Natives versus Imported so called - Tropicals.

Anthony

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,561
Likes
7,089
Location
West Indies [ Caribbean ]
USDA Zone
13
#1
Well as you know gentle reader we are dumping practically all of
the trees we brought in from 1980's to the early 1990's.

Why ---- because the local trees and shrubs are out performing the
imports.

Plus most of the imports are not even Tropical, they are Sub-Tropicals,
or like the Sageretia t., can grow outdoors in zone 7.

It would have been so much more sensible if the early books had been
more honest with the locations.
So much time wasted fighting to keep trees healthy.

Fortunately, for example, there is a Caribbean Pine from an island off
of Cuba.
It is out performing the J.B,pine.
Just that it is a hardwood and requires ground growing to get a trunk,
whereas the J.B.pine can build trunks in clay pots.

The lament, why such poor information, why do so many want to
just make money on sales ?
Lies.

Anyhow this is week 2 of fertilising and the weather is still in the
low sixties at night.
The earth/sun shift has taken place and the northern part of the yard
is back in sun, so the temperatures should return to the 70's.

Will be spending time identifying more locals.

BIG THANKS to the one who gave us the information on CELTIS i.
also found out that Jamaica has another Celtis type.
!!!!!!Thank You!!!!!!!:):):):):):):):):):):):):):cool::cool:
Have located the zones where it occurs, now just to get some seed.
Good Day
Anthony

http://tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php?id=Celtis+iguanaea

* now to watch the Celtis battle the Chlorophora for top place
as branchlet king.
 
Messages
714
Likes
669
Location
Wyomissing, PA
USDA Zone
6b
#2
That's interesting Anthony. During the time I entered into bonsai, the late 90s, popular tropical species for bonsai included: Schefflera, Ficus benjamina (and similar looking Ficus species), Ficus nerifolia, Bucida buceras, Brazilian raintree, Serissa foetida, fukien tea, Bougainvillia, Conocarpus erectus and others that are not coming to mind right now. I am surprised you didn't end up with more of these, as I'm sure most would do extremely well in a tropical climate like yours.
 
Messages
843
Likes
1,290
Location
São Paulo, Brazil
USDA Zone
11a
#3
Why ---- because the local trees and shrubs are out performing the
imports.
Well, have you seen my blooming Calliandra from yesterday's post?
I doubt if they would perform like this in Canada or The Netherlands, for instance.
But probably they would feel good in your island!
09BCDA06-2029-414C-900E-F00E5224B47A.jpeg
 

Anthony

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,561
Likes
7,089
Location
West Indies [ Caribbean ]
USDA Zone
13
#4
Messages
843
Likes
1,290
Location
São Paulo, Brazil
USDA Zone
11a
#5
Last edited:
Messages
714
Likes
669
Location
Wyomissing, PA
USDA Zone
6b
#7
For those in Hawaii or in montane tropical locations, I would to see Metrosideros polymorpha (or any species from the genus) used.
 

Anthony

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,561
Likes
7,089
Location
West Indies [ Caribbean ]
USDA Zone
13
#8
@miker ,

Here is an odd one for you. Where we live [ Trinidad ] is so colourful all year round.
That the desire to grow flowering Bonsai, is very, very low.
From the croton, to the poui, to the petrea, to indian laburnum to cassias, to .............................

What I observed away is folk who live in buildings, need Bonsai, folk who
live near forests [ down here ] hardly ever find Bonsai appealing.

In fact what often becomes appealing is the not often seen ------------ like a
deciduous tree [ on our side this happens with lack of rain ] and it is in flushes.
So you admire the leafless, standing by itself.
Good Day
Anthony
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom