New to the site + Question about collecting trees

Messages
7
Likes
6
Location
New England
USDA Zone
6b
#1
Hello! I have been stalking the BonsaiNut forums for quite some time now and it has now come the time to join the community. The resources available on the site are insane, especially since you can get info from all different perspectives, which really sold me.
I'm very excited to continue learning and improve my technique (especially since I'm new to the art form).

Now onto the question...
I believe there is a Morrow's honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii) growing just outside of my vegetable garden for the past two years. The trunk diameter has gotten quite large (maybe three-four inches at the base?) and splits into multiple smaller trunks. I did some research just now that bush-type honeysuckles (Genus Lonicera) make excellent bonsai. However, it is recommended that they are collected/re-potted just when the buds start to emerge. Obviously, this far into the season, the tree has already produced many new shoots of growth.
Would it be safer for the tree to just keep it inground and collect next year instead?

I can post pictures in the morning.

Thanks,
Olea
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
19,624
Likes
25,313
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
#3
If it's in your yard....it won't hurt to wait.

But these are hard to kill...so...
If you get the itch...eh.

Keep its surrounding soil wet so you get or retain some surface roots before dig time...
Feed it.

Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce
 
Messages
7
Likes
6
Location
New England
USDA Zone
6b
#4
If it's in your yard....it won't hurt to wait.

Keep its surrounding soil wet so you get or retain some surface roots before dig time...
Feed it.

Welcome to Crazy!
Thank you both.

I just came back from pruning the bush to take a few pictures of the starting shape. Before pruning it was maybe about 6 feet tall?
DSC_0373.JPG
DSC_0374.JPG DSC_0378.JPG
DSC_0379.JPG
 
Messages
2,053
Likes
1,320
Location
Eugene, OR
USDA Zone
8
#6
Hello! I have been stalking the BonsaiNut forums for quite some time now and it has now come the time to join the community. The resources available on the site are insane, especially since you can get info from all different perspectives, which really sold me.
I'm very excited to continue learning and improve my technique (especially since I'm new to the art form).

Now onto the question...
I believe there is a Morrow's honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii) growing just outside of my vegetable garden for the past two years. The trunk diameter has gotten quite large (maybe three-four inches at the base?) and splits into multiple smaller trunks. I did some research just now that bush-type honeysuckles (Genus Lonicera) make excellent bonsai. However, it is recommended that they are collected/re-potted just when the buds start to emerge. Obviously, this far into the season, the tree has already produced many new shoots of growth.
Would it be safer for the tree to just keep it inground and collect next year instead?

I can post pictures in the morning.

Thanks,
Olea
YES!
 
Messages
18
Likes
4
Location
Connecticut
USDA Zone
6b
#8
Last edited:
Messages
51
Likes
74
Location
Melbourne, Australia
USDA Zone
9b
#10
I’m not so sure you have chopped back to the second node... looks to me like you could keep chopping. Your base is good but those big long straight sections need to be reduced further, they will have no place in your final design without changes in direction (movement) and taper, both of which you’ll be on the road to achieving if you reduce them down, so keep cutting I say!

In relation to tools, I’m a fan of Kaneshin as a brand on the whole but there are plenty of brands and plenty of opinions so don’t get too bogged down, buy the best you can afford with whatever budget you have.
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
19,624
Likes
25,313
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
#11
I'm a Kaneshin Fan myself.
Great tools. Outstanding Service.

But don't forget your standard Fiskars stuff for these jobs. Lifetime replacement warranty.

Regular old saws.

I think you can leave this now....
Let it grow.
With always access...
Theres really no hurry.

Sorce
 
Messages
7
Likes
6
Location
New England
USDA Zone
6b
#12
@Ryceman3 @sorce

It should backbud though, right? And because it is lignified growth, the new shoots will spring out from the cut site? I remember reading or watching that somewhere, please correct me if I am wrong.
If so, are these low enough?
IMG_4881_LI.jpg
And thank you for the tool recommendations!
 
Messages
51
Likes
74
Location
Melbourne, Australia
USDA Zone
9b
#13
@Ryceman3 @sorce

It should backbud though, right? And because it is lignified growth, the new shoots will spring out from the cut site? I remember reading or watching that somewhere, please correct me if I am wrong.
If so, are these low enough?
View attachment 195519
And thank you for the tool recommendations!
In short ... that's more like it!
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
19,624
Likes
25,313
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
#14
I think you stand a good chamce of everything dying except that one green branch down there....

Which would suck.

I'd leave it...

It may grow better buds down there yet...
Just wait!

Sorce
 
Messages
7
Likes
6
Location
New England
USDA Zone
6b
#17
It's really budding now...
IMG_4907.JPG IMG_4908.JPG
But some of the leaves have some damage. There are marks similar to caterpillar bites around the leaves. However, I read that honeysuckle doesn't have any pests or diseases to worry about (according to Bonsai4Me), so if anyone has ideas it would be great if you could share them.
 
Messages
610
Likes
465
Location
Nashville TN
USDA Zone
7a
#18
If this is anything like a regular ol’ bush honesuckle you could probably cut it to the earth and it would snap back..like a terminator

I’ve done this several times with one. Just kept mowing it too for 3 seasons, same deal. Finally it was ended with fire.

Are you keeping all those trunks? If not, why not cut back to the one(s) desired & seal the rest?
 
Messages
7
Likes
6
Location
New England
USDA Zone
6b
#19
Are you keeping all those trunks? If not, why not cut back to the one(s) desired & seal the rest?
I didn't want to risk killing it. I'm in no rush if not cutting it back isn't going to kill it.

Also, because I'm new, I have no idea (okay, maybe a small idea) where a stylistic cut would be appropriate. Root pruning is no problem for me, but pruning branches is kind of daunting.
I'm not at a point where I can easily visualize the finished tree before me, obviously meaning that I'm lacking in experience. I've read countless articles and watched hundreds of videos, and all I need now is some guided experience with working on trees.