoors.

Sorce
 

Mayank

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Hello, I'm rather new to this site (and bonsai growing in general).

Today I found a mushroom growing alongside my 2 year old Jacaranda Mimosifolia trio. It's been a humid few days, but this is an indoor bonsai and its been at temperatures varying between 68 and 80 degrees.

Should I be concerned/is the mushroom bad for the plant? I've seen differing opinions on some threads and wanted to make sure this was a safe mushroom.
View attachment 442195
This looks like a regular house plant not a bonsai. Do you have a full shot of the plant?
 
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