Need help with Jaboticaba bonsai

HeatherR

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Does anyone know exactly what type of soil should I use to repot a Jaboticaba bonsai tree? What about using Kanuma, since Jaboticabas need acidic ph?
If anyone has any information that can help me out, I would really appreciate it!
Thanks!
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Kanuma would work well. If you have kanuma, use kanuma. Jabuticaba (also spelled Jaboticaba) is fairly tolerant of soil pH, it does best in a mildly acidic soil, but as a commercial fruit can be grown in limestone derived soils in Brazil. Jabuticaba adapts well to a range of soil types.

For bonsai purposes, if you have Kanuma on hand, it is a perfectly acceptable. Akadama would work well too. And just about any mix that works for maples or azalea will be just fine.

Jaboticaba, is in the genus Plinia. Related genera are Eugenia and Psidium (the culinary Guava are in genus Psidium). Eugenia are also popular as tropical bonsai specimens.
 

HeatherR

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Kanuma would work well. If you have kanuma, use kanuma. Jabuticaba (also spelled Jaboticaba) is fairly tolerant of soil pH, it does best in a mildly acidic soil, but as a commercial fruit can be grown in limestone derived soils in Brazil. Jabuticaba adapts well to a range of soil types.

For bonsai purposes, if you have Kanuma on hand, it is a perfectly acceptable. Akadama would work well too. And just about any mix that works for maples or azalea will be just fine.

Jaboticaba, is in the genus Plinia. Related genera are Eugenia and Psidium (the culinary Guava are in genus Psidium). Eugenia are also popular as tropical bonsai specimens.
Leo, thank you so much for your help. I have searched and searched the internet, and haven't had much luck in finding information pertaining to the best type of soil mix for a Jabuticaba bonsai.
I have a Chinese Elm bonsai, and I just recently acquired this Jabuticaba bonsai. Little did I know finding information on the Jabuticaba would be would be harder than I thought!
Thank you again for responding. Your advice has helped me out a lot!
 

sorce

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Welcome to Crazy!

I find it easier to use a soil first approach, if it grows in your soil, grow it, if not, throw it.

I use Napa #8822 FloorDry, because even after the Apocalypse, I'll be able to find some.

Sorce
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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@HeatherR - To expand on the post from my friend @sorce , Napa 8822 is fossilized diatomaceous earth. It is a stone that is almost entirely silica, meaning chemically inert, and has a very fine pore structure to its particles. My caution is that the particle size of Napa 8822 is too fine to mix with Akadama or Kanuma. The Napa product is available from auto parts stores. But I do not use it as its particle size is too small. I have not been able to find a source for a larger particle fossilized diatomaceous earth.

A better mix is to use pumice, pumice with Akadama, or pumice with Kanuma. You can use both the Japanese products "straight up", though for various reasons most of us use mixes or blends of several components. I like 100% Kanuma for my azalea. I use mixes for everything else.

Potting mixes tend to be very individual. I highly recommend using a sieve to remove fines from your potting mix. Anything that goes through a piece of window screen is too fine to use for bonsai or any houseplant in a flower pot.

Many, many different soil mixes will work if you can water them correctly. I like a mix that lets me get away with watering every third day. This allows me a long weekend for travel without having to hire someone to come water my trees. Most exhibition bonsai are potted in mixes that require daily watering. This means a team of people are required to keep the tree properly watered.

I don't want to make the topic of potting media too complicated, but it is the most technical aspect of bonsai horticulture. And it is an aspect of bonsai horticulture that is continually evolving. Products that are available today are nothing at all like what was used 40 years ago. There is a constant evolution of this aspect of the hobby.
 

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