Need help identifying fungus.

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I thought that with the end of the spring monsoon, my fungal issues may be lessening. Its been hot and sunny here in middle Tennessee, but still humid. However, I am seeing something come up on multiple leaves on multiple trees and I was hoping someone in the community could help me identify whats going on. Ive narrowed it down to red spot or rust, but then I saw an article talking about how phosphorus deficiency might cause these symptoms. I use organic cottonseed meal and kelp powder supplimented by weekly doses of fish emulsion. All of these trees were also treated for three weeks in the spring with daconil and bonide granular systemic fungicide. All are in full sun. All are in the same area of the bench. I sprayed with Daconil this morning and ill hit them with a granular again this week - would it also be a good idea to quarantine them since it looks kind of like the same issue even though its different species?

1) American Wisteria- this one shows yellowing issues every year but this year has the red stuff.
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2) Blueberry - the red splotches are also on the stem.
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3) Ficus - its weird that these are showing issues as ive never had any problems out of these before. The willow leaf is always in some state of yellow but I noticed its getting.some spottiness now too.
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Leo in N E Illinois

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Anthracnose? Read in resources about maples and anthracnose. My memory is playing tricks, I'll check my blueberry disease book, and get back to you.

Position trees to get better air movement, on benches or posts is better than set on the ground. If you have had really high humidity there is nothing that moving the plant will help with.
 

Tbwilson33

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I’m not sure if ficus can get anthracnose... could be a bunch of things honestly. What’s the chemical on the granular fungicide?
 

0soyoung

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Spraying by itself is of limited benefit if one leaves the infected leaves [sic] hanging around - they are just spore sources for continuing the infection..

Any given fungicide is not effective against every fungi.

But there are things in this story that have an odor about them. First, it seems that @cheap_walmart_art has thrown every readily available fungicide at it to no effect. This ought to make one wonder if it is indeed a fungal problem. Second is this
... with the end of the spring monsoon, my fungal issues may be lessening. Its been hot and sunny here in middle Tennessee, but still humid. However, I am seeing something come up on multiple leaves on multiple trees ...
American Wisteria- this one shows yellowing issues every year
Yellowing foliage is a symptom of root problems, like drowning roots.

When the seasonal monsoons occur one can get the pots out of the rain OR cover the substrate with something like aluminum foil, that will keep much of the rain water from getting into it. Alternatively, one can prop up one side of the pot and change which side every few days to assure that the roots remain above the saturation zone of the substrate.



To spell it out, I think you've got root anoxia from weeks of too much water/rain. An ounce of prevention ...

If so, you've got many weeks of weak plants teetering on the brink before vigor returns, @cheap_walmart_art.
It is a vicious circle, loose roots --> loose leaves --> loose more roots --> that must be broken so that somehow they again gain roots --> gain leaves --> gain roots --> gain more leaves --> gain more roots, etc., and trunks thicken and stems extend, blah, blah, blah.
 

fredman

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Also when using organic feeding, stay away from any chemical sprays, drenches and chemical fertilizer. The organics feeds the organisms (not the tree) and the chemicals disrupts the environment they're living in.
There might be beneficial fungi living and working with the microbes in the soil. The cides will kill some and/or send others into dormancy.
Also when damage has been done because of chemicals, the first ones to bounce back are the pathogenic ones...!
 
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Spraying by itself is of limited benefit if one leaves the infected leaves [sic] hanging around - they are just spore sources for continuing the infection..

Any given fungicide is not effective against every fungi.

But there are things in this story that have an odor about them. First, it seems that @cheap_walmart_art has thrown every readily available fungicide at it to no effect. This ought to make one wonder if it is indeed a fungal problem. Second is this

Yellowing foliage is a symptom of root problems, like drowning roots.

When the seasonal monsoons occur one can get the pots out of the rain OR cover the substrate with something like aluminum foil, that will keep much of the rain water from getting into it. Alternatively, one can prop up one side of the pot and change which side every few days to assure that the roots remain above the saturation zone of the substrate.



To spell it out, I think you've got root anoxia from weeks of too much water/rain. An ounce of prevention ...

If so, you've got many weeks of weak plants teetering on the brink before vigor returns, @cheap_walmart_art.
It is a vicious circle, loose roots --> loose leaves --> loose more roots --> that must be broken so that somehow they again gain roots --> gain leaves --> gain roots --> gain more leaves --> gain more roots, etc., and trunks thicken and stems extend, blah, blah, blah.

See, I thought the same thing with the wisteria so this year at bud swell I repotted it into a much more free draining soil. Looked like it was in a mix of turface and potting soil when I got it and now I have it in 2:1:1 DE, pumice and lava rock. I'll get the infected tissue off of everything tomorrow and see if that helps to mitigate some of this.
 

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