Pest identification?

Yugen

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Does anyone recognize these worms? When I water my hemlock several of these small white worms wither out. The trees previous owner had some sort of root eating grubs and he applied nematodes. Are these beneficial nematodes?
 

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Clicio

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I am very curious about this technique of applying nematodes to the soil to finish off the grubs.
Does it work ? What if the nematodes are the bad ones and the roots will end up with galls?
Some nematodes (Meloidogyne species or root-knot nematodes) cause galls on the roots of susceptible plants.
 

Firstflush

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Not likely, beneficial nematodes are microscopic. That is how they enter the orifices of grubs, bad nematodes and other larva to destroy them.

IMHO, they do work. The process is a little bit of a pain cause the soil must be kept moist for about two weeks.
2 years ago I applied to the veggie beds and have seen considerable less beetle larva when I pull plants that are done producing.
 

Firstflush

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I do not know if beneficial nematodes can be adapted to container culture.....maybe if you use a deeper container with a tropical that requires more than average irrigation.
 

penumbra

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Chances are they are harmless and just feeding on organic matter. Better question would be how is you hemlock doing?
 

Yugen

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I am very curious about this technique of applying nematodes to the soil to finish off the grubs.
Does it work ? What if the nematodes are the bad ones and the roots will end up with galls?
Some nematodes (Meloidogyne species or root-knot nematodes) cause galls on the roots of susceptible plants.
You buy buy beneficial nematodes so there is no adverse risk. They definitely killed all the grubs in the roots. You buy em fresh or freeze dried and mix with warm water and then dilute that in a water bucket and you're good to go
 

Yugen

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Chances are they are harmless and just feeding on organic matter. Better question would be how is you hemlock doing?
I did think the nematodes were supposed to be smaller than this..I really hope these guys are harmless. They are eating something and I really want to know what. My hemlock was just printed and styles for the first time. It turned out really well but there is some troubling needle discolouration going down. That's why I thought these little buggers could be the culprit. Maybe nematodes will kill these worms...
 

Forsoothe!

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Looks like a young earthworm. Nematodes are microscopic and can only be viewed by the naked eye if you cut up a clean plant part, submerse it in clear water and look for them swimming. They are just barely visible because they are basically transparent. They will not be cost-effective unless you have many, many pots and big problems. Bayer 3-in-1 Rose will take care of most problems, and grubs are easy to see when you repot. If you have lots of money, Milky Spore is a forever treatment for turf lawns, but costs about $35/40 for a unit to treat a city lot lawn.
 

AJL

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Does anyone recognize these worms? When I water my hemlock several of these small white worms wither out. The trees previous owner had some sort of root eating grubs and he applied nematodes. Are these beneficial nematodes?
Baby earthworms so harmless!
 

DonovanC

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There are free-living nematodes, meaning they’re non-parasitic. But, as mentioned, they’re typically not easily seen with the naked eye.
I agree, it’s a baby earthworm or similar detritivore.
 

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