Olive Forest

AndyWilson

Mame
Messages
106
Reaction score
7
Location
South Africa
I saw this at the recent SABA convention. i thought i would post it here to see what you guys think. It is my favourite item from the convention. This has been documented in several local books.
 

Attachments

  • olive forest.jpg
    olive forest.jpg
    37.5 KB · Views: 307
Messages
1,773
Reaction score
13
Location
Ottawa, KS
USDA Zone
6
Andy, I like this tree, thanks for posting it! My one question is that it seems to me a little bit static. It's possible, of course, that a serene mood was the obect fo the artist.
 

AndyWilson

Mame
Messages
106
Reaction score
7
Location
South Africa
I got the same feeling Chris, i think it has something to do with the Crown on this forest, there is something there that isnt quite right. I was hoping by posting some fresh eyes could tell me!
 

Rick Moquin

Omono
Messages
1,245
Reaction score
9
Location
Dartmouth, NS Canada
USDA Zone
6a
IMO with the varying tree heights the artist could have sculped them individually instead of a whole. The distance between the trees would support this.

Having said that it appears that the trees are almost coming from the same plane, and hence there is no apparent depth to the composition. IMO if you want to create a single canopy, then group the trees together, not planted in more or less a single row.
 

grog

Shohin
Messages
385
Reaction score
21
Location
Iowa
USDA Zone
5
To my untrained eye if there's an issue it's one of perspective.

I think the placement of the "bones" of the tree does a very good job of giving the feeling of depth but for some reason when I get up to the canopy I lose that perception. Perhaps too sudden a height change with the main tree compared to the others?

Also, while the base of the main tree is a bit offset of center it looks like the canopy is smack dab in the middle of the pot. As said before though, this may have been intentional to give a more stable feeling.

With all that said, it's a beautiful composition and I'd be mighty proud to create something like that.
 

pslguy1983

Seedling
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
Location
PSL, South Florida
USDA Zone
10b
Forests are going to be my thing

I saw this at the recent SABA convention. i thought i would post it here to see what you guys think. It is my favourite item from the convention. This has been documented in several local books.

Sorry so late in the year to answer this but I like this picture as well. good work done here.
See yourself in a forest, would you like to be in one with few trees ? or a little more secluded.
picture forest animals seeking shelter there. would they like it open or a little thicker cover to hide themselves. That's how I answer own questions building a forest.
I have a pic of a forest with 11 trees for my wallpaper.
 

Ken Duncan

Sapling
Messages
42
Reaction score
8
Location
South Carolina
USDA Zone
8
I like this forest the trees have a feeling of age and look very natural. The thing that bothers me the most is that I can not tell the movement of this group. Some trees seem to show movement to the left and some show movement to the right.
I think that there should be a defined movement to the right or the left and the whole group should be planted on the right or the left, not in the middle. Which one looks best?
Ken
 

Attachments

  • move l 532X412.jpg
    move l 532X412.jpg
    39.4 KB · Views: 57
  • move r 532X412.jpg
    move r 532X412.jpg
    39.1 KB · Views: 56
Messages
2,776
Reaction score
18
Location
Michigan, USA
USDA Zone
5
The pot does nothing for this forest at all, I think it needs a slab, certainly a better one than the Slab Pot from Erin Pottery I used in this quick virt, but I think the idea gets across.


Will
 

Attachments

  • test.jpg
    test.jpg
    46.7 KB · Views: 75
  • test2.jpg
    test2.jpg
    22.5 KB · Views: 51
Last edited:

Ken Duncan

Sapling
Messages
42
Reaction score
8
Location
South Carolina
USDA Zone
8
How about a stone slab?
Ken
 

Attachments

  • tree w slab 541X419.jpg
    tree w slab 541X419.jpg
    39.2 KB · Views: 71
Messages
2,776
Reaction score
18
Location
Michigan, USA
USDA Zone
5
Ken,

That's it, I like that a lot, it is amazing what a pot will do, isn't it?


Great virt,


Will
 

Attila Soos

Omono
Messages
1,804
Reaction score
33
Location
Los Angeles (Altadena), CA
USDA Zone
9
A slab is always nice for group planting because it is more effective in creating the feeling of open space.
But that original pot is not too bad. To me, it still does a decent job, although not as original as with a slab.

By the way, those slabs (especially the large ones) are pretty tough to come by.
Can anyone refresh our memories here, as to resourses on how to make those artificial slabs at home? I remember seing instructions in some books and even websites, but I don't remember where.

As an afterthought, I think Su Chin Ee has some instructions in "Creating Bonsai Lanscapes". I am also thinking about going to some of our Lanscaping Stone Yards (places that sell rocks for lanscape contractors) and look for Shale and other type of stratified stones that could do the job. The biggest challenge in that case would be to learn how to cut those stones to the right size and shape, using a chisel and a hammer.
 
Last edited:

irene_b

Omono
Messages
1,415
Reaction score
2
A slab is always nice for group planting because it is more effective in creating the feeling of open space.
But that original pot is not too bad. To me, it still does a decent job.

By the way, those slabs (especially the large ones) are pretty tough to come by.
Can anyone refresh our memories here, as to resourses on how to make those artificial slabs at home? I remember seing instructions in some books and even websites, but I don't remember where.


I think Dale Cochoy posted on a how to for the slabs....
If not hopefully he will post one here...
Irene
 

Rick Moquin

Omono
Messages
1,245
Reaction score
9
Location
Dartmouth, NS Canada
USDA Zone
6a
Colin Lewis

Sue Chin Ee is another source

The biggest challenge in that case would be to learn how to cut those stones to the right size and shape, using a chisel and a hammer.
... and that is easier said than done. I ruined a few just short of the last few chips. it is definitely an art, you have to understand stones I guess.
 
Last edited:

Bob

Mame
Messages
148
Reaction score
0
Location
Aliquippa, Pa.
USDA Zone
6
Home made slab

The I.B.C. has an article written by John Quinn about making a concrete slab. Go to www.internetbonsaiclub.org, click on "Knowledge Base" then "Articles and Essays" then "The Art of Bonsai" and finally "Creating cement slabs for group plantings".
 
Last edited:
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
IMO with the varying tree heights the artist could have sculped them individually instead of a whole. The distance between the trees would support this.

Agreed. And the second tree from the left seems to be growing INTO the shadow of the largest.

Having said that it appears that the trees are almost coming from the same plane, and hence there is no apparent depth to the composition.

I don't see that. There are clearly three trees on two other plains behind the major tree. What is hindering the impression of depth is the lack of weight behind the major tree. I crave another branch on the tree behind/left of the main tree (see circled area).

the whole group should be planted on the right or the left, not in the middle.

I second that one too.
 

Attachments

  • olive forest2.JPG
    olive forest2.JPG
    39.2 KB · Views: 29

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
Messages
9,211
Reaction score
16,862
Location
Charlotte area, North Carolina
USDA Zone
7B
I think that the composition feels static because it is so symmetrical. Not just the center planting position within the pot, but the fact that you have a seven tree composition with the tallest tree perfectly in the center with 3 small trees to each side. The smaller trees are even symmetrical in their placement - the first trees next to the center tree are in the back, then two are forward, etc. The foilage is almost a perfect equilateral triangle. It does not look natural to me at all - it looks like a formal English garden instead of a bonsai.
 

AndyWilson

Mame
Messages
106
Reaction score
7
Location
South Africa
Thanks all for the suggestions, i will be seeing the new owner of this composition soon and will put the ideas to her.

BTW a few of the "problem" trees are actually later editions, i am trying to track down an earlier pic where two of the trees were in different positions.
 

johng

Omono
Messages
1,595
Reaction score
2,348
Forest Remix

Hello Andy... I looked at this forest for a long time and thought I would try to move the trees around some. This may not be achievable for the fact that turning trees around in a 2d perspective is rarely what you get in reality. However the intent was to try a create a little more interest. I have always thought that it is extremely important that a forest have a couple of instances of trunks growing very closely together...for me this creates a more natural feel. Recreating this in a virtual is very difficult and can be a little misleading...but I think something along these lines may be achievable.

John
 

Attachments

  • oliveslabremix.jpg
    oliveslabremix.jpg
    35.4 KB · Views: 47
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Fl. , U.S.A.
USDA Zone
9A
I was think it needed to ne opened up some like this.
 

Attachments

  • f5.JPG
    f5.JPG
    30.9 KB · Views: 26

Bill S

Masterpiece
Messages
2,494
Reaction score
20
Location
Western Massachusetts
USDA Zone
5a
I concur nice job Ken.

I see the trunks working well with the canopy, as each bends to give it's own canopy an avenue to the light working around the main tree. Shows each trees early struggle to become part of the final forest. Serene is OK. Depth and alignment from the photo are tough to tell but I get a feeling from the trunk movement that they arent set in a single plane.
 

Similar threads

Top