Nursery Stock Masterpieces

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I thought I would start a thread featuring only great bonsai created from nursery stock, since I promised to do so in another thread.

I will add to this thread as new trees are sent to me or are found. Please feel free to add any that you know of.



Will
 
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The following image is hotlinked from Warren Hill's site.

SharonAndWistaria.jpg

Two beautiful ladies...
Sharon Hill and a 45 inch (114cm) Wisteria floribunda, Cv. " rosea "
purchased as one gallon nursery stock in 1965.
 
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The following is hotlinked from Morten Albek's blog at KoB.

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2007 Cotoneaster horisontalis, Mame-bonsai

Winter time shows the beauty of the almost naked branches, with only few leaves and some nice red berries left from fall. It has taken almost ten years from the tree was started from raw nursery material.
 

BONSAI_OUTLAW

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What a great idea for a thread. I would also like to add that is one good looking wisteria.
 
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The following link is from a IBC thread and was created by C J Leo.

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This is a Leptospermun Scoparium Pink Cascade. Under training for the last 5 years from common nursery stock.
Height 19cm.


The next link is from a IBC thread and is by Walter Pall, it was created by air-layering a tree from a common nursery.

index.php



Here is another IBC thread with a nice little bonsai by Morten Albek.

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Rhododendron lysolepsis.
Height: 18cm / 7 inches. Nursery stock. In training since 2002. Age app. 1960. Pot: John Pitt (UK).


Here's another creation by C J Leo from a IBC Thread.

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Of all my Melaleuca bonsais, this Melaleuca Incana Nana is the only one which flowers. Not bad for a few $ nursery stock


We will end our little tour of IBC here with a few pictures from another thread from IBC by Walter Pall showing some great trees from The Pacific Rim Collection .

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San Jose juniper, in training for 50 years, from the Mr Mas Moriguchi collection. Purchased as nursery stock in a one gallon container in 1956!


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Creeping juniper raft by John Naka, in training for 49 years. This was John Naka’s fourth composition. Originally 5 gallon nursery stock that he shaped into a conventional group planting in 1955, he restyled it in 1969, planting it on this Mexican volcanic rock




Will
 
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What defines "masterpiece"?
No sense getting into this really, I am sure we can all agree that the bonsai above are exceptional, many created by world-reknowned masters of the art.

I did however fully expect someone to pop up and say such or such was not a masterpiece, this is fine, I will be posting far more than these few, enough to show that great bonsai can and have been created from nursery stock, some even from $5 stock.

However, for those who honestly do not know....


Masterpiece

noun

Definition:

1. great artistic work: an exceptionally good piece of creative work, e.g. a book, movie, or performance




Will
 
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Tachigi

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Will, your title uses the word masterpieces. The lovely images you've shared are nice, to my eye possibly 3 of them could be considered in the realm of masterpieces. I am wondering why you would include the additional photos? Have I missed something?
 

Rick Moquin

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I have to side with Tom on this one. The Naka raft I am not to fussy about, regardless of the creator. I am surprise that John would actually attach his name to it.

You started off good Will, don't dilute it with mediocrity.
 
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Will, your title uses the word masterpieces. The lovely images you've shared are nice, to my eye possibly 3 of them could be considered in the realm of masterpieces. I am wondering why you would include the additional photos? Have I missed something?

Please list those you feel are not.


Meanwhile let me repeat what I said eariler....

No sense getting into this really, I am sure we can all agree that the bonsai above are exceptional, many created by world-reknowned masters of the art.

I did however fully expect someone to pop up and say such or such was not a masterpiece, this is fine, I will be posting far more than these few, enough to show that great bonsai can and have been created from nursery stock, some even from $5 stock.


Will
 

agraham

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At the risk of offending Will's sensibilities,I wouldn't consider any of those pictured masterpieces.

The wisteria is certainly a horticultural accomplishment and an incredibly showy bonsai.

The cotoneaster is the closest to a masterpiece as has been posted yet...but not quite, in my opinion.

Walter Pall's maple is mediocre compared to many other of his works.

The Pacific Rim photos are excellent examples of very good bonsai,but not identified as to how they originated.The very best...again in my opinion....had the patina of age unlikely to be achieved without a great deal of time,where ever and how ever they originated.

Connecting a famous name to a tree does not make it a masterpiece.

Just so Will doesn't think I'm picking on him:D ...let me say that I agree with him that a "masterpiece" and/or at the least,a very good bonsai can be started by using nursery material.I think that "the very best bonsai in the world" (as in the very best bonsai in the world are yamadori)as Jason would say, is a phrase that is useless.Some people like Picasso and some like Rembrandt.Some like rugged ancient gnarly conifers and some like graceful broadleaves.As I've stated before...I think the best trees in the world are the ficus from Taiwan.It's a cultural thing:) .

Unlike Chris,I find the discussion interesting and worthwhile reading.Unlike many,I won't try to convince anyone that I am right and they are wrong.

I also will not post any of my trees as examples of great trees grown from nursery stock or(in my case) cuttings.If I WERE trying to convince anyone that you could grow great trees from nursery stock,so doing would defeat my purpose.

Everyone should remember that even yamadori started as seedlings.With enough time and effort...and skill...nature's harsh treatments can be duplicated.
andy
 
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I have to side with Tom on this one. The Naka raft I am not to fussy about, regardless of the creator. I am surprise that John would actually attach his name to it.

John created it, from nursery stock, he obviously did not feel such material was beneath him or worthless.

The object of the IBC post was to show that many artists, some world renowned, also use nursery stock for bonsai. I pulled up just a few of dozens of such trees at IBC while I wait for more examples.

Enjoy what you like while realizing they are all from nursery stock. I have no intention of debating which are better than others, they are all great trees that most would be proud to have created from any material.


More trees will be forthcoming.


Andy,

Please read posts 9 and 12 so I don't have to repeat myself.


Will
 
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agraham

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Please list those you feel are not..

No sense getting into this really, I am sure we can all agree that the bonsai above are exceptional, many created by world-reknowned masters of the art.




Will

Will,

This is where we don't all agree.They are not all exceptional...and I don't mind repeating myself...attaching a famous name or "created by a world renowned master" to a tree does NOT make it an exceptional tree or even a good one.The title of the thread is "Nursery Stock Masterpieces" and you have provided examples that fall far short of that designation, in my opinion.I have no doubt that there are some out there,though.

andy
 
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Andy,

It really doesn't matter what I post, some will argue the point. More photos are coming, judge them however you will.

Meanwhile, let's use this definition.... a masterpiece is anything that is better than what you personally have created.


Or we can use the one posted already....


Masterpiece

noun

Definition:

1. great artistic work: an exceptionally good piece of creative work, e.g. a book, movie, or performance


The bold is mine.


Meanwhile, instead of arguing the point, pick one you don't like, take it to another new thread and critique it. We all might learn something. In short pick those you don't like, tell us why they are not exceptional in another thread, and use it as an educational experience.


Will
 

Behr

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Mr. Will,

Thank you for posting these trees as examples of what may be achieved with less than perfect material...I firmly believe it is not as much the stock as the 'finished product' which is most important...What has the 'artist' been able to accomplish with the stock he has to work with...I look forward to seeing more examples of good trees...

These are by no means to be considered “masterpieces” [if there is actually such a thing in bonsai], but they are both common nursery stock...In fact, I would not even consider them to be 'great bonsai', but I also would not be ashamed to show them with the 'great bonsai' presented here thus far...

The first is a yaupon holly acquired from Wal-Mart on Austin Hwy. in San Antonio, Texas for the sum of $9.95 USD...The second is a rosemary acquired from 'Fanick's Landscape Nursery' in San Antonio, Texas for the sum of $1.00 [one dollar] USD...

Regards
Behr

:) :) :)
 

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Tachigi

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It really doesn't matter what I post, some will argue the point.

Will, I say this with all sincerity and due respect. In this case we are debating the content not the author.

Definition:
1. great artistic work: an exceptionally good piece of creative work, e.g. a book, movie, or performance
I agree with this definition. Not the examples of the definition
 
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Thanks for saying that again Tom, now how about taking those you think fall short to another thread and tell us why?



Will
 

ianb

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Will,

This is where we don't all agree.They are not all exceptional...and I don't mind repeating myself...attaching a famous name or "created by a world renowned master" to a tree does NOT make it an exceptional tree or even a good one.The title of the thread is "Nursery Stock Masterpieces" and you have provided examples that fall far short of that designation, in my opinion.I have no doubt that there are some out there,though.

andy

Amen Andy, I couldn't agree more, these are nice trees though in most cases not exceptional or masterpieces. To see some exceptional trees you might try here:

http://www.artofbonsai.org/galleries/ginkgo.php

Cheers
Ian
 

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