Not yamadori larch

AlainK

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Grown from a 2 yr-old seedling in 1994.



No deadwood yet.
 

Bob

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Nice larch Alain. Did it spend any time in the ground or was it pot grown the entire time?

Bob
 

AlainK

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It was pot-grown the entire time.

This is another one from the same stock that I planted in the ground, I moved it three times and finally put it in a growing container last year:

February 2008, the top had dried out (it was over 4 metres high, sthg like 14 ft I think):



March 2008:



July 2008:



March 2009:



I'm not really satisfied with what I've done, and one important branch at the top died, but I like the base, I think it has a potential. Since larch backbuds easily on old wood, several options are open. this year, I let it grow...
 

RyanFrye

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I like the first one. It is very subtle in its movement and the base flair is great. The second one we'll just have to wait and see what you do with it;)
 

Rick Moquin

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Considering how you are approaching this pass time Alain, well done. I like your work. Both larches are nice and I do see great potential with the second as time goes by. Make sure you post it next year.
 
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Alan,

Very nice taper on the pot grown Larch, great movement and excellent branch placement. Was the taper and movement achieved with a series of hack backs or just a couple?



Will
 

AlainK

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Actually, when i started it, I didn't want to cut too many roots. These were my first larches, I had no experience of their cultivation and I wanted first to keep them alive.

Some of the roots on this one were a bit high on the trunk, so I tied them around the base with raffiachanging it every year before repotting so that the roots would stay in place.

The movement was achieved by wiring, but at one point, I decided to cut the top part and restyle it.

Here is the oldest photo of it I have, April 2004:



November 2004, before and after removing the top part:





January 2009:



February 2009, after wiring:

 
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Nice progression with a good result. Some people frown at exposed rootage, such as this, I like it and think you have successfully used it on this piece.


Will
 

october

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Very...very nice tree.........Very natural..........The larch species just strikes me as a tree that should be shaped to mimic nature...Other trees can be carved and shaped differnet ways, but I just think that a larch has a graceful, natural appearance in nature, so it should also represent that in a bonsai... Once again, very nice tree...

Rob
 
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I really like the ruggedness of the second field grown one. To me this really shows of this species, reminds me of N. Idaho. The trunk size to branch dia. ratio really gives the impression of a very old tree, even though there is not much taper.

I might bring the jin way down and remove that big set of roots going of to the left. I see it seems you tied up a new leader?
 
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Ang3lfir3

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The trunk size to branch dia. ratio really gives the impression of a very old tree, even though there is not much taper.

The lack of taper is also what helps the appearance of being an Ancient tree.... Ancient conifers have little to no taper...
 

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