CoreSeverin

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Good Evening!
I just wanted to share this new Oak! I got this from a family members property that has three different oak species, as well as other trees. This oak was carefully dug out of the ground and placed into a fairly large training box. I really like the way the trunk bends on it. the first branch sits very low on the trunk and there are three leading branches coming nearly straight up off of the trunk, and I expect that after a couple years at least one of those will come off. I collected this tree last week, and I think it is doing fairly well so far. The only problem I can see so far is that the youngest, and most tender leaves are wilting somewhat, but hopefully that will pass with time. I am keeping it in a shady spot, with dappled sun during the hottest hours.
-Core
 

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Gabler

Chumono
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Keep your tree shaded and water frequently. It looks like the sun is setting in the background? If so, the tree is probably in a good spot on the north side of a building, where there's good shade in the hottest part of the day.
 

CoreSeverin

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good tips, im going to keep that in mind because i really like this tree and want it to do well. also that was the sunset this evening. i keep most of my trees on that north side, because i had problems with scorch last summer.
 

Potawatomi13

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Rather late for collecting this but fingers crossed for it. Leaves look much like Post Oak Q. stellata. Great base! Too good to keep any straight growth/in trunk/branches of future tree. Once tree is strong can cut back pretty hard and expect new branches to emerge many places. Likely next year if survival succeeds.
 

Gabler

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@Potawatomi13, I was also thinking post oak, but wasn't certain enough about it to risk offering a false suggestion. Since you mention it, that looks about right. @CoreSeverin, another tip if you're attached to the tree: set up a little greenhouse. You can buy little tents on Amazon for $50-$100. Another member recommended it to me earlier this year, and it's been extremely effective at locking in humidity. Just be careful not to cook your trees. Shade becomes more important when you take the greenhouse effect into consideration.
 

CoreSeverin

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Rather late for collecting this but fingers crossed for it. Leaves look much like Post Oak Q. stellata. Great base! Too good to keep any straight growth/in trunk/branches of future tree. Once tree is strong can cut back pretty hard and expect new branches to emerge many places. Likely next year if survival succeeds.
yeah i was worried that it might be too late. ive just been watching it each day for wilting. ive noticed some wilting on the really young leaves, hopefully its not a sign of bigger issues.
 

CoreSeverin

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@Potawatomi13, I was also thinking post oak, but wasn't certain enough about it to risk offering a false suggestion. Since you mention it, that looks about right. @CoreSeverin, another tip if you're attached to the tree: set up a little greenhouse. You can buy little tents on Amazon for $50-$100. Another member recommended it to me earlier this year, and it's been extremely effective at locking in humidity. Just be careful not to cook your trees. Shade becomes more important when you take the greenhouse effect into consideration.
thats a good idea, i wonder if i could build something like that with pvc hoops. like a bivvy sack for trees?
 

CoreSeverin

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@Potawatomi13, I was also thinking post oak, but wasn't certain enough about it to risk offering a false suggestion. Since you mention it, that looks about right. @CoreSeverin, another tip if you're attached to the tree: set up a little greenhouse. You can buy little tents on Amazon for $50-$100. Another member recommended it to me earlier this year, and it's been extremely effective at locking in humidity. Just be careful not to cook your trees. Shade becomes more important when you take the greenhouse effect into consideration.
also with the weather today we are at 96% humidity and tons of cloud cover today, so that might have a similar effect to a greenhouse, so that will help if it lasts longer than a day or two. kansas gets humid in general, which is handy.
 

Tieball

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I have no facts or much experience with Oaks. I only have two oaks in development. However, I have read that collecting oaks in the early summer, at full leaf, works much better than the bud-swell timing of other deciduous trees. So, while you may see some expected wilting, there may be a good recovery as the tree continues its growth pattern.

I dug up and moved the two oaks I have to growing boxes while they were in full leaf. It didn’t seem to scare the trees at all. I watered well and kept the trees in a filtered sun area for a couple weeks….under the shade of a full fire tree. Then it was full sun after that. And, no special winter treatment….full outdoor freezing and whatever winter brought. It seemed to work well for me in my climate.

That box you have the oak in looks heavy.
 

CoreSeverin

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I have no facts or much experience with Oaks. I only have two oaks in development. However, I have read that collecting oaks in the early summer, at full leaf, works much better than the bud-swell timing of other deciduous trees. So, while you may see some expected wilting, there may be a good recovery as the tree continues its growth pattern.

I dug up and moved the two oaks I have to growing boxes while they were in full leaf. It didn’t seem to scare the trees at all. I watered well and kept the trees in a filtered sun area for a couple weeks….under the shade of a full fire tree. Then it was full sun after that. And, no special winter treatment….full outdoor freezing and whatever winter brought. It seemed to work well for me in my climate.

That box you have the oak in looks heavy
thanks for the info there, thats very promising stuff that made me happy to read because i have such minimal experience in collecting trees and bonsai in general. I have it in a really shady right under a fairly large tree. and yes that box is heavy, all my boxes are like that because i made them with 2x4s that i got for free. good stuff, but quite heavy.
 

Tieball

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thanks for the info there, thats very promising stuff that made me happy to read because i have such minimal experience in collecting trees and bonsai in general. I have it in a really shady right under a fairly large tree. and yes that box is heavy, all my boxes are like that because i made them with 2x4s that i got for free. good stuff, but quite heavy.
This is a link to an article on oak collecting. I found it an interesting read. It may be good information for you….or not. Good reading though….from a reputable person.
 

JackHammer

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I like that tree a lot. Nice find.
The deal with oaks is that they live in the shadow of their parent for a long, long time(very shady). There is a lot of competition and they grow very slowly because of it. But! They can absolutely grow in full sun, they just have to be used to it. Even the giant trees in my yard can get sunburned on an un-seasonably bright day. They seem to like water too. There are a few trees near lower wet areas and they really thrive.
... now please excuse me, I need to go dig up some oak saplings... !
 

Tieball

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@JackHammer ….you are correct. I observed oaks around me. Lots of them. Small with huge filtered-sun-gathering leaves. I just didn’t think in terms of a shadowed start under the parent tree. But that’s true. Thanks for mentioning that fact and adding some growing clarification. I also find that oaks do thrive well, and do better, with good frequent watering. I’m letting an oak in a plastic squat pot grow out to thicken the trunk. The trunks starting to bark-up and is about 2” (50mm). This was the first year I found acorn developments. Now I know the acorns probably suck up energy….however, I want to see the acorns develop and mature. They are usually high up in a tree so I’ve never seen them grow up close. Just something interesting to observe. New to me…not new to others likely.
3D7F1B3F-39DD-41C7-BC42-28E595F43BC4.jpeg
 

CoreSeverin

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This is a link to an article on oak collecting. I found it an interesting read. It may be good information for you….or not. Good reading though….from a reputable person.
I read that article and that was really helpful it's kind of counterintuitive that you can collect oaks so late in the season and have them do better than if you did it before their buds are popping off
 

CoreSeverin

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I like that tree a lot. Nice find.
The deal with oaks is that they live in the shadow of their parent for a long, long time(very shady). There is a lot of competition and they grow very slowly because of it. But! They can absolutely grow in full sun, they just have to be used to it. Even the giant trees in my yard can get sunburned on an un-seasonably bright day. They seem to like water too. There are a few trees near lower wet areas and they really thrive.
... now please excuse me, I need to go dig up some oak saplings... !
yeah they really do live in very shady environments. this one was in an oak forest a couple hours east of Wichita. the apot that i found it had all the trees cut down to put up telephone poles, though 20 feet away are huge oaks and Eastern Red Cedars.
 

CoreSeverin

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@JackHammer ….you are correct. I observed oaks around me. Lots of them. Small with huge filtered-sun-gathering leaves. I just didn’t think in terms of a shadowed start under the parent tree. But that’s true. Thanks for mentioning that fact and adding some growing clarification. I also find that oaks do thrive well, and do better, with good frequent watering. I’m letting an oak in a plastic squat pot grow out to thicken the trunk. The trunks starting to bark-up and is about 2” (50mm). This was the first year I found acorn developments. Now I know the acorns probably suck up energy….however, I want to see the acorns develop and mature. They are usually high up in a tree so I’ve never seen them grow up close. Just something interesting to observe. New to me…not new to others likely.
View attachment 379778
nice little acorns! that tree must be really vigorous if its putting out acorns.
 

JackHammer

Mame
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@JackHammer ….you are correct. I observed oaks around me. Lots of them. Small with huge filtered-sun-gathering leaves. I just didn’t think in terms of a shadowed start under the parent tree. But that’s true. Thanks for mentioning that fact and adding some growing clarification. I also find that oaks do thrive well, and do better, with good frequent watering. I’m letting an oak in a plastic squat pot grow out to thicken the trunk. The trunks starting to bark-up and is about 2” (50mm). This was the first year I found acorn developments. Now I know the acorns probably suck up energy….however, I want to see the acorns develop and mature. They are usually high up in a tree so I’ve never seen them grow up close. Just something interesting to observe. New to me…not new to others likely.
View attachment 379778
I have a few acres and some massive oak trees. I am amazed at how resilliant they are. Last fall I cleared some forested land with red and white oak and every one of the trees came back. I even mowed them over with the riding mower. I don't know how they would do in a pot but in the wild, I have trouble killing them.
There is a book the secret life of trees, the author talks about 400 year old oak trees, I believe it.
 

CoreSeverin

Yamadori
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I have a few acres and some massive oak trees. I am amazed at how resilliant they are. Last fall I cleared some forested land with red and white oak and every one of the trees came back. I even mowed them over with the riding mower. I don't know how they would do in a pot but in the wild, I have trouble killing them.
There is a book the secret life of trees, the author talks about 400 year old oak trees, I believe it.
wow that must be so awesome to have a property like that! what a dream that would be! yeah they are pretty tough trees, although my wifes grandfather says that when it comes to black oaks that "you can beat em with a big chain and they grow even better, but if you pluck a leaf the next week, itll probably die!" i am not sure how true that is, but im not about to argue with him about it. there are some old oaks out there that are practically famous!
 

CoreSeverin

Yamadori
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by the way, here is some wilting that i mentioned earlier. its just the young foliage so far, im going to keep an eye out on the rest and keep it out of the sun until it settles in 20210608_172910.jpg
 

Wulfskaar

Shohin
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I have a few acres and some massive oak trees. I am amazed at how resilliant they are. Last fall I cleared some forested land with red and white oak and every one of the trees came back. I even mowed them over with the riding mower. I don't know how they would do in a pot but in the wild, I have trouble killing them.
There is a book the secret life of trees, the author talks about 400 year old oak trees, I believe it.
I've got a 400 year old (estimated) in my yard and a couple others that are nearly as old (see my avatar picture). They are Coast Live Oaks. I love them!
 

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