My first pot from ceramics class

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Portland (ish), OR
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#1
Started a ceramics class today and trying my hand at ceramics again. Last time I played w clay was about 25 years ago. It is 10 in. (25 cm) wide. Thought I’d start with something more manageable in size. I have another slab built oval started but didn’t have time to add feet yet. 90B45D1C-2B69-4FD6-B044-427C152B3BBC.jpeg 8FC185FF-3293-44D4-8D0B-E04B64F9AB27.jpeg 76AFB1CC-5B7F-440F-A994-A13FA1C92A0E.jpeg
 

Tiki

Yamadori
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#5
Now that is a solid built pot! Dont gotta be afraid of breaking that one.
Hefty Hefty Hefty
 
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#7
Great job! Nice edges and pretty darn square. Looks like you have another part of bonsai to explore and master. Welcome to the pot side!
 
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Portland (ish), OR
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#9
I think there's a lot of people on that side, here. ;)
Ummm, I live in Portland ya know?

Everyone is right, It is a very chunky pot. I need to figure out how to adjust the slab roller a little. Though I do want to try making a good sized pot for a maple. Thinking if I can manage a 16 inch pot I will really have something to show for my classes,

Wish me luck.
 
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Seattle
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#10
I really like the pot, really nice job well done. Didn't know you are from Portland I came last week for few days in Holiday!
 

M. Frary

Bonsai Godzilla
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#13
Very nice.
Plain,unglazed,unadorned,straight sided pots are my favorite ones.
I'm putting everything in unglazed pots now.
Conifers and decidious.
 
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#14
Nice....very nice. The height and width are balanced with well proportioned clean fitting feet. The drainage holes are placed well. I like the clean line appearance of the sides...like a formal setting. Some smaller diameter wire holes in the bottom would be a nice addition for future pots.
Does it take a longer time to dry a pot with walls of this thickness? (The sides seem thick...it may just be a photo illusion though)
 
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#15
So, my mom slapped my in the head with a brick of clay last week, told me to get a bottle of wine, and that she reserved a kiln.
Quality family time!
Does anyone have any advice to spare when making your first pots? Like things that look possible but sure are not. Maybe some handy techniques that don't come naturally?
 
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Portland (ish), OR
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#16
Nice....very nice. The height and width are balanced with well proportioned clean fitting feet. The drainage holes are placed well. I like the clean line appearance of the sides...like a formal setting. Some smaller diameter wire holes in the bottom would be a nice addition for future pots.
Does it take a longer time to dry a pot with walls of this thickness? (The sides seem thick...it may just be a photo illusion though)
The walls are a little on the thick side for a pot of this size. At least I think so. I didn’t know how to adjust the slab roller to a thinner setting. I will ask tomorrow at class.

Drying time: we’ll see tomorrow. I wrapped it in plastic to dry for the last week. In my experience thicker clay has a greater likelihood of cracking, so it is advisable to let it dry more slowly. I will do a little clean up on it and set it out for the final dry and first firing. Depending on how it looks in bisque I may end up glazing it. Glaze can cover a multitude of imperfections!
 
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#17
This was my next effort. I love the way taiko pots look. They are effective with a variety of trees. So this week’s offering is a soft edged, not quite oval shape. I added the taiko nails on a whim and think there is a good copper green semi matte glaze I’ve got my eye on for the second firing. The “nails” are kind of chunky and I think they might make for an interesting glaze effect.

5998ED95-F0F0-43B7-923E-BC5A926B9241.jpeg ABFD3880-FF2D-4A9F-B617-AF7D82736672.jpeg 223BA170-7E9E-403B-BC44-170E42E724F8.jpeg
 
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#18
My next two efforts. This one is about 15” across. I threw the sides on the wheel then cut and put it on a slab to make it oval. Added a little texture with the end of a chopstick. Should be good with a glaze that breaks a little. I’m thinking of it for European beech I’ve been working on for a while. Anyone have thoughts on glaze?

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The second is a larger cascade pot. Traditional slab built about 9” y’all and 8” across. Has to dry a bit before I can add feet.

No plan to glaze this one. I will probably do an iron oxide rinse to darken it up. What do you think of nails like a taiko pot? I’ve never seen a cascade or a square taiko. Much less both.

0988AFA3-A9E8-4A84-BAAE-FA1B122102A9.jpeg 32E8504E-987C-465F-8396-373C94315F16.jpeg
 
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#19
The glaze. I’d keep the glaze simple and allow your chopstick indentations to provide light and shadow areas. I’d probably start on one end in a blue green tone and end on the other side with most a green tone. I would get carried away with any speckle treatments or other diversions from the character you’ve indented the pot with. Let the light and shadows make the difference.
 
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Portland (ish), OR
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#20
The glaze. I’d keep the glaze simple and allow your chopstick indentations to provide light and shadow areas. I’d probably start on one end in a blue green tone and end on the other side with most a green tone. I would get carried away with any speckle treatments or other diversions from the character you’ve indented the pot with. Let the light and shadows make the difference.
Yeah, I tend to be on the conservative side when it comes to glazes. I prefer matte glaze and in fairly classic colors. No speckle-dy stuff for me. I do like effects that you get from the way glazes interact with surface elements. There is a dull cream that breaks with bits of iron oxide on edges. That might be interesting...🧐
 

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