Now that I've read a bunch of literature,,,,,

David M. Martin

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Thanks to everyone who recommended reading for me. It really helped but now I want some advice on my Juniper's roots. I have finally reacclimated it to the outdoors, (thanks for that advice too), and it's growing and I've had to trim it a bit already, starting the fertilizer for the growing season, and am checking the soil moisture every day. The problem is there are a lot of "hair" roots showing above the soil line. About 2 inches worth to be exact. I'm not confident enough to just dig in and trim them or to add more soil, or to cover them with moss, or just to leave well enough alone since it's not complaining. I love the shape it's forming after my inital trim and don't want to do anything to "upset the apple cart"! I've attached three photos for you to look at and give me your opinion on. Take a look at the attachments. Please??????
 
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IdahoDR

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If the tree is in fact healthy and acclimated, you should repot.

Remove the tree from the pot, Gently rake out the root ball, and then trim the roots as neccisary. When repotting make sure to work the soil gently back into the rootball, and dont leave air pockets. Repot in a good well draining soil.

There are Youtube videos that can explain repoting beter than i can explain it into words
 

sfhellwig

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If you aren't familiar with re-potting you may want to read it in a book first. I would always agree that video is better than book because there is a lot you can't see happen in a still shot. However Youtube is full of as much crap as it is good video. And if you can't tell the difference there is some bad stuff on there. I guess go ahead and watch. But take it with a grain of salt. I know for certain there is one that shows someone taking a juniper out of the nursery can, lopping off the bottom half of the dirt/roots and then cramming it into a bonsai pot forcefully with their thumbs:eek:.
 

jk_lewis

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Yes. It needs repotting and needs to be planted deeper in the pot. The current soil looks awful. I'd suggest something on the order of 2/3 turface or gravel and 1/3 composted pine bark. Since you are in Indiana it's probably still an OK time to repot.

You could find a local club -- Indiana clubs listed below -- and get some experienced people to help. That's even better than a video or a book!

Indiana
INDIANA - Elkhart

Wellfield Bonsai Study. Meets the 2nd Sunday of each at 2 p.m. Meeting are held at the Wellfield Botanic Gardens, 1000 N. Main St. in Elkhart, IN - There is no December or January. For more information contact: Liz Borger by e-mail to Elkbonsai532@Gmail.com
INDIANA - Ft. Wayne

Ft. Wayne Bonsai Club. Meets the 4th Saturday each month at 10:30 a.m. Meetings are at various libraries, homes or the Foellinger-Freimann Botanical Conservatory. Club meetings are designed for educating and sharing knowledge, skills and experiences. For meeting locations please contact Kathy Lee (260) 637-6242 or by e-mailto igarden2@aol.com. Website: http://fortwaynebonsai.org.
INDIANA - Indianapolis

Indianapolis Bonsai Club. Meets on first Wednesday of each month at 7:00pm. Meetings are held at the Garfield Park Conservatory, 2450 Shelby St., Indianapolis, IN. President Mark Fields: maf71459@yahoo.com, Vice-President Carl Wooldridge: carlwool@hotmail.com. Website http://www.indybonsai.org/
 

sfhellwig

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I guess I didn't really address your pictures, OP. Luckily JKL came along like he is known for and gave you sound advice. If the tree is in too bad of soil, re-potting even a little late will be of more benefit to the tree for the entire growing season to come. While re-potting you would have to address the exposed roots. If their tips go into the soil and have appreciatable feeder roots then perhaps you want to cover them with soil to keep that structure. If they are not contributing to the health of the tree then they should be removed unless they fit your asthetic. Once they have been exposed to the air and lignified (hardened off) they aren't useful as feeding mechanisms anymore. So they need to serve a structural purpose or a point for new roots to grow from. I personally might remove the upper exposed roots and bury the lower portion in. Otherwise your tree isn't too unhappy, it's green and it's breaking buds back to the trunk. Not necessarily hard to do on a juniper but also not always a given that they will.
 
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David M. Martin

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thanks to everyone for the input. I'm taking all the advice, and I'm going to get in touch with the Indianapolis Bonsai Club.
 
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