North Georgia winter protection

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Location
Newnan, GA
USDA Zone
7b
#1
This is the first winter I that I've got a few trees in display pots instead of larger training pots, and I want to make sure I prepare for the cold weather. I'm in zone 7a around Atlanta, which has relatively mild winters.

From what I've read on Evergreen Garden Works and Bonsai4Me, I shouldn't have to take much extra precaution about protecting my trees until temperatures get about 20°F.

http://www.evergreengardenworks.com/overwint.htm
http://www.evergreengardenworks.com/frzekill.htm
http://www.bonsai4me.com/Basics/Basics_WinterCare.html

My plant is to simply move my trees off my bench to the ground, and pile some pine or cedar mulch around the pots. Is this going to be sufficient protection for them? I also have a trident maple in a training pot that I didn't take any special care about last year, but after learning that they're susceptible to cold-weather root damage, I want to make sure I protect it as well.
 

GrimLore

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#4
Ah, I didn't think of this. Is that to keep them from coming out of dormancy on warmer days?
Dormancy is caused by length of day more then temperature. Keeping them on the North side will have them in the lowest light conditions throughout the day. ;)

Grimmy
 
Messages
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Location
Newnan, GA
USDA Zone
7b
#6
Dormancy is caused by length of day more then temperature. Keeping them on the North side will have them in the lowest light conditions throughout the day. ;)
It's usually sunny on warmer days, so I wasn't completely off base! :p

One more question... what sort of watering schedule should I plan on? I've had a daily watering timer on my bonsai bench since spring, but I know that they'll need much less than that in the cold months.
 

Dav4

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#7
This is the first winter I that I've got a few trees in display pots instead of larger training pots, and I want to make sure I prepare for the cold weather. I'm in zone 7a around Atlanta, which has relatively mild winters.

From what I've read on Evergreen Garden Works and Bonsai4Me, I shouldn't have to take much extra precaution about protecting my trees until temperatures get about 20°F.

http://www.evergreengardenworks.com/overwint.htm
http://www.evergreengardenworks.com/frzekill.htm
http://www.bonsai4me.com/Basics/Basics_WinterCare.html

My plant is to simply move my trees off my bench to the ground, and pile some pine or cedar mulch around the pots. Is this going to be sufficient protection for them? I also have a trident maple in a training pot that I didn't take any special care about last year, but after learning that they're susceptible to cold-weather root damage, I want to make sure I protect it as well.
I think your plan will work just fine. I moved to Cobb county 7 years ago from MA and I can tell you the winters are not bad at all here compared to up there. I will actually leave my trees on the benches for the majority of the winter, mainly because I have dogs and varmints in the yard that would cause them damage if they were placed on the ground. They do get placed on the ground if temps are falling into the low 20's...and I'll cover the pots with leaves if temps are supposed to fall into the mid teens or lower. All my trees, including tridents, sail through the winter without issue.
 

Dav4

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#8
It's usually sunny on warmer days, so I wasn't completely off base! :p

One more question... what sort of watering schedule should I plan on? I've had a daily watering timer on my bonsai bench since spring, but I know that they'll need much less than that in the cold months.
Water as needed. As the winter solstice approaches, my back yard barely get any direct sun, so the pot soil stay moist. Last year, I put the hose away for the winter right around now...because of the drought and super dry air, I'm still watering every 2nd or 3rd day.
 

Adair M

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#9
Water as needed. As the winter solstice approaches, my back yard barely get any direct sun, so the pot soil stay moist. Last year, I put the hose away for the winter right around now...because of the drought and super dry air, I'm still watering every 2nd or 3rd day.
I still water every day. But I have full sun. And I use full inorganic soil.

When it gets really cold, below freezing, I don't water. But winter usually has dryer air. And trees can dry out. So I would make sure the trees don't dry out.

I also try to protect them from wind, which dries them out.
 

GrimLore

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#10
I also try to protect them from wind, which dries them out.
Even just growing as I do this year - Wind and drying is very important. It is not unusual for me in this location to water throughout the Winter.

One more question... what sort of watering schedule should I plan on? I've had a daily watering timer on my bonsai bench since spring, but I know that they'll need much less than that in the cold months
No schedule to be honest. Just water as they need. For example never let a juniper dry out completely as well as pines. Trees like Maples if healthy and frozen need no water. The point I am trying to make is this - Depending where you live and what each plant needs during any Winter is up to you and the plant/tree/bonsai outdoors ;)

Grimmy
 
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