Mycorrhizal Fungi

Mike423

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Any one have any experience with using mycorrhizal fungi on species other than pines or conifers? I always figured that it would help in some way for deciduous and tropicals concerning nutrient uptake and or root health but how much? Or for that case would it even be noticeable? And if so concerning what form (ectomycorrhizae or endomycorrhizae)? Its kind of daunting how many different brand mixtures with different beneficial bacteria there are on the market. I have read up on it quite a bit in the past and have heard it works well for pines, with older healthy specimens have a natural amount present in the root ball, but I have never had any experience with its effects personally.

-Mike
 

rockm

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Buying the stuff is rarely effective. There are more than one kind of myc. It can be species-specific. The best thing to do, IMO, is just let your tree "catch" their own. It will show up in containers by itself and it will be the appropriate kind.

Deciduous species, including oaks, hornbeam and a few others, use myc. I have seen it in my oak and hornbeam--mushrooms growing from the root mass are a good sign that it is present, as mushrooms are sometimes the surface manifestation of the soil growing fungus. It can help, but it is no miracle working substance. Additionally, agressive fertilization can inhibit its growth.
 

Mojosan

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Additionally, agressive fertilization can inhibit its growth.

This is something I had not considered. Thanks for the tip Rock...
 

jk_lewis

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Additionally, agressive fertilization can inhibit its growth.

Additionally, agressive fertilization WILL inhibit its growth. <g>

Much too much is made over mycorrhiza for bonsai. For fully mature conifers -- especially pines -- that you maybe fertilize once or twice in the growing seson, they may have some benefit. Otherwise, we provide our bonsai with all the nutrient they need -- for free so there's no need for the help of mycorrhiza, unlike with Ma Nature, who makes trees work for their food out in her domain.

As Rockm says, if a tree "needs" them, they will come. A yamadori pine (or whatever) undoubtedly comes to you with some clinging to its roots. Nursery plants come with them, too -- you can't bare root bare enough to get rid of them all.
 

rockm

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"Additionally, agressive fertilization WILL inhibit its growth. <g>

Much too much is made over mycorrhiza for bonsai. For fully mature conifers -- especially pines -- that you maybe fertilize once or twice in the growing seson, they may have some benefit. Otherwise, we provide our bonsai with all the nutrient they need -- for free so there's no need for the help of mycorrhiza, unlike with Ma Nature, who makes trees work for their food out in her domain."

I agree. I think the Myc sold in stores is akin to the packaged moss spores sold for bonsai. It's expensive. It works on and off, usually off. Requires exact conditions to sprout and since the stuff is alive, the thought it can be bottled and sold like hair tonic is questionable...to me at least. It's also incredibly expensive.

You can get it from free at repotting time from another bonsaiist. All you have to do is get a chunk of old soil from a tree that has it and mix it into your soil...
 

Smoke

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I like to see the symbiont,i'm sure they feel better together.

Your probably thinking "savant" of which you would definitely have something in common with.
 

Smoke

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Additionally, agressive fertilization can inhibit its growth.

This is something I had not considered. Thanks for the tip Rock...


hmmmm....I experience just the opposite, finding the myc only with agressive fertilization of which I have talked about since 2000, and began usuing humates 7 years ago.

Trident maple with layers of the stuff.
 

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greerhw

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hmmmm....I experience just the opposite, finding the myc only with agressive fertilization of which I have talked about since 2000, and began usuing humates 7 years ago.

Trident maple with layers of the stuff.

Send me 20 bucks and I will save all you trees with MCR, otherwise you are doomed !!!!

Harry
 

parhamr

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This is what I use for ectomycorrhizal inoculation: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00520P2W4/

Here are the results from a super mild and rainy October:
IMG_9853.JPG

Quercus garryana:
IMG_9845.JPGIMG_9850.JPG

White birch:
IMG_9864.JPG IMG_9866.JPG

I think the light colored mushrooms are Lactarius. The darker, club fungi are likely some sort of Basidiomycota.
 
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bleumeon

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I used some mycorrhizal innoculents last spring too. Generally stuff in my coarser soil can't reliably sustain mycorrhizal filaments or fruiting bodies. When there's a lot of rain or the weather is cool sometimes I see it show up. For my trees in the ground after using the innoculents they develop fruiting bodies much more easily. As long as its not a parasitic fungus I think mushrooms growing in your pot means the soil conditions are healthy.
 

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