New plant.

Munch9

Yamadori
Messages
94
Reaction score
85
Location
Curitiba - Brazil
USDA Zone
10a
IMG-20211115-WA0038.jpeg
Just got this Acer Kaede, thinking about shortening the trunks and keep it as a little tree, how is back budding on these plants?
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
31,836
Reaction score
43,731
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
I reckon another year of good growth would be worth it if you really need buds that aren't there now.

Otherwise it'll just grow what's there in more of a desperation move.

Hell, another good year may have it pop it's own buds. That's the health tell for me. If it ain't showing, it ain't growing.

Sorce
 

Munch9

Yamadori
Messages
94
Reaction score
85
Location
Curitiba - Brazil
USDA Zone
10a
I reckon another year of good growth would be worth it if you really need buds that aren't there now.

Otherwise it'll just grow what's there in more of a desperation move.

Hell, another good year may have it pop it's own buds. That's the health tell for me. If it ain't showing, it ain't growing.

Sorce
The best time to cut then really hard is just after winter, am I right?
 

Munch9

Yamadori
Messages
94
Reaction score
85
Location
Curitiba - Brazil
USDA Zone
10a
Acti
View attachment 408218
Just got this Acer Kaede, thinking about shortening the trunks and keep it as a little tree, how is back budding on these plants?
actually, Im not sure if it really is a Kaede, I would love some help identifiying this.
 

Attachments

  • image.jpg
    image.jpg
    139.4 KB · Views: 11
  • image.jpg
    image.jpg
    144.6 KB · Views: 12

Shibui

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,092
Reaction score
9,676
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
I just searched 'kaede' and found that it just means maple.
The leaves appear to be alternate so I guess it is an Acer but not sure what species. It does not look like either Japanese maple, trident maple or Acer japonicum. There may be other Acers from Japan but I'm not aware of them.

The leaves in the 2 photos you have posted appear to be different plants??
 

Munch9

Yamadori
Messages
94
Reaction score
85
Location
Curitiba - Brazil
USDA Zone
10a
I just searched 'kaede' and found that it just means maple.
The leaves appear to be alternate so I guess it is an Acer but not sure what species. It does not look like either Japanese maple, trident maple or Acer japonicum. There may be other Acers from Japan but I'm not aware of them.

The leaves in the 2 photos you have posted appear to be different plants??
They are different plants but they come from the same pot, I just saved both from a wrecked pot.
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
31,836
Reaction score
43,731
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
So midsummer is the best?

Please note my good heart chuckling with joy.

Your excitement as a "newbie scissors hands" has me noting this other phenomenon that muddies a forum's communication waters.

Because it would be excellent for you to identify it yourself and I am curious to how wholly you may be able to identify this phenomenon....

If you read back my answers, are you able to see it?

Not trying to catch you up, totally sincere, I'll fill you in if you don't get it.

Thanks!

Sorce
 

Munch9

Yamadori
Messages
94
Reaction score
85
Location
Curitiba - Brazil
USDA Zone
10a
Please note my good heart chuckling with joy.

Your excitement as a "newbie scissors hands" has me noting this other phenomenon that muddies a forum's communication waters.

Because it would be excellent for you to identify it yourself and I am curious to how wholly you may be able to identify this phenomenon....

If you read back my answers, are you able to see it?

Not trying to catch you up, totally sincere, I'll fill you in if you don't get it.

Thanks!

Sorce
All seriouness, Im sorry, english isnt my first language
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
31,836
Reaction score
43,731
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
All seriouness, Im sorry, english isnt my first language

Lol!

I don't think it matters!

I just said the same thing twice.

It depends on your goals what time of year to cut.

It depends how fast you want to reach your goals as to what year you do this in.
Waiting 4 years, is faster.

Sorce
 

Munch9

Yamadori
Messages
94
Reaction score
85
Location
Curitiba - Brazil
USDA Zone
10a
Identification app that I use, said it is a Acre Rubrum, but still in doubt
 

rodeolthr

Shohin
Messages
266
Reaction score
284
Location
Seattle, WA
USDA Zone
8a
Is it possible that this is abutilon....Flowering Maple? Not a true maple, but related to hibiscus and hollyhock in the mallow family.
 

Munch9

Yamadori
Messages
94
Reaction score
85
Location
Curitiba - Brazil
USDA Zone
10a
Is it possible that this is abutilon....Flowering Maple? Not a true maple, but related to hibiscus and hollyhock in the mallow family.
I thought the same, but in close inspection they seem very different, I compared with a abutilon that I saw in the street.
 

dbonsaiw

Chumono
Messages
518
Reaction score
489
Location
New York
USDA Zone
7b
As for when to cut, your general choices are late winter/early spring before bud break or about 8 weeks later in the beginning of summer. If you cut right before bud break, you will get very aggressive growth as all the energy stored in the roots has nowhere to go other than in new shoots. This is great for growing the next section of the trunk, but will produce large internodal distances. Once the buds have broken, your tree has already expended tremendous energy reserves and needs its leaves to produce more energy through photosynthesis. The tree is weak and needs to wait till it refuels in summer for the cut. This cut will produce slower growth, but the internodes will be shorter.

I tend to agree that this could use a little more growing before a cut, but that's somewhat personal preference. A trunk chop usually means you are satisfied with the general thickness of the base of the trunk and want to start developing the bonsai. Some general rules of proportion are helpful in this regard: The proportion of the base of your trunk to the height of your tree should be between 1:6 and 1:12 (there are always exceptions though). Again, as a matter of personal preference, I like 1:6 to 1:8. Assuming we use 1:6 as an example, if you want a six inch tree, you should grow the trunk to at least 1 inch diameter. That's a pretty short tree. A one foot tree will need a 2 inch trunk - that will require some growing. If the trunk is less than an inch, you will either end up with a really tiny tree or one that isn't a believable minitiarization.
 

dbonsaiw

Chumono
Messages
518
Reaction score
489
Location
New York
USDA Zone
7b
As a fellow newbie, some reflections on the past year and my changes in perspective are maybe worth sharing. My sons and I went hog-wild collecting trees and started planning our spring cuts. The excitement to get started on developing a bonsai was palpable and this led to needless and sloppy work being done to the trees, not to mention wasted time and money. It took a while for the idea to really set in that bonsai is a long-term project and that cutting this year or next (or the following) ultimately doesn't make all that much of a difference. At this point in my thinking, almost none of my trees will get a trunk chop next year. When I put my impatience aside for even a moment, it became really obvious that I would be totally unsatisfied with my tree if it was cut when 1/2 inch in diameter. After all, I was planning "imperial bonsai" that were 36" tall (this would be awesome if I had a tree with a 6" trunk - which I do not). I am now looking forward to developing much smaller bonsai, and will allow my trunks to grow until I am happy. I will leave at least one tree to grow longer term - maybe I'll get a 6 incher after all. Once you trunk chop the tree, you have nothing to do again, so might as well wait.

In the interim, there are other things to keep us very busy. First, there simply was no way on God's green earth that I would not be cutting a trunk in spring. So, I took the plunge and bought a nursery stock that I can play with. I also lucked out with a big box tree that turned out to have a pretty significant trunk buried under the soil. I did too much work on him, too late in the season and truly hopes he makes it through the winter.

Cutting a trunk is easy - just get a saw and get to it when ready. The hard part is keeping our trees alive and happy for the decade or so that it takes to develop them and then to keep them alive well after they put us in the ground. There is much to learn in this regard. As our trees are growing, there is a wealth of information out there that we can ingest.
 

Munch9

Yamadori
Messages
94
Reaction score
85
Location
Curitiba - Brazil
USDA Zone
10a
As a fellow newbie, some reflections on the past year and my changes in perspective are maybe worth sharing. My sons and I went hog-wild collecting trees and started planning our spring cuts. The excitement to get started on developing a bonsai was palpable and this led to needless and sloppy work being done to the trees, not to mention wasted time and money. It took a while for the idea to really set in that bonsai is a long-term project and that cutting this year or next (or the following) ultimately doesn't make all that much of a difference. At this point in my thinking, almost none of my trees will get a trunk chop next year. When I put my impatience aside for even a moment, it became really obvious that I would be totally unsatisfied with my tree if it was cut when 1/2 inch in diameter. After all, I was planning "imperial bonsai" that were 36" tall (this would be awesome if I had a tree with a 6" trunk - which I do not). I am now looking forward to developing much smaller bonsai, and will allow my trunks to grow until I am happy. I will leave at least one tree to grow longer term - maybe I'll get a 6 incher after all. Once you trunk chop the tree, you have nothing to do again, so might as well wait.

In the interim, there are other things to keep us very busy. First, there simply was no way on God's green earth that I would not be cutting a trunk in spring. So, I took the plunge and bought a nursery stock that I can play with. I also lucked out with a big box tree that turned out to have a pretty significant trunk buried under the soil. I did too much work on him, too late in the season and truly hopes he makes it through the winter.

Cutting a trunk is easy - just get a saw and get to it when ready. The hard part is keeping our trees alive and happy for the decade or so that it takes to develop them and then to keep them alive well after they put us in the ground. There is much to learn in this regard. As our trees are growing, there is a wealth of information out there that we can ingest.
Wise words.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom