One seed junipers

Dwight

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Well I finally put my " money " where my mouth was and went out digging. The Albuquerque club had a dig this past week end and I was fortunate enough to go along. We collecter on a private ranch where there are pinpn pines one seed juniper and alligator juniper. As a rank beginner at this side of the hobby I stuck to smaller trees and ended up with three one seed junies. These are beautiful trees and some I saw would make a calli blush with envy. They tend to have less dead wood ( a less hostile environment ) but their foilage is georgeous. Reminda me of kishu shimpacu.

I've attached pics of two of these varmits before they were trimmed up. The soil was very rocky so getting large messes of roots were sort of out of the question hense the radical trim. If they survive I'll post pics of their current status.
 

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milehigh_7

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Look at that grin! Seems you had a good time! Awesome, now I can't wait to see what you do with 'em.
 

grouper52

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Oh frabjous day, callooh, callay!

Dwight! Welcome aboard! There's no turning back now . . .

Those should be a lot of fun. Keep us posted. :)

Will
 

Dwight

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Some more pics. First the largest of the two pictured above. He's had a severe haircut to match the reduction in roots but seems to be doing OK. It's been two weeks and some new growth has started to show.
 

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Dwight

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Next is the smaller of the two. It's showing signs of growth as well. As far as a future goes I can see a lot more in this tree than the first. It has some nice dead wood ( a dead secondary trunk for starters ) and a nice trunk. The foilage on these guys is real nice. It compares favorably with shimpacu and J.horizantalis. Some of the folk in the Albuqiuerque club have some of these that are decades old ( as captives ) with lush , thick foilage. When I first saw them I thought they were a viriety of shimp with slightly longer needles. The mature trees ( some are 30 + ft high ) are georgeous.
 

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Dwight

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Finally a little guy I poped outa the ground when we were eating lunch and I got bored. He's only about 18" tall and has a trunk about 1" X 1.5" but he has character written all over him. This guy was kinda yellow when I grabed him but he has greened up nicely and actually grown the most
 

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Dwight

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All have been in the greenhouse with the humidifier set at about 65% ever since they got home ( about two weeks ). None are showing any signs of distressand all show some growth. I suspect some if not all this growth has nothing to do with me but was stored in the trees even before I cane along. Keep your fingers crossed , maybe beginners luck will strike. After the losses from the freeze I sure hope so.
 

sorce

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@petegreg does pic number 3557 remind you of anything!?:rolleyes:

Sorry to hear that Dwight.

Sorce
 

petegreg

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...little bit. My trunks grow from one level, if you mean mugo.
 

Vance Wood

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It is one thing to go out and dig trees but the after care is the most important aspect of the process. You can't just throw them into the general population so to speak but, I have found in my experience with stressed out Junipers, Shimpakus mostly, that a good deal of shade for a while is important to them. If you are keeping these trees with the others and treating them with a perceived austerity at to watering and sun exposure that is probably why you are losing trees. It is not enough to say "I am the kiss of death to collected trees" and take that as a fact. The fact is you are doing something wrong----and that can be corrected. Someone who does collect trees needs to publish a thread on the subject of after care.
 
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aml1014

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It is one thing to go out and dig trees but the after care is the most important aspect of the process. You can't just throw them into the general population so to speak but I have found in my experience with stressed out Junipers that a good deal of shade for a while is important to them.
I plan on digging a few next spring from a friend's land.
The unfortunate thing about the oneseed juniper is that the species has some of the deepest roots of any tree on earth. One was extracted and it had a 297' deep taproot, that's so deep that tree was in a totally different world lol. These trees are definitely something to respect, MANY MANY ancients round here.

Aaron
 

Vance Wood

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I plan on digging a few next spring from a friend's land.
The unfortunate thing about the oneseed juniper is that the species has some of the deepest roots of any tree on earth. One was extracted and it had a 297' deep taproot, that's so deep that tree was in a totally different world lol. These trees are definitely something to respect, MANY MANY ancients round here.

Aaron
Knowing that, you must make sure that you locate a lot of roots above the depth of that tap root and carefully harvest them as well. If there are not lateral roots then I would GPSing the tree after I undercut the tree and severed the tap root. Return in two years and collect the tree.
 

aml1014

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Knowing that, you must make sure that you locate a lot of roots above the depth of that tap root and carefully harvest them as well. If there are not lateral roots then I would GPSing the tree after I undercut the tree and severed the tap root. Return in two years and collect the tree.
That's the main plan, I also will be looking for the good ole rock pocket junipers which are rare but are around.

Heres a couple beauties I always go and admire, I may try to get the cascade within the next 4 or 5 years, the other is absolutely impossible, it's growing on a 100 ft cliff.20151110_121248.jpg 20151110_121235.jpg
And the impossible 20151013_124833.jpg 20151013_124842.jpg
20151013_124909.jpg
I wish I had better pictures.

Aaron
 

Dwight

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Aaron , you'regonna need dynamite or a front end loader for that one. I've been trying to collect from a friends ranch in the Organ Mts just east of Las Cruces. Like you he has one-seed and alligator.
I've tried everything that I can find and that I've been told and still nothing. I've got a couple that I dug half way and root pruned the heck out of that I may try to lift this year. Each time I check on them they seem to have more roots around the base so maybe this will work. Thats what they do in Tuscon.
 

PiñonJ

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I plan on digging a few next spring from a friend's land.
The unfortunate thing about the oneseed juniper is that the species has some of the deepest roots of any tree on earth. One was extracted and it had a 297' deep taproot, that's so deep that tree was in a totally different world lol. These trees are definitely something to respect, MANY MANY ancients round here.

Aaron
Aaron, if you have easy access, go water them a few times prior to collection, unless there's a good rain forecast. That's what I did with the one I dug from my land. It's on year two now and growing strong. It was six feet tall, but I pruned it in the ground the year prior to collection. I've done a couple of minor branch prunings since then, and got it in a bonsai pot this spring. I'll do it's first major styling next spring. The roots can take some abuse if you leave the foliage alone. That's a piñon stump next to it.
IMG_1293.JPG IMG_1300.JPG
 
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