My accents

Hans Vleugels

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Here some pictures of my accent plantings. Hope you enjoy them..

First one is Japanese blood grass (Imperata cylindra "Red Baron") in a Dan Barton pot.

Second one Japanese forest grass ( Hakonechloa macra "Aureola") in an unknown pot.

Third one is Leptinella potentillina mixed with Cornus canandensis in a pot by Jos Jacobs from Belgium.

And the last one is a mix of Sedum sexangularum, Phlox subulata, Achillea millefolium, and another one from which I can't remember the name for now..

Regards,
Hans
 

irene_b

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Nice!
Hans, who is the last pot made by?
I like it!
Mom
 
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Irene,

The last pot is made by John Pitt. (file names often reveal a lot).


Hans,

For my taste, the accents would be more if they were less. Too much can be distracting to the eye and sometime the visual impact of a planting is lost when there is too many stems, leaves, and such. With accents I think less is more, in example with blood grass, I find just a few blades to be more attractive to the eye than a pot full, the color and texture is better shown and appreciated more when the grass is not lost within a "bush."

Minimalism. Simplicity. Use of empty space. Wabi, if you will.


Will
 
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Hans,

For my taste, the accents would be more if they were less. Too much can be distracting to the eye and sometime the visual impact of a planting is lost when there is too many stems, leaves, and such. With accents I think less is more, in example with blood grass, I find just a few blades to be more attractive to the eye than a pot full, the color and texture is better shown and appreciated more when the grass is not lost within a "bush."

Minimalism. Simplicity. Use of empty space. Wabi, if you will.


Will
Hans, let me first say I love your accent plants. They are lovely and fabulously healthy, well groomed.

I would agree with Will to a point. For some plantings, a minimalist ethos can be a valuable thing, especially in light of the pot selected.

But sometimes full also needs to be represented. The key is not to confuse full with "busy." I like the bloodgrass as it is, but would probably remove the few blades that wander to the right, so that this one's unequivocal movement is to the left. I would also thin it somewhat and moss the base.

For the second one, it needs some movement or other interest. As it is, it is very symmetrical. I would consider dividing it.

The third is my favorite, and I would probably do no more than remove a few of the fronds on the left, as this one has definite movement to the right, and so many left-pointed ones fight that a little. It's a small thing, really.
 
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Hans Vleugels

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On the bloodgrass I agree with removing some of the blades that aren't in line, but my aim is to get it as full as possible. It should look like blazing fire in this nice pot of Dan, with the flames going straigth upwards. Yet I understand your point of minimalism, Will...

I have the same opinion on the Japanese forest grass, Chris. Maybe I will repot it in a spherical pot, or it probably will never be repotted. I will just wait until it pops out of the pot, or until the pot brakes. Then I will present it as ne-arai. (without a pot, on a dish)

Thanks for your thoughts...

Regards,
Hans
 

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