Overwintering my trees

Dr3z

Yamadori
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So last year I only had a couple trees...now I have more. Just checking to see if my overwinter plans are solid or if I'm missing anything.

I have many of my Yamadori in training pots half or fully buried in the ground, some with plastic to protect the trunks from squirrels, voles etc. I've even planted a few (2 dogwoods and 2 oaks) to give them a few years in the ground to thicken up.

I've moved some pots and seeds that need cold stratification into the shed with spring bulbs so the squirrels don't eat/move them.

Some pots that were too nice for burying are moved into the shed for better protection.

A couple of my favorites (deciduous like a JM and a hornbeam, an azealia and two juniper) are in the garage.

Questions: those that are in the shed and garage will still get their cold period of dormancy. They will still need a small amount of water, correct? The deciduous trees probably don't need light, but will the Juniper and such be fine without? The shed and garage do have windows but they will get very limited light.

Thanks for the advice!
 

Eckhoffw

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Questions: those that are in the shed and garage will still get their cold period of dormancy. They will still need a small amount of water, correct? The deciduous trees probably don't need light, but will the Juniper and such be fine without? The shed and garage do have windows but they will get very limited light.

Thanks for the advice!
Yes I believe they will. I’ve heard trees in the temperature northern hemisphere need anywhere between 40 and 60 days under 40°F for dormancy.
Still a newb to this but I’ve added light in my garage Cold frame structure. I hear more and more that all trees -not just conifers or evergreens can benefit from light. I would say almost no trees live in complete darkness during dormancy in nature.
of course there is a lot of speculation on this.
Like @Colorado stated, don’t let dormant trees dry out! I lost 2 JMs and a trident maple last year to dry out in cold frame.
 

Dr3z

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Sounds like a plan; I'm thinking my favorite deciduous in garage to get more regular attention is the best bet then and I'll limit those in the shed.

I'm in 6b, Precumbens nana is rated to 4 and Juniperus virginiana 3 (but in a very shallow pot); am I pushing it to maybe keep them on the deck? I've heard you lose approximately 2 zones in the pot.
 

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
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Sounds like a plan; I'm thinking my favorite deciduous in garage to get more regular attention is the best bet then and I'll limit those in the shed.

I'm in 6b, Precumbens nana is rated to 4 and Juniperus virginiana 3 (but in a very shallow pot); am I pushing it to maybe keep them on the deck? I've heard you lose approximately 2 zones in the pot.
Both should be rock solid outside in your climate, though if place them on the ground out of the sun if possible.
 

sorce

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The reason I have become so anti "sayings" as of late, is because the opposite has become so stigmatized, we don't keep a healthy understanding of when it is actually useful.

I think this is a case when it's best to keep all your eggs on one basket.

The idea of having a collection of trees that can all be simply left on the ground, below where they were, while simultaneously allowing you all the variation ie, flowers, maples, conifers, D's, evergreens, broad-leaved evergreens, etc etc etc, is wholly possible of you set your mind to it.

I'd argue the time spent figuring how to assemble this collection ONCE, is better than the confusion, dead trees and dead designs of trying to figure 3 different wintering spaces, during a time you will one day cherish as a time to relax.

Sorce
 

coh

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Set out some traps in the shed, maybe the garage too. Mice can do a lot of damage in a short amount of time.

As for watering, I check my trees every time we get a thaw. Some trees make it through the winter with little need for water, others require more...depends on the species, pot size/shape, soil...over time you'll learn which ones need more water. I put those
near the front of my shelters to make it easier to get to them. Early on I lost a few nice trunks because I neglected to check them enough during the winter and they dried out.

Trees don't "need" light when dormant. Evergreens might benefit but I haven't had any issues with keeping most of my trees in pretty dark areas.
 

vp999

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I left all my trees out side the last couple years and never water them, all the water they get is from the rain and they all did fine. And it rains maybe once every 10 days or so here in the DC area.
 

leatherback

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Sounds like a plan; I'm thinking my favorite deciduous in garage to get more regular attention is the best bet then and I'll limit those in the shed.
Really think what needs protection and what not. Early waking up, no-frost hardiness & late frost spells, drying out.. All problems that can be avoided by keeping trees outside for winter.

I only protect species that really need it (e.g. olives) and trees that had some big work done to them just as frost arrived (e.g., my recently repotted elm, with 90% root removal). But I live in the tropics compared to you!
 

Potawatomi13

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I've moved some pots and seeds that need cold stratification into the shed with spring bulbs so the squirrels don't eat/move them.
Will still need protection in Spring from digging in pots, pulling up sprouts😣.
 

Eckhoffw

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The ‘bunker’ this year at new house.
been really dry and warmer than usual here,so I think I will water these today. 4301762D-8D8E-4C34-9443-02139DFFF50F.jpeg
 

SouthernMaple

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So last year I only had a couple trees...now I have more. Just checking to see if my overwinter plans are solid or if I'm missing anything.

I have many of my Yamadori in training pots half or fully buried in the ground, some with plastic to protect the trunks from squirrels, voles etc. I've even planted a few (2 dogwoods and 2 oaks) to give them a few years in the ground to thicken up.

I've moved some pots and seeds that need cold stratification into the shed with spring bulbs so the squirrels don't eat/move them.

Some pots that were too nice for burying are moved into the shed for better protection.

A couple of my favorites (deciduous like a JM and a hornbeam, an azealia and two juniper) are in the garage.

Questions: those that are in the shed and garage will still get their cold period of dormancy. They will still need a small amount of water, correct? The deciduous trees probably don't need light, but will the Juniper and such be fine without? The shed and garage do have windows but they will get very limited light.

Thanks for the advice!
Maples ideally need 1000 hours below 40F
 

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