Persimmon

just.wing.it

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JudyB

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Cute. Is this different than Princess persimmon? Those are very pretty with fruit.
 

GrimLore

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Where did you get a Date Plum:confused:? Never seen in these parts and rarely on the net except seed - nice one!

Grimmy
 

thumblessprimate1

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@JudyB I have not seen a Princess persimmon in person, so I can't say. I've seen fruit from these in person, and they are cute and pretty. About an inch long.

@GrimLore this is from a rootstock for Japanese persimmons. I'm going to get another one started in training.

I collected some fruit from a tree in the landscape last week, and may grow a batch next year.
 

thumblessprimate1

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@JudyB well, thinking back of my time at Mr. Kobayashi's place, maybe I did see some princess persimmon. They look similar to me, but to someone more experienced they may be very different.
 

GrimLore

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Leo in N E Illinois

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I've seen lists where for specific cultivars they recommend D kaki understock, or D lotus understock, Some of the D kaki cultivars grow faster than typical D kaki and the graft union becomes unstable because the scion is much larger in diameter than the understock. (looks really strange in photos) D lotus grows faster than normal wild form of D kaki, and is good understock for the rapid growing cultivars of D kaki. Also read some work is being done using D virginiana in more northern climates for understock of D. kaki, in an effort to extend hardiness. Have not read any reviews about the success of this technique over the long term, but it is quite likely that any Diospyros species can be grafted to another, with relative grow rates being the key to whether or not it will be long term stable.

Scion wood should have the same or just slightly slower growth rate than the understock, this will give a good match. Too rapid, or too slow will result in eventual instability or possible failure.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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There are over 200 species of Diospyros, most, but not all, have edible fruit, about 10% will produce true ebony heartwood, usually visible only in trees over 50 years of age. The rule of thumb, one inch of ebony for every 50 years. Ebony is not a rapidly renewable resource. Most species of Diospyros are tropical, many species in Africa, South America, Central & North America, South east Asia, Australia, Indonesia & Borneo & Philippines. Only a handful are winter hardy.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Persimmon is very much on my bucket list. A very large, old craggy-barked American variety.
 

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