My Maples in Montreal

derek7745

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I gave up on the Montréal club, and joined Les Bois Francs, from Drummondville. It is more a group of good dudes enjoying working trees, hell first workshop I went to everyone brought beer! Last night was great, guys brought wine/beer, very casual maybe 10 of us and David.
Thanks Wilson! I just sent them an email about becoming a member/receiving newsletters!

Might reach out the Quebec-city club too!

Thanks again :)

Please keep me posted about getting in touch would Dave! If we can organize that visit, beer is on me! His garden must be an endless source of inspiration!
 

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What a great podcast about with such an interesting person! A modern day polymath!

Really liking Ryan's growing interest in Bonsai in Canada, and Montreal in particular :)

https://soundcloud.com/asymmetry-podcast%2Fpierre-seguin
@Wilson @Cosmos @Rafael Najmanovich if you haven't already, make sure to give this a listen !
I look forward to listening on my drive home. He is a big shooter in Montréal, maybe a future club President.
 

Wilson

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What a great podcast about with such an interesting person! A modern day polymath!

Really liking Ryan's growing interest in Bonsai in Canada, and Montreal in particular :)

https://soundcloud.com/asymmetry-podcast%2Fpierre-seguin
@Wilson @Cosmos @Rafael Najmanovich if you haven't already, make sure to give this a listen !
Finally got through this, and wow he is an interesting dude! Hopefully he becomes more involved in the administration of the SBPM. I have heard about the study group Kabudachi, definetly more experienced group.
 

derek7745

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-- After a long drive to his garden, I finally had the honour of shaking the hand of Bill Valavanis.

Bill happily shared information about the history and development of his impressive trees. It's difficult to describe just how incredible this experience was.

I paid close attention to trunk and nebari development, and learned a lot from Bill who had such clear answers for my questions! I am beyond grateful!

I also got to meet Alan Adair, Ron Maggio, and Doug! What a day!

-- I then made my way to Vineland nurseries, where I picked up a few landscape maples, all of which will be propagated and tested for their bonsai (pictures to come later when they've all leafed out). Some of these I know work well, others are a roll of the dice:
Aka Shigitatsu Sawa
Sango Kaku
Shishigashira
Miwaka Yatsubusa
Hogyoku
Katsura
Taylor's pink (introduced by Dick van der Maat, notoriously difficult to keep long term in any landscape)
Ryusen (a weeping palmatum)

-- Finally, I made my way to Kim's Nature, and picked up Akadama from the only known source in Canada (it is illegal in several provinces). It is difficult for me to know the quality of this Akadama at the moment (@MACH5 @Brian Van Fleet have you used this brand before?), but it really is my only option. It has the crumbly texture when squeezed. It comes in 3 sizes - far too small, far too large, or just right. There is some 'dust' accumulation in the bags which Ryan Neil said to avoid, but again, it's my only option.

I left Montreal at 2:00am, and made it back home for 11:30pm... i unloaded trees from a cargo van in the middle of the night in the pouring rain, likely confirming for my neighbours who were peeking through their windows everything they already thought LOL
 

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derek7745

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Sounds like a great road trip!
No books by the way! He is all sold out! I did get to see his copy in person though, and it is very worth having!

our Montreal crew should try to organize a visit/workshop either in Rochester or in Montreal!
 

derek7745

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If "250°C" means it was heated to 482F, it should be free of diseases and pests, no ?
the only kind of akadama permitted is heated to 1200C, at which point is looses most of its desirable qualities. Most people use alternatives, but i'm happy to go the extra mile (500km, actually LOL) to give it a try. I think (or hope) i bought enough for at least 2-4 years
 

coh

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-- After a long drive to his garden, I finally had the honour of shaking the hand of Bill Valavanis.

Bill happily shared information about the history and development of his impressive trees. It's difficult to describe just how incredible this experience was.

I paid close attention to trunk and nebari development, and learned a lot from Bill who had such clear answers for my questions! I am beyond grateful!

I also got to meet Alan Adair, Ron Maggio, and Doug! What a day!

-- I then made my way to Vineland nurseries, where I picked up a few landscape maples, all of which will be propagated and tested for their bonsai (pictures to come later when they've all leafed out). Some of these I know work well, others are a roll of the dice:
Aka Shigitatsu Sawa
Sango Kaku
Shishigashira
Miwaka Yatsubusa
Hogyoku
Katsura
Taylor's pink (introduced by Dick van der Maat, notoriously difficult to keep long term in any landscape)
Ryusen (a weeping palmatum)

-- Finally, I made my way to Kim's Nature, and picked up Akadama from the only known source in Canada (it is illegal in several provinces). It is difficult for me to know the quality of this Akadama at the moment (@MACH5 @Brian Van Fleet have you used this brand before?), but it really is my only option. It has the crumbly texture when squeezed. It comes in 3 sizes - far too small, far too large, or just right. There is some 'dust' accumulation in the bags which Ryan Neil said to avoid, but again, it's my only option.

I left Montreal at 2:00am, and made it back home for 11:30pm... i unloaded trees from a cargo van in the middle of the night in the pouring rain, likely confirming for my neighbours who were peeking through their windows everything they already thought LOL
Glad you made it! Bill's place is a great way to spend a few hours. I need to get down there, will try to make it to his open house in 2 weeks.

Mikawa yatsubusa...very very slow grower. I had one for a while but realized it would probably take 100 years or more to ever develop it into something.
 

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Dedication from a new perspective......
tumblr_mxwpgoCByi1qf1aoao1_500.gif

….that's some road trip!!:cool::cool::cool::cool:

I would say that Bill's garden would be the Mecca on the east coast/world if you are a lover of Japanese Maples. Or, more appropriately, a fan of well-practiced classical Japanese bonsai.

….you going to run a neat Akadama mix?




I do have Bill's "Fine Bonsai" as well as the pleat-straightening "Classical Bonsai Art". My partner in sin was forced to use her credit card for it. So, obviously he personalized it in her name. How's that for perspective?:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D
 

derek7745

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Mikawa yatsubusa...very very slow grower. I had one for a while but realized it would probably take 100 years or more to ever develop it into something.
then i'm certainly glad i'm starting them now! :eek: Hopefully somebody will want to finish them one day :oops:

I bought a grafted mother plant. i'll keep it in a pot for now, while i propagate it over 2-3 years. With most of these, Hogyoku especially, i really want to get a good 100+ trees growing steady before I risk them in the yard with my 5b winters. I really like the hogyoku leaf shape, i'm hoping it will cooperate with my bonsai needs

Or, more appropriately, a fan of well-practiced classical Japanese bonsai
yes, i think this is what draws me to his trees in particular. I have to say seeing them in person was mind blowing - i imagined his deshojo 18" tall for some reason, it's me 30-36". Hi Katsura is also much bigger than i thought! I really really like that.

he also has 3 really nice koto hime forests that I never really noticed until I was there in person

the pleat-straightening "Classical Bonsai Art". My partner in sin was forced to use her credit card for it. So, obviously he personalized it in her name. How's that for perspective?
LOL!!!
 

derek7745

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--On tuesday the retired curator of the Montreal Botanical Gardens, David Easterbrook, welcomed me in his private garden. We worked on 4 trees at different stages of development, starting with a 2 year old cutting and ending with much more developed material. We focused a lot on trunk development and design, which is primary interest for me at this point in my 'bonsai career'. We also closed scars, wired branches and discussed their placement, chose leaders, and so on. We looked at thread grafts, approach grafts, root grafts, and so on. We seemingly touched on every topic and performed almost all of them.

This was an amazing experience! David's garden is obviously spectacular, but a root-over-rock deshojo in particular caught my eye! Even slightly damaged from a surprise late frost (may 4th!!), this tree is incredible :eek:

--On wednesday i got to spend a full day with Yves Letourneau, from Bonsai ENR. The day was focused on propagation of Acer Palmatum. Over the last 35 years or so Yves has developed some incredible tricks, and now propagates through cuttings with ease! Even with cultivars as famously difficult as Deshojo he has remarkable success! We did some classroom-style work, and a lot of hands on!

We also got into thread grafting, approach grafting, moving branches and so on. In some ways, Yves is kind of like the Ebihara of Quebec. The second to last picture is not just branches grafted onto a trunk -- he finally shared with me some impressive technical feats. When this tree is pruned later in the year I will dedicate a post to it.

Every evening was appropriately ended with some Quebec classics to fill the stomach before the ride back home.

Oh... and I finally bought 2 prunus mume cuttings! I always told myself i'd stick to Acer Palmatum, but I caved! I'm lucky that these must be at least 10-15 years away from flowering, so that gives me time to set-up a proper greenhouse for winter viewing.... if they aren't ravaged by insects or fungus before then :confused:
 

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thumblessprimate1

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--On tuesday the retired curator of the Montreal Botanical Gardens, David Easterbrook, welcomed me in his private garden. We worked on 4 trees at different stages of development, starting with a 2 year old cutting and ending with much more developed material. We focused a lot on trunk development and design, which is primary interest for me at this point in my 'bonsai career'. We also closed scars, wired branches and discussed their placement, chose leaders, and so on. We looked at thread grafts, approach grafts, root grafts, and so on. We seemingly touched on every topic and performed almost all of them.

This was an amazing experience! David's garden is obviously spectacular, but a root-over-rock deshojo in particular caught my eye! Even slightly damaged from a surprise late frost (may 4th!!), this tree is incredible :eek:

--On wednesday i got to spend a full day with Yves Letourneau, from Bonsai ENR. The day was focused on propagation of Acer Palmatum. Over the last 35 years or so Yves has developed some incredible tricks, and now propagates through cuttings with ease! Even with cultivars as famously difficult as Deshojo he has remarkable success! We did some classroom-style work, and a lot of hands on!

We also got into thread grafting, approach grafting, moving branches and so on. In some ways, Yves is kind of like the Ebihara of Quebec. The second to last picture is not just branches grafted onto a trunk -- he finally shared with me some impressive technical feats. When this tree is pruned later in the year I will dedicate a post to it.

Every evening was appropriately ended with some Quebec classics to fill the stomach before the ride back home.

Oh... and I finally bought 2 prunus mume cuttings! I always told myself i'd stick to Acer Palmatum, but I caved! I'm lucky that these must be at least 10-15 years away from flowering, so that gives me time to set-up a proper greenhouse for winter viewing.... if they aren't ravaged by insects or fungus before then :confused:
David E. has very nice trees. I love his flowering quinces and maples.
 

derek7745

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David E. has very nice trees. I love his flowering quinces and maples.
i have to say we focused on maples and completely ignored everything else! I'll have to ask him about them next time i'm there! Thanks for the heads up! Maybe there is some overlap with prunus mume!

David also had a lot of collected trees! They look impressive, but that isn't something i'm into right now.
 

derek7745

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was wondering if anybody could please help me with this question?

i’ve read that prunus mume only flowers on new growth, and doesn’t back bud very much if at all

I’m looking at the prunus mume’s from Omiya, and it does seem like only the ends of branches (new growth) are producing leaves — how does one maintain a ‘finished’ prunus mume over the years? Would you reach a point where it just gets too big and outgrows its own design?

@Brian Van Fleet
@Adair M
@Owen Reich

ps: if i may, i’m also curious what your spraying, and when? (Do you spray lime sulphur after blooms drop, and before leaves emerge like Maples?) i read some people spray in fall?
 

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Brian Van Fleet

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was wondering if anybody could please help me with this question?

i’ve read that prunus mume only flowers on new growth, and doesn’t back bud very much if at all

I’m looking at the prunus mume’s from Omiya, and it does seem like only the ends of branches (new growth) are producing leaves — how does one maintain a ‘finished’ prunus mume over the years? Would you reach a point where it just gets too big and outgrows its own design?

@Brian Van Fleet
@Adair M
@Owen Reich

ps: if i may, i’m also curious what your spraying, and when? (Do you spray lime sulphur after blooms drop, and before leaves emerge like Maples?) i read some people spray in fall?
They do tend to get leggy, and put out flowers and new growth at the tips of branches. It becomes necessary to graft eventually, and I’m told they graft pretty easily. The pruning technique to encourage vegetative buds closer to the trunk is described in an old International Bonsai magazine, and is basically removing the first 2 leaves on each shoot as once they have grown about 5 nodes in the spring. The idea is, where the leaves were removed, the tree is more likely to produce viable vegetative buds.

https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/prunus-mume.6707/page-17
https://nebaribonsai.wordpress.com/2017/02/18/a-conversation-with-enrique-castano-on-ume/

And yes, lime sulfur after blooming, just as the leaf buds are beginning to swell.
 

derek7745

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Thanks so much @Brian Van Fleet

i’ve been compiling info from your blog, peter tea’s blog, and a bunch of posts here - lots of great info! I didn’t get my hands on that 1982 issue, but it has been paraphrased often - would still like to see it eventually! made myself notes and calendar - mostly copy paste from those sources ?

I’m really getting into this! Love the species of plant!

Thanks again!!!
 

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