Niwaki Pro tools - Are they any good?

ceriano

Shohin
Messages
342
Reaction score
119
Location
Richmond, Virginia
USDA Zone
7a
Does anybody know who manufactures Niwaki pro tools? Are they decent?
One of our local outdoor gear stores has them on sale 30-40% off.

 

Deep Sea Diver

Masterpiece
Messages
2,375
Reaction score
4,553
Location
Bothell, WA
USDA Zone
8b
I’m sure these are awesome.

However they also appear to be about 20-25% overpriced compared to many other quality similar items in the market.

Over the years I’ve used many hedge trimmers and secateurs. Here’s what I’ve learned.

a. Dont buy until you’ve at least held them and felt the balance of the tool, with and without your favorite garden gloves on.

Most hedge trimmers in particular are a bit unbalanced for my tastes. This results in fatigue and miscues when pruning.
Many secateurs dont fit my hand properly.

b. Sooner or later you will have to sharpen/oil the blades of both, and disinfect/clean sooner, no matter the quality. Be sure to do this properly. A well done job can make an inexpensive tool work brilliantly and a quality tool a blunt instrument. There are plenty of decent videos on YouTube showing how this is done sharpening Felcos. I use Felcos as they are easy to take apart, clean and sharpen. Especially with the 903 stone.


Cheers
DSD sends
 

ceriano

Shohin
Messages
342
Reaction score
119
Location
Richmond, Virginia
USDA Zone
7a
I’m sure these are awesome.

However they also appear to be about 20-25% overpriced compared to many other quality similar items in the market.

Over the years I’ve used many hedge trimmers and secateurs. Here’s what I’ve learned.

a. Dont buy until you’ve at least held them and felt the balance of the tool, with and without your favorite garden gloves on.

Most hedge trimmers in particular are a bit unbalanced for my tastes. This results in fatigue and miscues when pruning.
Many secateurs dont fit my hand properly.

b. Sooner or later you will have to sharpen/oil the blades of both, and disinfect/clean sooner, no matter the quality. Be sure to do this properly. A well done job can make an inexpensive tool work brilliantly and a quality tool a blunt instrument. There are plenty of decent videos on YouTube showing how this is done sharpening Felcos. I use Felcos as they are easy to take apart, clean and sharpen. Especially with the 903 stone.


Cheers
DSD sends
I can get them for the same price as Felco, about $50 or so.
Does Felco still offer restoration?
 

Deep Sea Diver

Masterpiece
Messages
2,375
Reaction score
4,553
Location
Bothell, WA
USDA Zone
8b
Good to hear, it’s your money your call.

I worked with at least half a dozen secateurs over the years before I landed on Felco’s. No reason why you shouldn’t try a bunch either.😎. Like I said, they have to fit you.

Best
DSD sends
 

ceriano

Shohin
Messages
342
Reaction score
119
Location
Richmond, Virginia
USDA Zone
7a
Looks like the pro range is made by Kudo family. I haven't heard of them before but may worth a shot!
 

ceriano

Shohin
Messages
342
Reaction score
119
Location
Richmond, Virginia
USDA Zone
7a
Good to hear, it’s your money your call.

I worked with at least half a dozen secateurs over the years before I landed on Felco’s. No reason why you shouldn’t try a bunch either.😎. Like I said, they have to fit you.

Best
DSD sends
I feel Felco will probably out live any Japanese carbon steel pruner.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

Masterpiece
Messages
4,739
Reaction score
7,589
Location
Netherlands
Most hedge trimmers in particular are a bit unbalanced for my tastes. This results in fatigue and miscues when pruning
My dad asks me every year to prune two apple trees.
They're each about 7 foot tall and wide, and we have to take breaks to give our upper arms some rest. But these kind of exercises separate the good from the bad fast.
Part of the reason why I skip most Japanese tools all together. Ergonomics are a big factor, especially when having to make the right cut in an awkward position.
Craftsmanship or not, if it handles like a snake on fire after five minutes, I'd rather go for whatever the local hardware store is selling.
I'm a big fan of Gardena brand tools. But I don't know if they're sold in the US.
 

ceriano

Shohin
Messages
342
Reaction score
119
Location
Richmond, Virginia
USDA Zone
7a
My dad asks me every year to prune two apple trees.
They're each about 7 foot tall and wide, and we have to take breaks to give our upper arms some rest. But these kind of exercises separate the good from the bad fast.
Part of the reason why I skip most Japanese tools all together. Ergonomics are a big factor, especially when having to make the right cut in an awkward position.
Craftsmanship or not, if it handles like a snake on fire after five minutes, I'd rather go for whatever the local hardware store is selling.
I'm a big fan of Gardena brand tools. But I don't know if they're sold in the US.
Thanks this helps a lot. I guess Felco 2 it is then.
 

ceriano

Shohin
Messages
342
Reaction score
119
Location
Richmond, Virginia
USDA Zone
7a
Thanks this helps a lot. I guess Felco 2 it is then.
Life is short I got a pair of Niwaki too! I must say the fit and finish is very nice. Probably not as functional as felco tho
 

Attachments

  • 5993785C-8A04-44F2-BE0E-FA2F5F39F92A.jpeg
    5993785C-8A04-44F2-BE0E-FA2F5F39F92A.jpeg
    336.2 KB · Views: 19

penumbra

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,857
Reaction score
11,033
Location
Front Royal, VA
USDA Zone
6
I have several pairs of Felco #2. They were standard issue at every nursery I have worked for. My older ones are 50 years old and I still use them.
 

Deep Sea Diver

Masterpiece
Messages
2,375
Reaction score
4,553
Location
Bothell, WA
USDA Zone
8b
Yep.

You can even get replacement blades and parts kits etc for Felcos! I love mine.

My wife got a pair of Japanese knockoff Felcos called “Seymour Smith”. They are a pain to service,screws made out of not so good metal, easily strippable, spring rusts easily and plastic lock nut. Blade doesn’t stay locked shut. Ugh!
image.jpg

cheers
DSD sends
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom