New Japanese Pot

Alex DeRuiter

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Found this a couple days ago at a Goodwill, of all places. Thought it looked interesting, so I bought it for $3. Worth it? It has some odd build-up on the sides, but I've been clearing it off with a wire brush. Does anyone recognize the stamp? It looks like an ink stamp, so it probably isn't anything special. Thoughts?

I thought it'd be fun to use a Japan Open disc golf tournament disc for a size comparison :D (hope I'm not the only disc golfer here...lol)




 
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Well, two things I can tell you. This wasn't originally made to be a Bonsai pot, those holes were clearly drilled post fire. And it's export pottery, stuff for sale to tourists or for mass export to other countries(this is clear from the totes lack of kanji or japanese writing in the stamp.). Ink stamps and sigs do not mean a pot is less valuable, in any case, however. An embossed stamp is no indicator of value either. Only what the stamp says determines value!
Ryan
http://japanesepots.wordpress.com/
 

jk_lewis

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It was probably made as a shallow tray to sit on a desk or table to hold small objects -- cards, paper clips, keys, etc. Somebody, somewhere drilled the holes. These "Made in Japan" stamps often date from the Occupation just after WWII.

Interesting find. It looks to be about 6 inches wide????? Maybe you could use it for an accent that flowers. Or, if you have a bonsai with white flowers.
 

Alex DeRuiter

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Gastro, thank you for the information. I noticed the chipped paint but didn't even think to associate that with a post-fire drilling. And yes, like you and jkl pointed out, the fact that the stamp is in English indicates it was most likely produced for sale to tourists.

I appreciate your response, and it's funny you posted your link when you did, because I had been checking your website out for hours that night before looking at this response. I absolutely love your website! I could spend much more time reading through it if I didn't have to work (though I guarantee that much time at work will be spent reading through it).

Jkl, I can see what you're talking about. Are/were containers like this common in Japan for such use? If I were to take clearer pictures, would it be easier to determine whether or not it came from the occupation of Japan shortly after WWII?

Thank you -- I was surprised to find it where I did. Yes, it's about 6-8 inches wide. I have a couple Chinese flowering quines, but I also got a Japanese flowering quince that I believe pushes white flowers -- I haven't seen it in bloom yet, so I'll have to wait until next year. I'll keep the pot regardless, and that will give me some time to continue cleaning it up.

Thanks for the input :D
 

garywood

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Axman, there is a whole subculture that has emerged collecting Japanese pottery in general and especially the occupation era. I don't think yours is Sumida gawa which is one of the more desirable ones. Enjoy
Wood
 
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