My Japanese Red Pine

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
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This is a tree I have owned for 4 years. I purchased it at New England Bonsa Gardens on discount during their Members' Day celebration (I REALLY miss NEBG!!!). Hitoshi had picked this one up in CA during one of his buying trips, where I think it had sat in someones back yard for a LONG time without much work. All the growth was at the end of 4 long, straight branches. I re-potted the tree, removed/jinned 2 branches, and built the canopy out of the two that remained. The long cascading branch was actually bent 90 degrees to end up where it is now.

This tree has proven to be very vigorous. While living in MA, it grew wonderfully and back budded well every year, and seems to being doing well here in GA. This summer, I decandled it for the second consecutive year, and it budded back nicely. Last month, at the suggestion of Suthin Sulkovisit, who saw the tree at my club meeting, I compressed the trunk down a bit with a guy wire(he gave me a hand, too...thanks Suthin). I just finished needle plucking/wiring last week. I'm hoping this might be showable in a few years. Thanks,

Dave
 

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We miss you too Dave! That one is coming along nicely!
good luck.
john
 

Dav4

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We miss you too Dave! That one is coming along nicely!
good luck.
john

Right back at you, John!! Wednesday nights just aren't the same anymore:(. I'm glad you like the image. As someone who saw the tree at the beginning, you can appreciate how far it has come. I hope all is well with you (hip, family, etc), as well. Take care,

Dave
 

Bonsai Basho

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Hi

That's really noice Red Pine, It has really great bark. Have you considered drawing it up a little straighter so as the top foliage tightens it gets more of a bunjin feel? I think that might work but its hard to say because I can see only one angle. Think you are doing a great job there.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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COOL! I love JRP bonsai, and this one has some age, nice base, and I see great potential in your design. It reminds me of one I've seen in BT #38, which had a great gallery of akamatsu. International Bonsai 2007 #4 was largely dedicated to JRP and has some good info as well. You don't see many of them in the US.

Do you find that the branches are brittle compared to the white and black pines? I think I cracked every branch on mine when I wired it last, but through luck (and raffia),only lost one little branch.
 

mcpesq817

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Great looking JRP - when it fills out over time, it will make for a really nice tree. Too bad we don't see more JRPs.

I have a semi-cascade "Jane Kluis" variety that I'm working on. It buds like crazy and gets very dense, so after needle thinning and wiring earlier this year, I'm thinking about decandling next summer to start working on further ramification and shorter needles. For purposes of pine techniques, do you treat your JRP similarly to a JBP or a JWP? I've heard that they are like JBPs, but not as vigorous when it comes to responding to JBP techniques.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Great looking JRP - when it fills out over time, it will make for a really nice tree. Too bad we don't see more JRPs.

I have a semi-cascade "Jane Kluis" variety that I'm working on. It buds like crazy and gets very dense, so after needle thinning and wiring earlier this year, I'm thinking about decandling next summer to start working on further ramification and shorter needles. For purposes of pine techniques, do you treat your JRP similarly to a JBP or a JWP? I've heard that they are like JBPs, but not as vigorous when it comes to responding to JBP techniques.

JRP can handle candle-pruning like JBP, but you need to do it about 2 weeks earlier (mid June here instead of early July) because they start growing earlier and take longer to grow new candles. If you wait too long, it will respond by producing only new buds for next year, which isn't altogether bad, but it does weaken the tree because with no new growth, it's forced to get energy from old needles.
 

mcpesq817

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JRP can handle candle-pruning like JBP, but you need to do it about 2 weeks earlier (mid June here instead of early July) because they start growing earlier and take longer to grow new candles. If you wait too long, it will respond by producing only new buds for next year, which isn't altogether bad, but it does weaken the tree because with no new growth, it's forced to get energy from old needles.

Thanks very much for the tip Brian. Really appreciate it :)
 

Dav4

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Thanks for the comments everyone. Brian, I've found this tree to be fairly flexible and extremely forgiving when forcing severe bends... this tree has experienced more then a few split forks and cambium busting bends without losing any branching. By the way, I did use vet wrap when I made the initial 90 degree bend in the cascading branch.

As Brian said, you treat JRP like JBP, generally speaking. They are supposed to be a bit less vigorous then JBP, particularly down south, but this tree has proven to be healthier and more resilient then my only black pine, though I will admit that I've abused that tree and it needs a year or two to recover its vigor. As I mentioned in the original post, this red pine has been needle plucked and decandled 2 years in a row without any obvious loss in strength. At this point, I'm not planning on decandling this coming summer...we shall see:cool:.
 

Attila Soos

Omono
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Red pines are beautiful, I prefer them for black pines any day, for they gracefulness and bark. That's a great tree Dave, I would just give that falling branch a little more movement so that it doesn't create a negative space in the form of a square. Something looking like irregular stairs, growing at 45 degrees downwards.
 
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Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
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Agreed Attilla...there are actually three branchlets on the front portion that branch that attempt to create that stairway effect. Time and better photography will hopefully highlight this. Thanks for the comments.

Dave
 

bonsaiTOM

Mame
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I truly love this tree Dave. And I know it will continue to age well over time. Will be interesting to watch your 'tweaks', perhaps with jinning.
 

Dav4

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fall 2011

The tree was decandled for the third year in a row, this time in mid July. I'm planning on wiring again later this fall, then perhaps re-potting into a nice tokoname pot by Bigei next spring. I've removed a fair amount of the old needles, but I'm leaving some on the weaker areas as I'm hoping to decandle again next year and want the buds to be strong.
 

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october

Masterpiece
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I love this tree. I find myself, many times, drawn to this style when it comes to pines. That being a natural, yamadori like quality style. Not that the perfect informal uprights etc.. are not beautiful. However, there is just something about a pine with it's own unique character and proportions.

Rob
 

Dav4

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This one continues to do well...strong spring growth again...will get candled in mid July.
 

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tmmason10

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Looks good Dave. I've seen a few JRP at NE bonsai that I've thought about getting. I believe the summer sell down has commenced!
 

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
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Ah yes,...the NEBG summer selldown sale...I remember it like it was yesterday......:cool:. Seriously, what a great way to get good material for a good price. Keep an eye on those yamadori rocky mtn junipers for me;)
 

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