Nursery San Jose

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RyanFrye

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Nice start and material. I look forward to seeing what you will do with this.
 

october

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Hello Chris...This looks really, really good....

Have you noticed that san jose foliage seems quite unforgiving??? Worse than procumbens. It seems that if you cut the needles with procumbens, it will eventually, still, sprout from the area. With San jose, if the needles are cut, I think that sometimes, nothing will ever happen in that area..

Rob
 

greerhw

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I hate to be a spoil sport, but Marco cuts the crap out of the foliage on my Itowgawa's and they grow like crazy. Maybe it's because they a different variety than Green Mound or San Jose.The only foliage he leaves alone is the foliage he wants to grow longer. NEVER but NEVER pinch junipers, always CUT the STEM and never the foliage. I will show an example the next time I post on my forum at the Vault. By the way , nice job Chris,

Ciao,
Harry
 
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october

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Hello Chris and Harry... I believe I read this article before. I will have to double check it though... I know exactly what you mean about not cutting. However, there are circumstances, especially in intial stylings that foilage must be cut. Sometimes, there is no way around it.

Harry, Shimpaku is a whole another story....Although junipers require proper pruning techniques at the proper time (like most species). The shimpakus seem to recover extremely quickly from almost any kind of pruning and pinching...Sometimes you see where a procumbens or like species was pinched too much and a section died. I have not seen this with shimpaku. Well, not yet anyway..lol

Rob
 

october

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p.s. I just wanted to clarify what I meant buy cutting foliage. Not necessarilly cutting the folige, per say. Rather cutting a leggy piece back to where it originates.

Rob
 

greerhw

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Hello Chris and Harry... I believe I read this article before. I will have to double check it though... I know exactly what you mean about not cutting. However, there are circumstances, especially in intial stylings that foilage must be cut. Sometimes, there is no way around it.

Harry, Shimpaku is a whole another story....Although junipers require proper pruning techniques at the proper time (like most species). The shimpakus seem to recover extremely quickly from almost any kind of pruning and pinching...Sometimes you see where a procumbens or like species was pinched too much and a section died. I have not seen this with shimpaku. Well, not yet anyway..lol

Rob

Hey Rob, how ya doing. I prune my shimps all growing season when the top branches start to cover up the lower branches and they don't mind a bit, they are one tough tree, the only problem is, sometimes they drop a branch for no apparent reason.

Ciao,
Harry
 

october

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Funny you had mentioned about them dropping a branch.. Shimpakus will just lose a branch sometimes.. Shimpakus are somewhat known for a branch dying for seemingly no reason.

Also, I have no doubt that Marco cuts the hell out of you shimps. However, he most likely follows the guideline of cutting it back to something. With all junipers, it is a good idea to cut it back to something. By this I mean, cutting the piece of foliage right back to where it originated or cutting it off right at the piece where you would want to train a new leader for that area.

Also, as Chris said. about not cutting juniopers... After a tree reaches an almost finished state...meaning all branches are ramified in their proper places, If you are diligent and keep up with the tasks.....All you will have to do is pinch, mostly, and also just cut new buds that appear in the crevaces. However, sometimes it is easy to fall behind. I sometimes do and come spring, I need to scissor prune. Then pinch for the rest of the season.

Rob
 

Vance Wood

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I really like what you are doing with this tree, give credit where credit is due, nice job. Maybe it is now safe to start posting nursery trees again? For the last couple of years the cause-celeb has been if your tree was not gathered from the mountains or cultured by a professional bonsai grower it was not worth posting.
 

greerhw

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Chris, can I offer another possible, more kk than your front, just playing around and rather crude, but you get the idea.

Ciao,
Harry
 

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PeterW

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Chris, please can you ID this tree for me if possible. It was purchased as a San Jose Juniper, and i believe it to be one, but i have never had or seen one before. It was from a friends collection he is selling as he is retiring and going traveling. It looks to me like it has been styled early on in its life but has been allowed to grow out too far. It has a lot of problems but hopefully i will be able to bring it back. You mentioned that when your tree gets all adult scale foliage, does the adult foliage come with age? I have thinned my tree out to let light in and so i could see whats there myself. I have cut most of the scale foliage off, back to needles. The needles have an almost blue-ish colour to them. The tree doesnt look much but it has a trunk width of about 7cm (3") and is about 50cm (20") tall. Thanks Chris
 

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TheSteve

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Okay, I'm not Chris but it looks like a San Jose to me. I prefer the needle foliage myself but that's just me. If you stay with the juvenile foliage then the tree will have all the same foliage. If you try to maintain scale foliage you will never be able to allow new growth on the tree.
 

Vance Wood

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Okay, I'm not Chris but it looks like a San Jose to me. I prefer the needle foliage myself but that's just me. If you stay with the juvenile foliage then the tree will have all the same foliage. If you try to maintain scale foliage you will never be able to allow new growth on the tree.

I agree. The scale foliage on a SJ is too coarse to be attractive and you are right about there always being both on the same tree; I call it the Peter Pan Juniper it refuses to grow up but looks better as a child.
 

Smoke

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I agree. The scale foliage on a SJ is too coarse to be attractive and you are right about there always being both on the same tree; I call it the Peter Pan Juniper it refuses to grow up but looks better as a child.


Now thats a good one!
 

BONSAI GARAGE

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Here's a shot of a branch on my San Jose's Apex. Which for no reason decided to die. :mad: Only the good die young.
 

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TheSteve

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BG if you follow your dieing apex down to the last living part you'll probably find a small crack from when you wired it. Alot of times that's all it takes for these. It'll stay green for months then fade out in the spring.
 

greerhw

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BG if you follow your dieing apex down to the last living part you'll probably find a small crack from when you wired it. Alot of times that's all it takes for these. It'll stay green for months then fade out in the spring.


Spider mites love SJ's, be sure to check often.

Harry
 

TheSteve

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I agree Harry but since this is the entire apex I'm betting it cracked. Spider mites affect the whole tree.
 

greerhw

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I agree Harry but since this is the entire apex I'm betting it cracked. Spider mites affect the whole tree.


I suspect you're right, just a warning, I lost one to spider mites once.

Harry
 

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