My year around bonsai work in the Inland Empire, CA

bonhe

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Proportion ratios are usually given in whole numbers. So I think you are saying in the portions

2:4:1:4

Even though you may make it as a 'half recipe', correct? :confused:
Sorry for confusion!
When I says ratio it means ratio! :)
I create this one to make me recognize the content easier! I separate inorganic and organic by "/" It is why you see "/" sign. Inorganic part has akadama, pumice, and lava cinder with ratio as you saw. Organic has fir ground and mini pine bark with ratio. Inorganic/ organic = 1/1 in my formula for those trees.
With conifers, inorganic/ organic = 2/1 for me.
I hope I don't make you confused more!!!
Bonhe
 

0soyoung

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Sorry for confusion!
When I says ratio it means ratio! :)
I create this one to make me recognize the content easier! I separate inorganic and organic by "/" It is why you see "/" sign. Inorganic part has akadama, pumice, and lava cinder with ratio as you saw. Organic has fir ground and mini pine bark with ratio. Inorganic/ organic = 1/1 in my formula for those trees.
With conifers, inorganic/ organic = 2/1 for me.
I hope I don't make you confused more!!!
Bonhe
I am not sure that I get it.
I don't mean to belabor things- I'll study this example more closely (wishing I hadn't replied quite yet = posts cannot be deleted).
 
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0soyoung

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I am not sure that I get it.
I don't mean to belabor things- I'll study this example more closely (wishing I hadn't replied quite yet = posts cannot be deleted).
If I'm getting it, "/" simply replaces the conventional ":" between inorganic components and organic ones.
So, 2 parts Akadama, 1 part pumice, 3 parts lava, 2 parts bark, for example (you implicitly have an ordering of the 5 or so components you use) would be
2:1:3/2
Right?
 

bonhe

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If I'm getting it, "/" simply replaces the conventional ":" between inorganic components and organic ones.
So, 2 parts Akadama, 1 part pumice, 3 parts lava, 2 parts bark, for example (you implicitly have an ordering of the 5 or so components you use) would be
2:1:3/2
Right?
"/" means dividing. For example: 4/2 = 2. A/B means ratio between A and B. A is inorganic, B is organic.
A has akadama, pumice and lava cinder. Their ratio is 1:2:1 (one part of akadama, 2 parts of pumice, one part of lava cinder). So, A will have 1 + 2 +1 = 4 parts
B has fir ground and mini pine bark. Their ratio is 2:2 (two parts of fir ground, 2 parts of pine bark). So B will have 2 + 2 = 4 parts
Then, A/B = 4/4 = 1/1. It means inorganic: organic ratio is 1:1.
I hope I make myself clear enough! :)
Bonhe
 

0soyoung

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"/" means dividing. For example: 4/2 = 2. A/B means ratio between A and B. A is inorganic, B is organic.
A has akadama, pumice and lava cinder. Their ratio is 1:2:1 (one part of akadama, 2 parts of pumice, one part of lava cinder). So, A will have 1 + 2 +1 = 4 parts
B has fir ground and mini pine bark. Their ratio is 2:2 (two parts of fir ground, 2 parts of pine bark). So B will have 2 + 2 = 4 parts
Then, A/B = 4/4 = 1/1. It means inorganic: organic ratio is 1:1.
I hope I make myself clear enough! :)
Bonhe
Okay, I get it. :cool:
Thank you.
My apologies for mucking up your thread. :(
 

bonhe

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I just received this contorted ume as a giveaway yesterday. It was not in a good shape at all. It had a lot of dieback at the branches and was in a one gallon plastic pot.
IMG_6702.jpg IMG_6704.jpg IMG_6705.jpg IMG_6706.jpg

The previous owner knows that I have a "green thumb", so he let me rescue it! :)
After I removed all of dead branches. This is a sign of heavily rootbound.
IMG_6707.jpg

It has a two new shoots emerging from the old wood.
IMG_6703.jpg

It was perfect time to change the soil. I used akadama: pumice: lava cinder/pine bark: fir ground with the ratio of 1:1:1/1:2
As expected, it had a lot of rootbound goes around the bottom half and outer third. I cut those roots and removed all the old soil. The tree was placed into the bonsai pot. As usual, I used the twine to stabilize the tree in the pot.
Finished.
IMG_6711.jpg

This afternoon, I saw a lot of new vegetative buds at the old wood. Ume is one of species which is well known for sending the vegetative buds out of the very old wood!
IMG_6721.jpg IMG_6722.jpg

I am fully confident that it is going to let me see its flowers in the next winter. :cool:
Bonhe
 

bonhe

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All of my pomegranates has young shoots at this time. I have to use the interlocking technique to bend down some branches.
Like this young branch
IMG_6770.jpg
At its base
IMG_6771.jpg

The lower branch is used to lock the upper one
IMG_6772.jpg

At the base of the locked one
IMG_6773.jpg

Another tree
IMG_6786.jpg

The young shoot on the apex
IMG_6787.jpg

It was bent down
IMG_6788.jpg

via the interlocking technique with lower branch's assistance
IMG_6789.jpg

Bonhe
 

bonhe

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This is the first time I found this sign on my Brazilian rain tree. Its bark was peeled off itself!
IMG_6780.jpg IMG_6781.jpg IMG_6783.jpg IMG_6782.jpg IMG_6784.jpg

I think this winter is hotter than the previous winters in my place, it is why the tree still have green leaves at this time.
IMG_6778.jpg IMG_6779.jpg

Bonhe
 

bonhe

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I started using this reflector this morning for the large juniper. Because the tree and pot are so heavy, and it was just transplanted, I don't want to move it. It is why I have to use aluminum reflector to supply extra light to the area of the tree which does not receive direct sunlight at this time.

IMG_6800 - Copy.jpg IMG_6798.jpg

IMG_6802.jpg IMG_6801.jpg

I like this light affect!
IMG_6803.jpg
Bonhe
 

bonhe

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Ah, this morning I removed the plastic bag covered for these two Lantana camara cuttings. I love this plant for its flowers and scents. I believe I can make nice bonsai from them in the near future.
IMG_6876.jpg IMG_6877.jpg
Bonhe
 

bonhe

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I just bought a bag of small orchid bark this afternoon. I have used it for few years. Excellent stuff.
IMG_6974.jpg IMG_6473.jpg

and one bag of Turf-N-Tee. It is forest product. Never used it, but it looks good to me! Its smell is so good!
IMG_6975.jpg IMG_6972.jpg IMG_6973.jpg

I bought them in Orange Farm Supply with 10 % off for bonsai club member (depending on the cashier, sometime I got 15 % off :))
Bonhe
 
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I just bought a bag of small orchid bark this afternoon. I have used it for few years. Excellent stuff.
View attachment 186939 View attachment 186936

and one bag of Turf-N-Tee. It is forest product. Never used it, but it looks good to me! Its smell is so good!
View attachment 186940 View attachment 186937 View attachment 186938

I bought them in Orange Farm Supply with 10 % off for bonsai club member (depending on the cashier, sometime I got 15 % off :))
Bonhe
I've been using the same seedling bark for a year with good results. How will you use the Turf-Tee?
 

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