Napa Oil Dry part no. 8822

milehigh_7

Mister 500,000
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milehigh_7

Mister 500,000
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"Kiln dried" is not the same as "fired". Kiln dried is to warm it up enough to evaporate all the water. To be fired is has to have been heated to a critical temperature where structural changes take place.
I had not even thought of this. It totally makes sense!
 

Anthony

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The funny thing is Leca also comes in 5 and 4 mm.

All you guys have to do is find a company in the US that
makes the hydroponic pebbles and ask for the size.

Then a very little composted bark or peat moss and you will
have the Ball Bearing Principle and a material that also holds
water / fertiliser within itself and the composted material
handles the biological factor the roots need.

The pebbles should also not break or decompose with extreme
time.

@milehigh_7 ,

Clyde the idea was for Sorce to fire the material and sell as
natural hydroponic pebble.
From bag [ if correct size ] into a container in his kiln.
Not raw.

Good Day
Anthony
 
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Agreed. N95 mask or better.

What mix do you use, then?
I have gradually settled on an inorganic mix with four basic components.
1.Horticultural Pumice ( sifted for preferred particle size and specific use)
Ie: drainage, promoting root growth coarser or finer, cuttings, seed etc.
2. Black Lava ( sifted to remove fines)
3. Granite Grit ( sold as turkey grit called Cherry Stone)
4. Akadama ( harder, medium size particle, better quality)
Percentage of each component changes for specificle would be purpose as may the particle size.
For example for young aggressive pines, more grit for weight and stability with the grow box or container chosen. They can quickly extend and fill out becoming top heavy for lighter mixes.
Another example would be increasing the pumice for greater water retention and or lighter weight soil mix.
The black lava is a bit heavier than the pumice and a great color to darken the mix.
Note: because i use an inorganic soil mix, i use an organic fertilizer to promote microbial growth in the beginning. I also use a portion of the old soil to transfer other necessary micro-organisms.
The akadama is usually around 10% to 20 % of the overall.
The exception is for Azaela and then i prefer Kanuma to Akadama. Due to cost i limit the number of Azaela in my collection.
It is my belief that this approach gives my plants more years of uninterrupted growth and the components last way longer making them cost effective in the long run. The added benefit is trees that can be worked on more often and developed at a faster pace.
 
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Is this commonly accepted as true? I had never heard this.
In Bonsai i would not assume that very much is commonly accepted as true;). The statement is true, i begin with organic fertilizer for the reasons stated. After the opportunity to establish microbial activity has taken place in the inorganic mix i feel comfortable switching to inorganic fertilizer if it suits my purpose. Plants use nutrients that are available only if they can be converted to there use. Microbial action breaks down the nutrients into useable forms for the plants. I think you will find that those who use inorganic soil components have learned to add organic in the form of their fertilizer for better results. Some simply add a small portion of bark. The plants ability to use the nutrients is also affected by water hardness, and PH. Users of Inorganic soils need to adjust for the fact that fertilizer is not held for later use as in an organic mix. Therefore more use can be made of Organic fertilizer cakes or repeated use of liquid fertilizer. One advantage of inorganic soil is the ability to control the availability of fertilizer more closely for refinement and or controlled ramification. Not as easy when the organic soil holds or decomposes continuously into available nutrients.
Always a trade off. The devil is in the details:mad:.
 

Anthony

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Hey Frank, don't forget to mention, that as well as fermented oil seed cake,
They also use high quality ------ Fish emulsion.

I like how you think:cool::cool::cool:
Good Day
Anthony
 
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I was actually just considering picking up some 5-1-1 fish emulsion for my 100% inorganic soil. I guess this deals the deal.
 
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Hey Frank, don't forget to mention, that as well as fermented oil seed cake,
They also use high quality ------ Fish emulsion.

I like how you think:cool::cool::cool:
Good Day
Anthony
You forgot Neem Meal my absolute favourite organic base. It seems to attract fewer squirrels, rodents etc. I have used it instead of cottonseed or rapeseed meal for the past five years.
 

Anthony

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Hmm, fermented neem seed meal 6-1-2

Leaucaena l. compost with weeds is what we use for the organic part
of our aged compost NPK is similar to rabbit manure 2.4 - 1.4 - 0.6

Soil mix is 7 inorganic to 3 organic by volume and less for some trees 9 to 1.

Still have to find information on how much N goes into the soil from fermented
seed meal.

So a boost is given with 1/3 strength Miracle Gro lawn fertiliser - should be 12 N 0 P 2 K
once a week into moist soil when there is no rain.
Will eventually test 1/6 strength - 6 N......

Tried compost tea ------- waste ----- elms ended up with dead branches.

Information says too much P can be poisonous to plants.
Thus far, the blend keeps the leaves a healthy deep green, and with the sunlight
short extensions.[ for trees in refinement ]
Not too tasty to normal insects.
Good Day
Anthony
 
Messages
625
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Location
Vancouver Island, British Columbia
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Hmm, fermented neem seed meal 6-1-2

Leaucaena l. compost with weeds is what we use for the organic part
of our aged compost NPK is similar to rabbit manure 2.4 - 1.4 - 0.6

Soil mix is 7 inorganic to 3 organic by volume and less for some trees 9 to 1.

Still have to find information on how much N goes into the soil from fermented
seed meal.

So a boost is given with 1/3 strength Miracle Gro lawn fertiliser - should be 12 N 0 P 2 K
once a week into moist soil when there is no rain.
Will eventually test 1/6 strength - 6 N......

Tried compost tea ------- waste ----- elms ended up with dead branches.

Information says too much P can be poisonous to plants.
Thus far, the blend keeps the leaves a healthy deep green, and with the sunlight
short extensions.[ for trees in refinement ]
Not too tasty to normal insects.
Good Day
Anthony
The product i use is from Reindeer Natural Products in Cowichan Valley BC. referred to as Neem Cake 5-2-4 . It is a base for the mix combining Blood Meal, Bone Meal and Alaska Fish Fertilizer. Not sure about the fermenting aspect. I do know if the grind is rougher some of the seeds germinate! So i would question that we are comparing the same products.
 
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Oh, well. Already ordered Alaska Fish Emulsion.

Can't hurt anything if I mix it with Miracle Gro, right?
You can decide for yourself. Plants cannot distinguish between an organic or synthetic fertilizer – the nutrients are processed in exactly the same way. However, the similarity stops there.

Chemical fertilizers add nutrients to the soil, but they don’t add anything else. Plants needs more than just nutrients to survive. They also need organic matter and living organisms. Synthetic fertilizers do not support microbiological life in the soil. The application of a synthetic fertilizer actually kills a significant percentage of beneficial microorganisms. These tiny creatures are responsible for breaking down organic matter into a stable amendment for improving soil quality and fertility. Some convert nitrogen from the air into a plant useable form.
Compost and organic material introduces beneficial microorganisms. Microorganisms commonly found in soil and compost convert organic nitrogen into inorganic nitrogen, a process called mineralization. Plants may then take up the nutrients released by these. Composts contain an astonishing variety of microbes, many of which may be beneficial in controlling pathogens. Beneficial microbes help to control plant pathogens.
The world is full of choices, Chemical fertilizer versus Organic is one of them.