Mushrooms growing in the soil - HELP

jlins

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Hi friends,

I have very recently noticed two mushrooms sprout from the soil of my fukien tea tree. If i move the rocks above the soil, there are blankets of white fungus which i am sure is where the root of the white mushroom is. Anyway, are these good for my tree? bad?
 

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River's Edge

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I would suggest that they indicate a substrate that is staying too wet and not holding enough air for optimum health! Also decomposing organic matter in the pot such as rotting roots or decomposing wood chips.The mushrooms themselves likely having no effect on your tree.
 

barrosinc

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I think you are supposed to immediately eat mushrooms without looking them up. At least that's what my Scout leader would say! Seriously, though what is the reason for the pea gravel top dress?
They say eating unidentified mushrooms can feed you for a lifetime
 

TN_Jim

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this tree always lives inside? i have a couple of these and believe they (and all) really appreciate it if you transition them outside for awhile to get the fat ol sun..
agree with all above here, mushroom good, soil....maybe not great?
 

garywood

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J, common sense approach ;-) You're growing conditions are perfect for growing mushrooms ;-) Your tree seems to be healthy and happy. So it's either a symbiosis or just conditions are right for both ;-)
 

Vance Wood

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Mushrooms are not usually a sign of a problem. There are symbiotic fungi that live in the soil that are critical to the health of most Pines and other conifers.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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I have had issues growing mushrooms when I didn't aerate them enough, so they're no sign of "lack of aeration" for that matter.
If you keep mushroom cultures too wet, they don't grow either.
 

leatherback

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It is normal to get mushrooms on pots with a healthy substrate. Start worrying when you have them growing on your tree.
 

Nanuk

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I just this year started getting mushrooms in one of my cactus pots.
Three so far. Funny thing is they seem to be allergic to being stuck.
They grow up healthy looking till they touch one of the cactus spines.
They die shortly after that.:)
 

RKMcGinnis

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Hi friends,

I have very recently noticed two mushrooms sprout from the soil of my fukien tea tree. If i move the rocks above the soil, there are blankets of white fungus which i am sure is where the root of the white mushroom is. Anyway, are these good for my tree? bad?
If it was a fungus that was parasitic such as the honey fungus. You would see a decline in the tree since it's so small. These fungus mycelium (the white threads under soil) deprive the nutrients from a tree then feed on the dead tree. I just had some shrooms sprout in my healthiest japanese maple pot. I knew it was a mycorrhizal type. Didn't spend time trying to id cause it was obvious since the tree is the healthiest one I have. If your tree is healthy and vigorous it is most likely a mycorrhizal type mycelium which is living in symbiosis with the tree roots. The tree provides this mycelium woth sugars and the mycelium has nitrogen and other nutrients readily available. I saw this through a mycologists microscope. Mushroom mycelium also can consume bacteria and other mycelium that is not as developed. So you should not destroy the mycelium mat if your tree is healthy and vigorous. Let the mushroom spore so it can live with your tree. The world's largest organism is a honey fungus mycelium mat in Oregon. It's like 2000 years old. Constantly consuming a large portion of a forest.
 
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