newbie w/ a kojo no mai

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Hi all! I've been growing various houseplants and a fair number of carnivorous plants for a while and wanted to "branch" (sorry) out. I picked up a little prunus incisa kojo-no-mai after some research and had a getting-started question for anyone with more knowledge than me...figured this board would be a good place to start :)
I'm primarily concerned about getting this guy the right amount of water....this is an area of personal struggle for me haha. I know the soil should always be moist but well drained, so I'm wondering if I can use a setup like I do with some of my drosera that also have fairly sandy soil and need to stay moist, by keeping its pot (it's shohin style if that matters) in a small tray of water and letting it dry out, then refilling. I saw on another thread that you can water from the bottom but should let the pot sit for ~45 seconds then throw out the excess water. Does one of these approaches sound less risky than the other? Appreciate all thoughts on the matter!

Thanks~
Fiona
 

Cadillactaste

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These should not be classified indoors by any means. (Not that you have) ...they don't like full sun their roots get hot during summer. Might you fill in your location so we are more apt to offer direction. These need a dormancy period...I am assuming you also know this.

I would rethink having it sitting in a tray of water...roots can rot that way.

Welcome to crazy!
 
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These should not be classified indoors by any means. (Not that you have) ...they don't like full sun their roots get hot during summer. Might you fill in your location so we are more apt to offer direction. These need a dormancy period...I am assuming you also know this.

I would rethink having it sitting in a tray of water...roots can rot that way.

Welcome to crazy!
Thanks @Cadillactaste! So this _is_ an indoor specimen, drawback of apartment living, but I've got a full-sun window with plenty of options available for filtering the light (I'm in San Francisco so it doesn't get too hot during the summer but I do know p. incisa needs cool roots, and some shade during the warmest months). Good to know re: water — I'll follow the second approach instead. I read somewhere that it has a dormancy period but haven't actually found further instruction on that (except to water it less during that time), any further info you have on that would be super appreciated!

And thanks — looking forward to it :)
 

KiwiPlantGuy

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Wonderful thank you!
Hi nomaibonsai,
Welcome to the forum. I realise that apartment living can be a bit tricky to keep bonsai trees alive ( apart from Ficus :)).
Not trying to tell you what to do but if have an outdoor patio/balcony your “Prunus” would appreciate that environment better. Shady place for Summer and outside year round in your zone to achieve dormancy.
If you can’t create dormancy by outside Winter conditions your nice tree may sadly slowly wither and die in a few years.

Just my 2 cents.
Charles
 
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Hi nomaibonsai,
Welcome to the forum. I realise that apartment living can be a bit tricky to keep bonsai trees alive ( apart from Ficus :)).
Not trying to tell you what to do but if have an outdoor patio/balcony your “Prunus” would appreciate that environment better. Shady place for Summer and outside year round in your zone to achieve dormancy.
If you can’t create dormancy by outside Winter conditions your nice tree may sadly slowly wither and die in a few years.

Just my 2 cents.
Charles
Hi @KiwiPlantGuy, thanks, happy to be here! Sadly an outdoor patio or balcony isn't possible at this point, but I'm gonna try to be up for the challenge of fooling this guy into thinking it's in a place with appropriate seasons :) and who knows, maybe by a few years from now I'll have an actual yard haha. Appreciate your feedback!
 

Cadillactaste

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@sorce ...any apartment dwelling tips to get this tree outside buddy? Like rig something from the window?

If you are serious of broadening your horticultural aspect...there are indoor tropical trees which won't weaken and die in a few years. Bougainvillea are lovely...very hardy tree.
 
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Potawatomi13

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I picked up a little prunus incisa kojo-no-mai after some research
Not right kind of research apparently. Vast majority of Bonsai suitable trees will die indoors. Get with local Bonsai Club and give tree to someone that can keep properly;). Get indoors suitable tree and be happy.
 
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