Need help identifying a pine

ironliver316

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Got this pine from a local nursery, but the guy couldn't remember what kind it is.
 

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Potawatomi13

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Appears grafted. Possible dwarf Scots Pine or variety of Mugo Pine:). Other than straight appearing trunk has decent branches to work with.
 

River's Edge

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Got this pine from a local nursery, but the guy couldn't remember what kind it is.
Looks very much like " Winter Gold" mugo pine. We have several planted in the yard. The gold colouration is stronger in the fall and winter with a lighter green throughout the spring and summer. New needles appear green and change with the seasons if it is the " Winter Gold" cultivar.
 

Potawatomi13

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Looks very much like " Winter Gold" mugo pine. We have several planted in the yard. The gold colouration is stronger in the fall and winter with a lighter green throughout the spring and summer. New needles appear green and change with the seasons if it is the " Winter Gold" cultivar.
If this is case and is dead of Winter presently......why not actually gold/yellow instead of just Winter color of normal tree?
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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If this is case and is dead of Winter presently......why not actually gold/yellow instead of just Winter color of normal tree?
Winter color on a normal tree tends to turn an even color pale, this tree looks like the foliar tip was dipped in paint. Usually that's a sign of human selection for a certain trait.

I haven't seen any mugo wildtype in my life that naturally goes yellow.
 

River's Edge

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If this is case and is dead of Winter presently......why not actually gold/yellow instead of just Winter color of normal tree?
The creator would have to answer that one! My guess would be to add variety to the landscape. Two pictures, winter gold Mugo and regular Mugo outside January 21, 2022 in the landscape less than 15 feet of distance between them. Same conditions different appearance. And yes they do vary with the degree of cold experienced as well.
 

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ironliver316

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Thanks for all the responses. I was thinking mugo myself, but wasn't sure. Admittedly it doesn't have a great trunk, but it was the only gold one on the property, so I had to grab it. It's gorgeous. The pics don't do it justice. One question, all of the pics I've googled of winter gold mugos, just like River's Edge's, have needles all the way down the branches. Why would mine only have needles at the tips?
 

River's Edge

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Thanks for all the responses. I was thinking mugo myself, but wasn't sure. Admittedly it doesn't have a great trunk, but it was the only gold one on the property, so I had to grab it. It's gorgeous. The pics don't do it justice. One question, all of the pics I've googled of winter gold mugos, just like River's Edge's, have needles all the way down the branches. Why would mine only have needles at the tips?
Trees that are in top condition retain their needles longer. Weaker trees will tend to lose their needles faster. So it will depend on care and maintenance as well as genetic tendency due to species or variety. Pines are often grown in sub optimal conditions such as more shaded locations, poor soil choices, less fertilizer, over watering and thus will tend to have spindly growth as opposed to the lush appearance of healthier specimens.
This is often true of collected trees that are found in challenging environments giving them aged characteristics but weaker foliage. It can take several years to acclimate them and bring them up to a healthier state for Bonsai development.
 

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