Nihonga scrolls

rockm

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I came across this link to a Japanese antique store in the Pacific NW. It is VERY high end, but some of the stuff on their website is astounding. The scrolls and byobu (screens), in particular, are startling (as I bet the prices are--as none have price tags--if you have to ask "how much is that" you can't afford it...'-) )

Anyway here's a link to the scrolls

http://www.kagedo.com/collections/5/5c/index.shtml#archive

Also check out the Taisho metalwork (okimono).
 

Smoke

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Thanks Mark,

Here is another in Oregon. Who knew the Pacific Northwest was such a mecca of Japanese high culture.

http://www.ukiyoe-gallery.com/scrolls.htm

Prices here in the 500.00 to 800.00 range.

Makes me happy I have the collection that I have.

Cheers, Al
 

rockm

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Al,

Thanks for the link. I'm kind of familiar with that site through collecting shin hanga prints.

I didn't know they sold scrolls though.

I'd bet the prices at the Kagedo place probably start well above $1,000, possibly more. Some of the scroll artists they have listed are noted Shin Hanga or Ukiyoe artists...

I'll never be able to buy anything like, but the art is inspiring.
 
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subnet_rx

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Thanks for these links. I've been looking at decorating an extra room as tokonoma and these will definitely help.
 

rockm

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Sub,

If you're looking to buy and don't want to spend more than a grand on a scroll, you might search Ebay for "Japanese scroll" and sort highest to lowest. I've found some extremely nice scrolls there for less than $100 offered by Japanese sellers. Importation cost adds about $20 or less per purchase. I've bought a dozen or more and rotate most of them on the walls of my house seasonally. I really like having them around.

I'd bet some of the scrolls on this site are well over $5,000, as they're by noted mid-19 to early-20th century artists--the four scroll moon series on the site, for instance is by Watanabe Seitei--who is a notable Shin Hanga print artist. The scroll art would be higher priced than his prints as it is entirely original work in his brushstrokes. Prints are reproductions of brushwork, yet prime examples of his Seitei's prints can cost over $1,000...

There are several other notable woodblock print artists' work listed on the website also.
 
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Smoke

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Mark would you be up to posting a few pictures of some of your favorite scrolls that you own. I will show you mine if you show me yours!
 

subnet_rx

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Sub,

If you're looking to buy and don't want to spend more than a grand on a scroll, you might search Ebay for "Japanese scroll" and sort highest to lowest. I've found some extremely nice scrolls there for less than $100 offered by Japanese sellers. Importation cost adds about $20 or less per purchase. I've bought a dozen or more and rotate most of them on the walls of my house seasonally. I really like having them around.

I'd bet some of the scrolls on this site are well over $5,000, as they're by noted mid-19 to early-20th century artists--the four scroll moon series on the site, for instance is by Watanabe Seitei--who is a notable Shin Hanga print artist. The scroll art would be higher priced than his prints as it is entirely original work in his brushstrokes. Prints are reproductions of brushwork, yet prime examples of his Seitei's prints can cost over $1,000...

There are several other notable woodblock print artists' work listed on the website also.

Thanks, yeah, I have a few japanese pieces from eBay that I've purchased over the past two years and have been actively searching for others. The problem I have is seeing quality. The one scroll that I have that is the one that I think is worthy of the room is the one that cost the least. I'm looking for other seasonal scrolls, but am also looking for a tea set and some smaller furniture. I'm going to try to make the rest. That's my other problem, finding bamboo wood.
 

RyanFrye

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That link is great.

Al and Rock let's see some of your collection!:D
 

rockm

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Al, Ryan,

It's embarrassing, but I don't have pics of my scrolls, or trees fit to post :eek::eek:

I don't have a digital camera that can take decent photos. I haven't set aside the money to buy one in all these years. Kind of a lame excuse, but there you have it. Unfortunately, that money ain't going to be around anytime soon...:(

In any case, I tend to get simple scrolls with smaller animals--insects, crows, frogs, etc., as well as some with austere landscapes--moon above ponds, hills and the like. I've never spent over $150 for any given item.

In the last few years, bonsai has lead me to a fuller appreciation of Japanese art. I started collecting Shin hanga prints, scrolls, smaller Okimono and other odds and ends like Kashigata (carved cherry wood rice cake molds--sounds ridiculous, I know, but some of the designs are terrific).
 
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rockm

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My cell is five years old. Camera is worse on it than the cheapo digi I have...
 

Smoke

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This is the Keppler collection of scrolls. It is a mixture of tea ceremony pieces as well as Sansui and Taki Kakejiku. I try to find simple and unassuming scrolls that will complement suiseki and bonsai together. It is very hard to find that one scroll that captures the essence of what it is you are trying to say.

These are scrolls of Mount Fuji. The first is a new years scroll with cranes. Both sacred in the hearts of Japanese.

The second is Mt. Fuji and a poem. I do not know what the poem says and have tried hard to get it read but due to the nature of the script it is virtually impossible to have these read unless you were a member of the family and could read the writing.

The third is Mt. Fuji in winter. Perfect for January and a New years display.
 

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Smoke

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The first is a Tea Ceremony scroll of Kanji. It says "Pine needles in the wind".

The last two are Taki, Japanese for waterfall.
 

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Smoke

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I might also mention that many of the scrolls are quite old. For example the Mt. Fuji in the middle above that has the poem is from circa 1910. There are some coming up from 1850 and slightly after. Finding scrolls of this nature in this condition is part of the hunt.

The first is a tea ceremony scroll of fall. It contains dry grass with a cicada.

The second is a tea ceremony of spring with a row of Sakura in bloom. Sakura are Cherry tree.

The third is a Tea ceremony scroll of a Japanese peasant. Simple and worthy of reflection.
 

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Smoke

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The first scroll is Fall and flying cranes.

Second is spring and two Koi.

Third and fourth are two Sansui (landscape) scroll of Japan. Mostly everyday life with fishermen doing daily chores. kind of a "day in the life" scene. These two are from 1925 and were in the family so I know when they were brought here.
 

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Smoke

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These tea ceremony scroll all capture the moon. Some are for winter, some are for fall and the one is for early spring with ume branch and blossom.

The darker scroll, I think fourth with the dry grass over the moon is from circa 1850 by Shunjo. Probably the rarest scroll I have. The first scroll is from circa 1910-15.
 

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Smoke

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And last but certainly not least, this matched pair of Tea ceremony scrolls from 1939. They are in the original double scroll box and one depicts fall with moon and cicada while the other depicts spring and once again sakura blossoms with rising sun.
 

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rockm

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Thanks for posting anyway, Al. I am working on borrowing a decent camera, so maybe I can put my scrolls where my mouth is soon.

All of these are excellent. I especially like the group of evening/moon pictures. Those are among my favorites. I have two full sized scroll with moon images, but picked up two "bonsai sized" scrolls (which are about 15 inches and 24 inches tall or so) of similar images a couple of years ago.

I avoid Kanji, unless the accompanying image is the focus. That's personal preference, as Kanji script can be quite beautiful.
 

Klytus

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What is the symbology of leaping fish in these scrolls?

Could one substitute a stuffed Pike in a case or perhaps a Marlin?
 
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rockm

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Klytus,

You can go ahead and stuff your pike if you want to :D:eek:.

The jumping carp is a symbol of transformation and endurance in Japanese lore. Carp leaping up waterfalls is about overcoming obstacles to achieve a goal--overcoming daunting odds. Carp are seen as the most energetic of fishes.

More specifically, in May "boy's day" in Japan uses this symbol in association with boys making the journey to become men...Families fly carp streamers for each boy in the family...

http://www.ginkoya.com/pages/childrensday.html

And yes, there is a Girl's Day in Japan too..
 
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