Olive SUMO

akhater

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I have picked up from the forest today this wild olive tree but it looks I did a mistake and didn't take too much roots with it :(

To help it recover I have covered it with a plastic bag so it is more humid. I kept 2 branches with leaves on it should I remove them ?

If it recovers I want to do a SUMO olive from it. Any advise ?

thanks
 

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PaulH

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I've collected olives with no roots and they do fine. Treat them like a large cutting. I usually saw the bottom flat before planting.
I'd go ahead and cut that tall skinny top off if your goal is a sumo style. I should bud all over the base.
Keeping it humid is a good idea but I'm concerned the plastic bag might cook it.
Lastly, I'm concerned about your soil. It looks much too coarse, or are those large rocks just top dressing?

Paul
 

akhater

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Thank you Paul !

I was wondering exactly if I should remove the top or leave some leaves...

I didn't flatten the base I had in mind to do it next spring when it has more roots is his bad ?

For the "cooking" it is in a shady area the sun doesn't enter there a lot and I have a lot of cuttings or freshly repotted plants there all with plastic bags and they are all doing fine.

Finally about the soil yes it is coarse it is expanded clay not rocks about 5 mm diameter 100% inorganic and very draining. I have been trying to switch to this substrate from organic.

thanks again for your help
 

monza

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Your soil, have you looked for a product called chicken/poultry grit. I'm assuming some chickens are raised over there and grit is a part of their diet. Sorry to side track the olive thread, just don't know if that was mentioned in your other soil discussions.
 
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akhater

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Your soil, have you look for a product for called chicken/poultry grit. I'm assuming some chickens are raised over there and grit is a part of their diet. Sorry to side track the olive thread, just don't know if that was mentioned in your other soil discussions.

You mean you can plant in chiken grit ? it won't clutter and become non draining ?

My understanding is, at the right time of year you can completely "flat cut" the base of olives with no roots and transplant them this way.

http://www.dugzbonsai.com/olivehead1.htm

Impressive ! I really wonder if/how this works, I'd be happy enough with my small olive with some roots to recover

PaulH said:
I'd go ahead and cut that tall skinny top off if your goal is a sumo style.
I have cut 1/2 of the skinny part I left it without any leaves, was afraid of the die-back I guess, now it is time to let it recover
 
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monza

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You mean you can plant in chiken grit ? it won't clutter and become non draining ?

Yes chicken grit is the 'drain' most grit is crushed granite, you'll still need some thing for water retention and a organic of some sort. (some grit is crushed sea shells (I think) you don't want that) Search farm supply/feed stores.
 
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rockm

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"Yes chicken grit is the 'drain' most grit is crushed granite, you'll still need some thing for water retention and a organic of some sort. (some grit is crushed sea shells (I think) you don't want that) Search farm supply/feed stores."

Be VERY careful in finding poultry grit. The above is true for NORTH AMERICA. Since you are in Lebanon, things might be different. Crushed oyster shells and other things are sold as grit in other places. I have seen pigeon grit that was flint, but had added anise oil flavoring (I guess pigeons are gourmets). Oil is about the worst thing you can put in soil...

Look for grit that is some kind of crushed, but inert -- won't dissolve -- stone
 

akhater

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nearly one month later this little guy shows its first bud at the base, guess it is a good sign right ?
 

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akhater

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I think this one is looking good
 

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