New Juniper

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Chumono
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I went out today on a study break and picked this up from Bonsai Beginnings in Savannah, Georgia. I haven't messed with it yet and probably won't for a while until I decide a definite course of action, but here are a couple pictures for you guys. What do you think? Trunk - 3 inches, height - 15 inches.


I'll probably edit this with more pictures, but here are a couple quick ones from what I think will be the front.

IMG_20130706_175359_632[1].jpgIMG_20130706_175310_507[2].jpg
 

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tmmason10

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Wow nice juniper, I would say you've done well. It looks to have a nice old base, some pruning and wiring and voila you should have a good shape.
 

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Wow nice juniper, I would say you've done well. It looks to have a nice old base, some pruning and wiring and voila you should have a good shape.

Thanks! I am not even sure when wiring/branch pruning should take place with junipers, but I am going to let it sit for a while until I decide exactly what I want to do. I already have a mental image, I just need to find the right branches to keep and ones to remove. The good news is that it isn't going anywhere, so there's no rush!
 

october

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Beautiful tree! I assume the tree was inside for pic purposes. This tree must remain outside to survive. Also, like lots of junipers now a days, this one appears to be a little weak as far as health. However, it could be the pic. A tree like this, in peak health, would command a pretty good price.

Spring is best for repotting and styling. However, it should be one or the other, one year you style and the next repot. If it is in bad soil, then repotting is a priority. You can do some work in Fall as well. I wouldn't really do much now except cut all the dead off and maybe growth growing in the notches and crevices. Also, growth growing underneath branches. This will let some light and air in. I would love to see more pics of this beauty.

Rob
 

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Chumono
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Beautiful tree! I assume the tree was inside for pic purposes. This tree must remain outside to survive. Also, like lots of junipers now a days, this one appears to be a little weak as far as health. However, it could be the pic. A tree like this, in peak health, would command a pretty good price.

Spring is best for repotting and styling. However, it should be one or the other, one year you style and the next repot. If it is in bad soil, then repotting is a priority. You can do some work in Fall as well. I wouldn't really do much now except cut all the dead off and maybe growth growing in the notches and crevices. Also, growth growing underneath branches. This will let some light and air in. I would love to see more pics of this beauty.

Rob
Thanks for the kind words! I have been working on my eye, and it's nice to know that it starting to be in tune with the more experienced posters here.

The tree is inside because I brought it home, set it on the table, and took pics for you guys. I cleaned some crap out of the pot and got most of the moss off of the trunk and then took it outside. I can get you more pictures when I get back home. It is worth mentioning that it is procumbens, not shimpaku.
 

John Ruger

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That is a beautiful tree...good luck with it.
 

Ris

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Now this is good material to enhance a skillful eye.
A little unhealthy but a quick fix will sure help, I as if it were mine:rolleyes:
First place it on concret and fill water over flowing and see how long it takes to drain.
If drainage is good scrape a little soil of the top and place a little organic mix on that will regain more green foliage. Can't wait to see more;)

Rishi.
 

Ris

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Do you think you would graft shimpaku later on?
 

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Now this is good material to enhance a skillful eye.
A little unhealthy but a quick fix will sure help, I as if it were mine:rolleyes:
First place it on concret and fill water over flowing and see how long it takes to drain.
If drainage is good scrape a little soil of the top and place a little organic mix on that will regain more green foliage. Can't wait to see more;)

Rishi.
I'll give this a try tomorrow and report back.
That is a beautiful tree...good luck with it.
Thanks!
thats an awesome tree. nice find.
Thanks a lot!
Do you think you would graft shimpaku later on?

It is possible, but I would have to do it under someone else's tutelage.
 

jk_lewis

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Thanks! I am not even sure when wiring/branch pruning should take place with junipers, but I am going to let it sit for a while until I decide exactly what I want to do. I already have a mental image, I just need to find the right branches to keep and ones to remove. The good news is that it isn't going anywhere, so there's no rush!

If you don't know these kinds of things, PLEASE don't use this tree as a learning tool!!!!!!! It is much too nice to be ruined by the hands of a neophyte. Go to a nursery and get and torture a $20 juniper for a couple of years while you just water this one as needed. Join a club.
 

Nybonsai12

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If you don't know these kinds of things, PLEASE don't use this tree as a learning tool!!!!!!! It is much too nice to be ruined by the hands of a neophyte. Go to a nursery and get and torture a $20 juniper for a couple of years while you just water this one as needed. Join a club.

Made me think of this guy
 

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Vance Wood

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I agree, this is a very nice tree and a once in a lifetime find----it's that good. In the right hands this tree could be made into something worth thousands of dollars, in the wrong hands---into kindling. Learn first how to make it prosper then learn how to make it shine.
 

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Chumono
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If you don't know these kinds of things, PLEASE don't use this tree as a learning tool!!!!!!! It is much too nice to be ruined by the hands of a neophyte. Go to a nursery and get and torture a $20 juniper for a couple of years while you just water this one as needed. Join a club.
There used to be a club down here in savannah, but I don't think there is anymore. That's what Bill said at least. I'll use my reply to Vance to cover most of what you said since you guys are basically saying the same thing.

Made me think of this guy
No, I agree with them. Although I don't know how flattering 'neophyte' is, I wouldn't want to mess up a tree (or anything in life for that matter) by trying to work on it when I don't have the required knowledge or experience to do an adequate job.

I agree, this is a very nice tree and a once in a lifetime find----it's that good. In the right hands this tree could be made into something worth thousands of dollars, in the wrong hands---into kindling. Learn first how to make it prosper then learn how to make it shine.


I am more than content to let it sit until I feel comfortable with it. I'll have to make a trip to get some antifungal to apply. I know that there is another thread dealing with a seemingly large outbreak of spider mites as well. I may do what jkl suggested and buy a little juniper from a box store or something and see what I can get away with with it. I actually went up there looking for something more forgiving, like a trident, but this one just attracted me. I thought the tree was good looking, but I think that I don't have enough experience with real peoples' collections to realize that this was that nice of a find. I guess it is easy to get spoiled by the endless beautiful trees that are visible online, as well as the ones that many of you guys own.
 

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Wow really nice material! Please keep us updated over the years.
Mp

Will do!

Here are a couple more pictures, as requested. I got a shot from each side, and a shot of the back + view of the trunk from the back. There is an open area in the back that needs to be filled in. If there is any certain view anyone wants, I will try and get it upon request.

IMG_20130707_161917_870[1].jpgIMG_20130707_161845_879[1].jpgIMG_20130707_161832_327[1].jpgIMG_20130707_161819_956[1].jpgIMG_20130707_161744_591[1].jpg
 

october

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With these new pics, the tree does appear to be in relatively good shape. This is an old tree that was worked with for awhile. You can tell by the foliage. The foliage is quite mature (difficult to achieve with this variety) and organized. This is something that comes with working not only the top portion of the tree, but also working with the root system over the years. This is an outstanding procumbens. One of the better ones that I have seen on this forum. I wish you lots of luck and do not hesitate to post more pics or ask questions about it. You have a tree that will only get better in the next 100-200 years.

Rob
 

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Chumono
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With these new pics, the tree does appear to be in relatively good shape. This is an old tree that was worked with for awhile. You can tell by the foliage. The foliage is quite mature (difficult to achieve with this variety) and organized. This is something that comes with working not only the top portion of the tree, but also working with the root system over the years. This is an outstanding procumbens. One of the better ones that I have seen on this forum. I wish you lots of luck and do not hesitate to post more pics or ask questions about it. You have a tree that will only get better in the next 100-200 years.

Rob

I'll get right to work on figuring out how to make myself live that long so I can see it progress! :p

I'll definitely be careful with the tree until I feel that I am qualified (or am able to access a qualified individual) to help me work on it. With that said, removing the foliage growing straight down, removing dead material, taking a peek at the soil, and spraying fungicide as needed are a few things that are on my to-do list. I need to learn a bit about everything else before I touch the tree. I feel that a more talented enthusiast could probably wire the tree as it sits now and end up with a beautiful tree.


I'm going to turn the tables on you and say that if you think of anything that you think I should know about the tree, please don't hesitate to let me know. I know a tiny bit about junipers, but my interest has always been with deciduous trees and so I haven't paid as much attention to the species as I should have.


And to end the post, I did think of a question. Moss should be removed from the soil except when showing, correct? Doesn't it negatively effect the drainage capabilities of the soil?
Also, in picture 4 above, if you look just to the right of where the trunks split, you can see a few mold/fungus-like projections (little white dots). I was told that this was just due to the old bark being left on the tree and being wet from all the rain, which made sense. Should I remove the old bark with a toothbrush or something?
 
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october

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Moss is good for exhibitions. However, in general, not really good to leave on all the time. It should be removed before winter. It can hold excess moisture and pest/disease etc. As far as the white, you could try a toothbrush and water. However, the bark is kind of flaky. Some like the look of this sort of bark. That being the case, you would need to be careful not to scrape off the flaky bark.

Scale insects resemble those white dots. However, I doubt they are scale. Scale insects are small sucking insects. Usually, on junipers, they are small white oval/round like dots. They mostly get on the foliage in between needles and foliage crevices. This is something to watch for. The other thing is mites. Signs of mites are parts of the tree going pale and fine webbing in the interiors. Scale insects do not make this webbing. If you suspect mites, lightly shake some of the foliage over a white piece of paper. If you see small things scurrying around, it is mites.

Fungal diseases usually begin with abrupt sections turning brown, it spreads very fast and you will notice it spreading every few days.

If you see any of these issues, post what you are seeing so it can be delt with immediately.

Rob
 

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Chumono
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Moss is good for exhibitions. However, in general, not really good to leave on all the time. It should be removed before winter. It can hold excess moisture and pest/disease etc. As far as the white, you could try a toothbrush and water. However, the bark is kind of flaky. Some like the look of this sort of bark. That being the case, you would need to be careful not to scrape off the flaky bark.

Scale insects resemble those white dots. However, I doubt they are scale. Scale insects are small sucking insects. Usually, on junipers, they are small white oval/round like dots. They mostly get on the foliage in between needles and foliage crevices. This is something to watch for. The other thing is mites. Signs of mites are parts of the tree going pale and fine webbing in the interiors. Scale insects do not make this webbing. If you suspect mites, lightly shake some of the foliage over a white piece of paper. If you see small things scurrying around, it is mites.

Fungal diseases usually begin with abrupt sections turning brown, it spreads very fast and you will notice it spreading every few days.

If you see any of these issues, post what you are seeing so it can be delt with immediately.

Rob

Thanks for all the information! According to this, I don't see anything to be worried about. I will see if I can remove the small white spore-like things and remove the moss for now. I'll post back later if I find anything concerning, but it looks good to me!
 

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