Pear Rust at new house... How do I protect my Junipers?

akraftbeer

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So here's the situation:

My wife and I just closed on a house this week and are super excited. There are a couple of apple trees and a pear tree in the back yard. Upon closer inspection, almost ALL of the leaves on the pear tree are showing pear rust (which looks quite nasty, let me tell you).

I was planning on moving all of my trees to the new house this weekend, but REALLY don't want the rust to affect any of my junipers that I've just put some serious money (for me) and time into.

Any advice?

I would like to keep the pear tree (due to privacy), but would consider cutting it down and planting a new tree as well.
Is it enough to simply cut off all of the branches with rust?

Anything is appreciated!
 

penumbra

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Your area and climate are quite different than mine so I am not sure what the recommended treatment and spray schedule is for you. Hopefully someone in you area will chime in. I have exactly the reverse problem. There are literally millions of cedars around here and I love crab apples, hawthorns and such. I need to be more regular in my spraying but the spraying I have done helps significantly.
 

Dav4

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So, it's unlikely that you will be able to decrease the environmental component of the fungus significantly enough to prevent your junipers from getting exposed at some level. Certainly, keeping the junipers physically separated from the infected landscape trees can help, as will timely removal and disposal of the infected leaves as they fall. With that being said, a lot depends on what species of juniper you have. I've found that shimpaku, in general, don't seem to get rusts like certain native species do... ERC is a rust magnet and Rocky Mountain Junipers are certainly susceptible in my experience. You may not have to do anything, but you also should probably consider some pre-emptive anti fungal applications if your trees are good enough to warrant it. Unfortunately, I'm beginning to realize that, with warmer winter temperatures, my prophylactic spraying is turning into a year round maintenance issue, at least here in zone 7b GA.
 

Forsoothe!

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Since diseases are endemic, easy to carry around, and need to be dealt with ongoing, I'd leave trouble where it is and buy something else for the new place and hope for the best. If you take it with you, there will be a bad year somewhere down the line, and it will win.
 

akraftbeer

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So, it's unlikely that you will be able to decrease the environmental component of the fungus significantly enough to prevent your junipers from getting exposed at some level. Certainly, keeping the junipers physically separated from the infected landscape trees can help, as will timely removal and disposal of the infected leaves as they fall. With that being said, a lot depends on what species of juniper you have. I've found that shimpaku, in general, don't seem to get rusts like certain native species do... ERC is a rust magnet and Rocky Mountain Junipers are certainly susceptible in my experience. You may not have to do anything, but you also should probably consider some pre-emptive anti fungal applications if your trees are good enough to warrant it. Unfortunately, I'm beginning to realize that, with warmer winter temperatures, my prophylactic spraying is turning into a year round maintenance issue, at least here in zone 7b GA.

Yeah, I have 5 Shimpaku's that are my main concern. I know there are plenty of people in the area that have Shimpaku, but seeing the WHOLE pear tree in rust is what is worrisome to me.
 

akraftbeer

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Since diseases are endemic, easy to carry around, and need to be dealt with ongoing, I'd leave trouble where it is and buy something else for the new place and hope for the best. If you take it with you, there will be a bad year somewhere down the line, and it will win.

Not really looking to get rid of them, and it's only about 25 miles from where I currently live.
 

penumbra

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Not really looking to get rid of them, and it's only about 25 miles from where I currently live.
Though you still haven't heard from someone in your neck of the woods, my visceral instinct is to keep the plants you know and get rid of the offending tree you have only just met. Your junipers are family.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Causal fungi for all the juniper alternating deciduous host Rust diseases are all in the genus Gymnosporangium. Search for fungicides labelled for Gymnosporangium.

Consult you local Ag Extension Office. Or look through the Ag Extension Service IPM websites, Integrated Pest Management. Washington state says no products are labelled for home use. This means you need to explore the RUP products, Restricted Use Pesticides. If you want to use one of them you either have to get a RUP license yourself, about $50 to take the test, another $50 or so for the manuals you need to read, plus the cost of personal protection gear and then the cost of the pesticide. But there is valuable info there. Read, identify the chemical. You can then hire a person with the RUP license to apply the chemicals.

Nebraska website below says Bonide's Mancozeb is labelled for controlling Pear Rust. Read notes about timing. Note: Mancozeb is approved in Nebraska, it may or may not be approved for use in Washington state.


Info from Kansas that links to info from IL & PA.

quote from one of the less helpful documents, they don't tell you which fungicides are labelled for Gymnosporangium. Key is timing is in the passage below.
"Many of the fungicides used to protect deciduous hosts are also labeled for use on Juniperus spp. If fungicides are deemed necessary to protect an evergreen host, they should be applied at two-week intervals during July and August or as directed by specific product label recommendations. (Travis Cleveland) "




chart outlining differences between different cedar rusts.

Penn State page has good photos.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Ah Ha. Found a list of approved fungicides for Washington State


quote:
Chemical control Spray susceptible juniper in the nursery at least three (3) times from mid-August to early October (earlier in California) when aecia are seen on rosaceous hosts.

  • Armada 50 WDG at 3 to 9 oz/100 gal water. Do not use a silicone-based surfactant. Not for nursery or greenhouse use. Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
  • Bayleton 50 T&O at 5.5 oz/275 to 550 gal water. Landscape use only, not for use on plants for sale. Group 3 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
  • Eagle 20 EW at 6 to 12 fl oz/100 gal water. Group 3 fungicide. 24-hr reentry.
  • Mancozeb-based products. Group M3 fungicides. 24-hr reentry.
    • Fore 80 WP at 1.5 lb/100 gal water plus a spreader-sticker.
    • Protect DF at 1 to 2 lb/100 gal water plus 2 to 4 oz spreader-sticker.
  • Mural at 4 to 7 oz/100 gal water. Group 7 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
  • Myclobutanil 20 EW T&O at 6 to 12 fl oz/100 gal water plus spreading agent. May observe a PGR effect. Group 3 fungicide. 24-hr reentry.
  • Terraguard SC at 2 to 8 fl oz/100 gal water. Group 3 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
  • Tourney 50 WDG at 1 to 4 oz/100 gal water. Group 3 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
  • Trigo at 3 to 9 oz/100 gal water. Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
Reference Ormrod, D.J., O'Reilly, H.J., Van Der Kamp, B.J., and Borno, C. 1984. Epidemiology, cultivar susceptibility, and chemical control of Gymnosporangium fuscum in British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology 6:63-70.
 

akraftbeer

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Location
Bothell, WA
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Ah Ha. Found a list of approved fungicides for Washington State


quote:
Chemical control Spray susceptible juniper in the nursery at least three (3) times from mid-August to early October (earlier in California) when aecia are seen on rosaceous hosts.

  • Armada 50 WDG at 3 to 9 oz/100 gal water. Do not use a silicone-based surfactant. Not for nursery or greenhouse use. Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
  • Bayleton 50 T&O at 5.5 oz/275 to 550 gal water. Landscape use only, not for use on plants for sale. Group 3 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
  • Eagle 20 EW at 6 to 12 fl oz/100 gal water. Group 3 fungicide. 24-hr reentry.
  • Mancozeb-based products. Group M3 fungicides. 24-hr reentry.
    • Fore 80 WP at 1.5 lb/100 gal water plus a spreader-sticker.
    • Protect DF at 1 to 2 lb/100 gal water plus 2 to 4 oz spreader-sticker.
  • Mural at 4 to 7 oz/100 gal water. Group 7 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
  • Myclobutanil 20 EW T&O at 6 to 12 fl oz/100 gal water plus spreading agent. May observe a PGR effect. Group 3 fungicide. 24-hr reentry.
  • Terraguard SC at 2 to 8 fl oz/100 gal water. Group 3 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
  • Tourney 50 WDG at 1 to 4 oz/100 gal water. Group 3 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
  • Trigo at 3 to 9 oz/100 gal water. Group 3 + 11 fungicide. 12-hr reentry.
Reference Ormrod, D.J., O'Reilly, H.J., Van Der Kamp, B.J., and Borno, C. 1984. Epidemiology, cultivar susceptibility, and chemical control of Gymnosporangium fuscum in British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology 6:63-70.
Wow! Thank you so much for all of the info! Super helpful!
 

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