Penumbra Stone Age Pot #3

penumbra

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This pot is an asymmetrical deep dish shape. It is my favorite of the three but each has a distinctly different use. The metallic oxide on it is a bit shinier than the others because a different oxide was used. Outside the lowest hieght is about 2.5 "H and the highest point is a bit over 4"H x 10.5 x 10" L&W. Inside it has a minimum height of 2" and a W&L of about 8.5 x 9".
Price and payment are as described in pots #1 & #2.
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penumbra

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If you wouldn't mind elaborating, what uses did you have in mind for this pot and #1?

Just curious, I would hate to blaspheme your beautiful creationso_O
The uses for many and all pots are as varied as there are stars in the sky. But since you asked, #1 pot two me would look charming with a mother daughter planting. Of course it would also look good with a knoll planting or even a small forest. This is just off the top of my head, there are of course many options including those I haven't even considered. #3 pot for me says something gnarled and twisted, but I think a windswept tree or a literati would look good too.
I really am reluctant to give advice about what to do with a pot, but this style is kinda like my thing and I offer these suggestions humbly.
These stone age pots also look great with companion plants and with succulents as well IMO.

Now as to #2 pot which has not sold and which I may end up planting, it is a much deeper pot and I would probably go with a semi-cascade but possibly a literati.
 

cbroad

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I appreciate your advice and was just wondering if you had a vision of what "you" would pot in these while you were making them and adding the glazes.

I agree about using something gnarled. My next tree that is "mostly ready" for a bonsai pot, is a purple leaf sand cherry. I think the yellowish color of the pot will complement the dark purple foliage very well (I'm not exactly color blind but definitely color ignorant, so what do I know...?)

The bark is becoming pretty gnarly on this one and my thought is that it needs a pot that isn't smooth and symmetrical, with clean lines and angles. I have a craggy/fissured looking Ching Wen pot I was planning on using for this tree but I believe it's too small for the tree and the pot color is too similar to the bark color; I feel like the whole composition would be lost.

I think your #3 pot would be perfect, the colors and textures should go well together!
 

penumbra

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I appreciate your advice and was just wondering if you had a vision of what "you" would pot in these while you were making them and adding the glazes.

I agree about using something gnarled. My next tree that is "mostly ready" for a bonsai pot, is a purple leaf sand cherry. I think the yellowish color of the pot will complement the dark purple foliage very well (I'm not exactly color blind but definitely color ignorant, so what do I know...?)

The bark is becoming pretty gnarly on this one and my thought is that it needs a pot that isn't smooth and symmetrical, with clean lines and angles. I have a craggy/fissured looking Ching Wen pot I was planning on using for this tree but I believe it's too small for the tree and the pot color is too similar to the bark color; I feel like the whole composition would be lost.

I think your #3 pot would be perfect, the colors and textures should go well together!
Whatever you do, when you are comfortable with it please send a picture.
 

cbroad

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@penumbra
Received this pot today and just wow!!! What a GORGEOUS creation!

You can see good detail in the pictures but it's nothing compared to holding it your hands! The darker stain in the low spots gives good depth and really brings out the textures. This definitely looks like an actual carved stone!

It's hard to tell from the pictures, but the asymmetrical sides are wonderful! The lower sides give a good view into the pot and the highest side gives almost a scoop pot feel to it (if that makes any sense).

I absolutely love it!!!

Nice and hefty, solidly built!

I'm thinking a wild and chunky ficus would look awesome in this pot! The dark green leaves would contrast well with it in my opinion. Can't wait to pot this up!

Thank you my friend!
 

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