New better Product on the market to replace Akadama

Sakadama

Sapling
Messages
33
Reaction score
16
I am currently promoting a new replacement product for Akadama. This product is called Sakadama (SA in this name stands for South African). Sakadama is almost the same as Akadama in terms of soil composition, but because the soil is heated to 600 degrees it acquires a number of properties that are very interesting for Bonsai. I am looking for companies all over Europe that buy Akadama on a large scale for their own use or resale and for whom Sakadama could be of interest. Who can refer me to one or more companies that could be interesting to contact?



In short the benefits of Sakadama:

Like Akadama, this soil has a volcanic origin. It has almost the same composition as Akadama.

Sakadama is heated to 600 degrees Celsius. The product loses about 40% in mass during the heating process. Due to the heating to 600 degrees Celsius, Sakadama becomes a lot harder than the standard Akadama and therefore has a longer shelf life (1 to 2 times as long as the current forecasts).

Sakadama retains 20% more moisture and promotes root growth and development of the Bonsai tree.

Another big advantage is that because Sakadama is harder, you don't have to remove the entire root ball when repotting. It ensures that the substrate can remain in the root ball longer to promote microbial activity.

Because Sakadama is harder, it has less breakage during transport.

For the people who want to know the figures behind this new product, I have added the product sheet.


I would like to hear from you. Thanks in advance.
 

Attachments

  • 1633614388019.png
    1633614388019.png
    318 bytes · Views: 55

Glaucus

Mame
Messages
219
Reaction score
306
Location
Netherlands
USDA Zone
7b
This is kind of an ad, but I also always thought it makes sense to look for substrates similar to akadama and kanuma, but closer to home. There are volcanoes and geologies similar to Japan, outside Japan itself. But it is only mined in Japan because of the bonsai hobby being dominant there. South Africa isn't really that much closer to Europe or NA, though. Of course, people do bonsai in Africa as well. I am not an expert in geology or volcanic deposits and substrates, or how they may be mined. But the western US has volcanoes. So have some parts of Europe. It makes sense to source these products closer from home.
 

Canada Bonsai

Shohin
Messages
375
Reaction score
968
PM sent

I would need to test any new substrate for 2-3 years minimum before even considering distribution. I hope other companies will feel the same. Before testing, I'd like a lot more info. Have you had the particles analyzed in a lab?

Thank you
 

Leo in N E Illinois

The Professor
Messages
10,299
Reaction score
20,400
Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
There are volcanic deposits in USA and British Columbia that have the potential to yield Akadama and Kanuma like products. The reason there are no "Akadama Mines" in Washington or Oregon state is that it is simply too expensive to quarry "dirt" for a market as small as bonsai. At least in USA.
 

Maiden69

Chumono
Messages
615
Reaction score
714
Location
Boerne, TX
USDA Zone
8b
So... a n akadama that is pretty much baked into turface? At 600 C you're pretty much losing all the real benefits of akadama, and only gaining longevity.
 

rockm

Spuds Moyogi
Messages
11,289
Reaction score
15,814
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
Um, this IS kind of an ad...the person joined today and posted this today...

If you're reading--a few questions--got any trees growing in it? How long? Pictures?

Also, any ideas about pricing? Given the shipping from the port of Durban in S.Africa is 9916 nautical miles to Baltimore, for instance, freight is not going to be cheap...
 

rockm

Spuds Moyogi
Messages
11,289
Reaction score
15,814
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
So... a n akadama that is pretty much baked into turface? At 600 C you're pretty much losing all the real benefits of akadama, and only gaining longevity.
FWIW, triple red lined Akadama from Japan was fired. Doesn't break down...I had a few bags of it. Wouldn't crush in your fingers...It would not break down in a pot over five years...I don't think it's being made any more though
 

Maiden69

Chumono
Messages
615
Reaction score
714
Location
Boerne, TX
USDA Zone
8b
FWIW, triple red lined Akadama from Japan was fired. Doesn't break down...I had a few bags of it. Wouldn't crush in your fingers...It would not break down in a pot over five years...I don't think it's being made any more though
From the little research I have, one of the best characteristics for akadama is the breaking down process. Allows roots to grow through it as they do through organic material as pine bark, without the decomposing of the organic material. This allows for more water to be held as more roots fill the pot. This one will be just like turface, which @markyscott tested already on his inorganic soils thread.

I wish someone will start mining those deposits in the NW... But, knowing the little bit I do about the US market, if they do mine it, it will be as expensive, if not more than the imported one.
 

rockm

Spuds Moyogi
Messages
11,289
Reaction score
15,814
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
From the little research I have, one of the best characteristics for akadama is the breaking down process. Allows roots to grow through it as they do through organic material as pine bark, without the decomposing of the organic material. This allows for more water to be held as more roots fill the pot. This one will be just like turface, which @markyscott tested already on his inorganic soils thread.

I wish someone will start mining those deposits in the NW... But, knowing the little bit I do about the US market, if they do mine it, it will be as expensive, if not more than the imported one.
Yeah, That's true, but the high fired stuff retained good Cation Exchange Capacity because it remained porous and supported the soil mix around it. "Regular" akadama breaks down for me extremely quickly because of freeze expansion in the winter.
 

Maiden69

Chumono
Messages
615
Reaction score
714
Location
Boerne, TX
USDA Zone
8b
Yeah, That's true, but the high fired stuff retained good Cation Exchange Capacity because it remained porous and supported the soil mix around it. "Regular" akadama breaks down for me extremely quickly because of freeze expansion in the winter.
I think it also depends on the brand, I read here of a few guys that have the freeze/thaw cycles and still have good results with it. There is a guy in Spain (David Cortizas) that did a test with akadama and other replacement particles and percentages of akadama. I think the test lasted almost 2 years. He used cuttings from the same ficus tree, the ones with the most akadama had tight ramification and short internodes compared with everything else. Even cuttings that had 80% akadama and 30% pumice had longer internodes. He uses 70% akadama / 30% kyriu as that's what the nursery he studies in Japan used, that mix also had better refinement properties than the one with pumice, but the one with pumice had stronger growth. I am using clay products now to develop, and saving the akadama I have only for refinement trees. I don't see a benefit in developing a tree in a media that will slow down the growth, once the bones are in, definitely.
 

RKMcGinnis

Shohin
Messages
448
Reaction score
447
Location
Canton, Georgia
USDA Zone
7a
I think it also depends on the brand, I read here of a few guys that have the freeze/thaw cycles and still have good results with it. There is a guy in Spain (David Cortizas) that did a test with akadama and other replacement particles and percentages of akadama. I think the test lasted almost 2 years. He used cuttings from the same ficus tree, the ones with the most akadama had tight ramification and short internodes compared with everything else. Even cuttings that had 80% akadama and 30% pumice had longer internodes. He uses 70% akadama / 30% kyriu as that's what the nursery he studies in Japan used, that mix also had better refinement properties than the one with pumice, but the one with pumice had stronger growth. I am using clay products now to develop, and saving the akadama I have only for refinement trees. I don't see a benefit in developing a tree in a media that will slow down the growth, once the bones are in, definitely.
I wasn’t aware that soil could directly effect internode length. That’s interesting. Could that be with only specific species?
 

Maiden69

Chumono
Messages
615
Reaction score
714
Location
Boerne, TX
USDA Zone
8b
I wasn’t aware that soil could directly effect internode length. That’s interesting. Could that be with only specific species?
No, that is something that Ryan Neil and a lot other artists have been advocating for a long time. That is why Ryan states that you should not use akadama when you are developing trees.
 

RKMcGinnis

Shohin
Messages
448
Reaction score
447
Location
Canton, Georgia
USDA Zone
7a
No, that is something that Ryan Neil and a lot other artists have been advocating for a long time. That is why Ryan states that you should not use akadama when you are developing trees.
Interesting, Now that you say that. I think I remember him saying that in a video he was explaining akadama and showing how roots grow straight through it. Glad I asked that question.
 

Colorado

Omono
Messages
1,633
Reaction score
3,394
Location
Denver, Colorado
USDA Zone
5b
Interesting post.

There is an “Oregon Akadama Project” … and I am not sure if that is the official name or if it even has an official name … Ryan has stated that spring 2022 he will be utilizing the “Oregon Akadama” for the first time.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom