Neem Oil as Pesticide/Fungicide - Correct Use

Brian Underwood

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So, I have been told Neem Oil is somewhat of a all-in-one for pesticide needs. Judging from the results I have heard from my fellow students, this is probably true. I would like to know what everyone's experiences with it have been, as well as proper application. Is it sprayed, systemic, diluted? Thanks!
 

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sean f

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i usually spray the foliage i have had alot of mite problems in the past,but none since i started using neem,
 

treebeard55

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In my experience, it works pretty well, tho I don't expect it to knock 'em all flat in a day, like DDT! It takes a few days, and a repeat or two may be needed. I've used it only as a spray, usually as part of a "cocktail."

I understand that elms and trident maples don't tolerate it well, tho other maples apparently do.

There are also claims that it repels Japanese beetles, but I have yet to test those claims for myself.
 

Gnome

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Brian,

Last year I tried it as a replacement for Daconil in the treatment of black spot fungus on a Chinese Elm that is annually effected. I found it to be ineffective for this application and had to revert to the Daconil. It does seem to be effective against Aphids but, as treebeard55 noted, repeated applications were necessary.

Norm
 

Brian Van Fleet

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I use it for aphids, but that's about it.
 

DaveV

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Gnome, a product called INFUSE is great for black spot on Chinese Elms. It is a systemic fungicide that you spray on the leaves. I have been using it for the past 3 years. You want to use it before you have an outbreak.

DaveV.
 

jk_lewis

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I would like to know . . . as well as proper application. Is it sprayed, systemic, diluted? Thanks!
There's only one "expert" here: READ THE LABEL


And be careful. The jury is still out as to the real human safety on this pesticide. I do not use it. A Pyrethrin spray is fine for me.
 

Gnome

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Gnome, a product called INFUSE is great for black spot on Chinese Elms. It is a systemic fungicide that you spray on the leaves. I have been using it for the past 3 years. You want to use it before you have an outbreak.

DaveV.
Thanks Dave, I still have a fair amount of the Daconil left as I actually use very little of it but I'll store the info away.

Norm
 

Brian Underwood

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Thanks everyone! I think I'll give it a shot. Anyone have something else they like to use? Perhaps something you SWEAR BY? Also, I have scale on a few of my trees, so something that will kill those little bastards would be nice.
 

Bill S

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Brian the best way to get scale is roll up the sleves and go to it, a needle or the tip of your pruners will get them easily, pick it off and squish it. Fun and therapy getting rid of those little bumps. at least no pesticide issues that way.
Although it might come down to just how much fun and therapy you get out of it, might tell you to get help.:D
 

Brian Underwood

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Haha, sounds good. I will pick them off, then spray with the neem oil to prevent re-infestation. That should do it...
 

Austinhoyt

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This is a good option.
It is non toxic to humans, birds, earthworms or animals. Being an oil it can affect bees if it is actually sprayed on them so it is recommended to use it when bees are not visiting. Once the spray has settled it will not hurt the bees.
 

fore

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Scale killed a tree of mine last year. I tried systemic insecticides (Bayer product) but never got ahead of them. So kill what you can manually, I found it hard to find 'all' of them. Does Neem oil also kill them? This is one of my "arch enemies" lol
 

jk_lewis

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It is non toxic to humans, birds, earthworms or animals.
And you have that quite dogmatic information based on WHAT authority? I'd surely love a citation.
 

iant

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I had quite a bit of scale on a Seiju elm this spring and sprayed it once with a dilute Neem oil spray and it worked perfectly. All of the scale dead after 1 application 4 weeks ago. Hasn't come back.
 

edprocoat

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JKl, I read where Neem Oil is basically Non Toxic to most animals and people, in fact in India it has been used in various forms for its medicinal properties for centuries, from everything like acne to fever. It was proven when fed to laboratory rats for several weeks to cause 100% reversible sterility, and should not be consumed by women who are pregnant, trying to become pregnant, nursing or children, it also has been found to be an abortifactent when consumed by pregnant rats. In India its been used as in Teas, used as a poultice and just eaten for varying purposes. Its made by pressing or boiling and pressure extraction of the seeds and fruits of Neem trees, and therefore varies greatly in the concentration between the various methods of obtaining the oils.

ed
 

Eric Schrader

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Neem oil is a contact spray for insects and mites, it has no systemic effect so a soil drench wont do any good, probably will damage the roots in high enough concentration. I use it to control aphids, scale and wood lice but it only knocks them back, not totally out. I had a spider mite outbreak recently and realized that the neem had been keeping them suppressed but not killed them totally. I made a cocktail of neem and Isotox at full strength and use that to spray all the trees since spider mites are so infectious. I also use neem as a fungal control - but I rotate it with Daconil and Copper, often using the neem as a spreading agent for the latter two. I don't think that the neem alone really controls fungal problems, I've been battling Anthracnose for the last year. I find it to be a good component of fungal and insect control but not a 3-in-1 miracle product that some labels imply.
 

Bill S

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I started using Bayer Advanced Tree and Shrub (a systemic) last year and had 0 issues with bugs. It's a granular you sprinkle on and water in 1 time / year. I usually get a scale outbreak with my trops inside around this time of year and everything looks good.
 

BrianBay9

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I suppose some oils may have toxic effects on insects, but my understanding is that neem oil and most other oils used for pest control work by blocking the bugs respiratory system....physically clogging little holes (spiricules) in the exoskeleton. Consequently the oil has to make contact with the bugs, and takes some time to have an effect. Because of this mechanism of action, oils work on all bugs, and probably have no effect on fungi. If the treatment is not totally effective, it's probably because it's very hard to ensure you cover all the bugs in all their stages, covering the underside of foliage and limbs, etc.

Brian
 
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